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March 11, 1981 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-03-11

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i

SPORTS

Page 8

Wednesday, March 11, 1981

The Michigan Daily

Op ortunity:
By MARTHA CRALL last year, I probably wouldn't be
My MAr . CA playing," he said. "It's nice to be part
'My future is this weekend. of the team."
All our futures are. This series "WE APPRECIATE him a great
is as far as we can look.' deal," said assistant coach Jeff
-Jeff Mars Jackson. "He's a likable kid and he's
At a time when senior athletes are very sincere as far as his team goes."
thinking about thr futures in the pro In his first three years Mars didn't
ranks, one, icer Jeff Mars, is thinking see regular playing time and he feels
only of the Michigan Wolverines and that his game wasn't given a chance to
their second-round Western Collegiate develop to its potential. Then John
Hockey Association playoff series Giordano came along and gave Mars a
against Michigan Tech in Houghton this lot of playing time.
weekend. "He had talent the whole time," said
Mars has the reputation of being an alternate captain John Blum. "He just
unselfish team player who is just happy had to get it through his own head. All
to be a cog in this season's hockey he needed was someone to have con-
machine. fidence in him, and the coach did, so
"If conditions were like they were now he'sigained it."
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'M' icer Mars takes

advantage
JACKSON AGREED, "The key has
been that he (Mars) has gained con-
fidence. He's progressed a great deal
this year because he was given a chan-
ce to prove himself."
Mars has responded with by far his
best season at Michigan. In his first
three seasons, the Duluth native scored
13 goals and added 17 assists for 30 poin-
ts in 87 games. This season he tied for
the team lead in goals scored with 22
and added 16 assists for 38 points in 36
games, good for sixth on the Wolverine
scoring list.
Like Blum said, the talent was there
all the time. Mars is considered the best
skater on the team and Jackson thinks
he is one of if not the best skater in the
league.
"Sometimes he's so wrapped up in
the offensive part of the game that he
forgets his defense," Jackson said.
"But he's very determined and right
now he's playing as well as he has all
season."
While Mars has been a force to be
reckoned with on the ice this season, he
is also active before and after ice-time
in the locker room, being the team's
leading practical joker.

of situation
"HE LIGHTENS things up even in
the most troubled times," siad Jackson.
"He has emerged as one of the leaders
of this team and all the guys really look
up to him."
One of his pranks included putting the
names of the Vince Lombardi-coached
Green Bay Packers of the mid-60s on
the backs of the players' practice jer-
seys, jokingly comparing the strict
regimentation Giordano employs to
that of the last mentor.
Mars put joking aside, though, when
he talked about Giordano and this
season.
"For a first year coach, he's done
amazingly well. Under all the circum-
stances this season, he's done a fan-
tastic job," said Mars.
HE RESPECTS Giordano's decisions
and feels the coach has as tough a job as
ahead as his team does. And the Tech
series is first and foremost on his mind.
"I can't think about anything past
this weekend. This is key. We've got to
get the kind of goaltending we did last
weekend and play our hardest," he ad-
ded. "Our future is this series."
No one ever accused Jeff Mars of
being selfish.

M

al

-Sports Information photo
MICHIGAN HOCKEY PLAYER Jeff Mars fires a pass to a Wolverine,
teammate.

TRACK COACHES DISAGREE:

Dispute over foreigners rages on

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By RON POLLACK
Along with an assortment of talented athletes, a
pervading air of controversy will be present when the
NCAA championships come to Detroit's Joe Louis
Arena this weekend.
In fact, the controversy is a direct result of many of
those same talented athletes. They are performers
from foreign countries, who are either the curse or
lifeblood of most track programs, and they have
caused quite a stir in track coaching circles.
Many argue that the presence of the foreign
athletes decreases the opportunities for American
athletes to win championships.
"Sometimes four of the eight people in the NCAA's
will be foreigners," said UCLA head coach Jim Bush.
"So these young Americans don't have a chance in
their own championships. Take cross country, for
example. They had to go the 50th man to get the 25th
All-American. That's just stupidity."
Another complaint that Bush makes against the use
of foreign athletes is that they are frequently much
older than their American counterparts.
"It just really gets to me to think there are these
overaged athletes against our young athletes," said
Bush. "There's no way an American can win in cer-
tain events against these overaged foreigners who
are world record holders. I think it's a shame that
some of these Americans will never have a chance at
their own collegiate records."
The NCAA has attempted to prevent overaged
athletes from competing by ruling that after an in-
dividual's 20th birthday and prior to his enrolling in

college, he will lose a year of athletic eligibility for
each 12-month period in which he participates in any
type of competition.
However, a loophole exists in this ruling. If the in-
dividual enters the armed services of his country,
and "most foreign athletes do," said Bush, then these
years are not counted.
Bush used to recruit foreign athletes who hQ insists
were 18 and 19-year-olds rather than overaged per-
formers, until the number of scholarships permitted
was limited to 14. "I didn't think it was right to
deprive an American of a scholarship in favor of a
ready-made athlete," said Bush.
"We could win the national title every year if we
brought these athletes in. We're either second or
third every year with Americans.
"The foreign countries would much rather see their
athletes come here for training and competition and
then go back and kick our tails," he said.
Taking an entirely different view than that of Bush
is University of Texas-El Paso head coach Ted
Banks.
"If they're a student at the University, then they
should be able to compete in any University ac-
tivitiy," said Banks.
Banks advocates that competition is an important
part of sports and thus believes that there is nothing
wrong with foreign athletes competing.
"The thing that people don't realize is that nothing
is equal," Banks said. "If we're going to excel but
can't get the top Americans, we have to go to other

places. If I can't get the best American, then I'm
going to get the best foreigners."
Banks also believes that it is advantageous to his
program to use foreignathletes, since the recruiting
wars for them are less fierce.
"I think it's easier to get top kids from foreign
countries than Americans, since not as many coaches
go after these foreigners. There isn't a coach from a
top track school who won't go after the top American.
But not all go after these foreigners," said Banks.
It is Bush's contention that further action should be
taken to limit the amount of competition by
foreigners.
"I would say the foreign athletes should be in every
meet except the nationals," he said. "Let's make it
an American meet. I don't think it's unconstitutional,
since they don't fall under our constitution."
Bush adds that such legislation is necessary
because "someplace we've lost the sight of our goal.'
Some coaches will do anything to win."
Banks says that he thinks this legislation would be
difficult to pass, although he does condede that
"there are.overaged foreigners, which is unfair."
Oregon head coach Bill Dellinger does not agree
with Bush's proposal that foreigners be banned from
the nationals, but he does have a proposal of his own.
"Too bad we can't have it where you can have the
same ratio of foreigners as the ratio of foreign
students."
Although Michigan is a predominantly non-foreign
team, they will send Andrew Bruce of Trinidad to the
NCAA championships.

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SPOR TS OF THE DAIL Y:

Tumblers score high to place 2nd

49

By BARB BARKER
The Michigan women's gymnastics
team, achieving their third highest
score of the season 136.8, took second
place in a tri-meet with Bowling Green
and Illinois State at Bowling Green last
weekend.
"All we really wanted was a high
score and that's what we got," said
Wolverine head coach Sheri Hyatt,
who, despite not taking first place, was
pleased with the meet's results. "It's
scores that count when you are shooting
for the nationals."
THE TUMBLERS were competing
one team member short due to a leg in-
jury suffered by freshman Maren Lin-
dstrom in practice last week, but ac-
cording to Hyatt, their performance
was not adversely affected. "The fact
that we only had five competitors in the

uneven bars did put a little extra
pressure on everyone to hit their
routines. But we usually perform our
best when the pressure is on."
Freshman Kathy Beckwith, the
meet's top all-arounder, achieved her
season's highest all-around score of
35.3, bringing her average to 35. points.
"With a 35 point average, Kathy should
be up there for the nationals," said
Hyatt.
Junior Teresa Bertoncin also had her
best meet of the year capturing third
place all-around position with a 33.65.
The tumblers' next meet will be
against Indiana State next Saturday at
Terre Haute, Ind.
Red Wings 4, Whalers 4
DETROIT (AP)-Dave Debol scored
three goals for the first time in his

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National Hockey League career as the
Hartford Whalers came from behind
twice last night to earn a 4-4 tie with the
Detroit Red Wings.
The deadlock was the fourth in a row
for the Red Wings and third straight in
four games against Hartford this
season.
WITH THE TIE, the Whalers, in 18th
place in the overall NHL standings,
remained one point ahead of 19th-place
Detroit, 53-52. The top 16 teams qualify
for the Stanley Cup'playoffs.
Both teams scored three goals in the
first period. After Debol opened the
scoring with a goal at 1:43, Mike
Foligno of Detroit tied it with a goal six'
seconds later. .
Brent Peterson and Dale McCourt
scored 67 seconds apart, at 4:35 and
5:42, respectively, to give Detroit a 3-1
lead. But Debol got one back for Har-
tford at 5:57 and Tom Rowe tied the
game with an unassisted goal at 11:31.

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