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March 08, 1981 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-03-08

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, March 8, 1981-Page 7

compiled by Maureen Fleming

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Protest angers gays
CAMBRIDGE, Mass.-,A fake anti-gay rally advocating
capital punishment for homosexuals, staged by a
Massachusetts Institute of Technology fraternity last week,
was met by angry cries from several gay student groups.
Following the rally; members of the Pi Lambda Phi frater-
nity delivered a letter of apology to the organization, Gays at
MIT, explaining the incident was only a prank.
Saying his group is not anti-homosexual, fraternity
president Jay Napoleon explained that the group stages a
fake rally every year-"taking a popular cause to a
ridiculous extent so it's obviously a farce."
Unamused J. French Wall, vice president of the Harvard-
Radcliffe Gay Students Association, said, "This has all the
effect of an assault and just can't be treated as a joke." He
added that he hopes MIT officials will take severe
disciplinary action against the fraternity.
Leaflets distributed during the rally contained quotes the
fraternity members made up, including one attributed to
Harvard President Derek Bok that said: "Homosexuals at
Harvard? No way, it's just not preppy."
MSU Title IX probe begins
EAST LANSING-Federal investigators began a probe
last week on possible instances of sex discrimination in
MSU's intercollegiate athletic program. This action stems
from a complaint filed in 1978 by an MSU woman.
The probe is one of more than eighty the Department of
Education will, eventually conduct. Investigators were on

Editor's note: "Other campuses" - corn
primarily from news items in college newspapers ar
the country - begins today as a regular Sunday fea
The University of Michigan campus last fall to conduct a'
similar probe but results from that review have not been
released yet.
Lou Anna Simon, MSU affirmative action officer, declined
to comment on the details of the complaint filed by the
student. And during the probe-which is expected to last
through Friday-neither MSU nor agency representatives
will comment on specific details of the review, although
procedures and regulations will be discussed.
The guidelines don't require sport-by-sport comparability
or equal-dollar expenditures in the men's and women's
programs, said Mary O'Shea, a spokeswoman for the
Chicago Regional Office for Civil Rights, a division of the
Department of Education. The investigation will take into
account nondiscriminatory factors that may justify differen-
ces in standards and benefits between the men's and
women's programs, she added..
The results of the investigation are expected to be released
around June 1;
Study links sex, dark
AUSTIN, Tex.-Studies released last week by three scien-
tists suggest a link between the onset of shorter days and in-
creased sexual activity, according to a University of Texas
Health Science Center physician who participated in
organizing the 1976 studies.
Prof. Michael Smolensky said the research indicates
human sexual activity increases during the late summer and
early fall months. The increase may be linkedl to the fact that
there are more hours of darkness during those months of the
year, he said.

Other findings were:
" The number of rapes reported in Houston, Paris, and
several other cities were found to have increased during the
late summer and early fall; and,
* The hormone testosterone, which is associated with male
sexual aggression and sexual activity, was produced in
heavier quantities during the autumn months.
Another study conducted by Smith found that sperm coun-
ts, which decrease as sexual activity increases, were 20 per-
cent lower in September than the yearly average.
Petition drive for
InPIRG funding begins
BLOOMINGTON, Ind.-The Indiana University Public In-
terest Research Group has begun a petition drive to remain
on the registration card fee check-off this fall.
According to IU rules, any student organization that ap-
pears on a registration card must receive contributions from
10 percent of the student body. If an organization doesn't
receive 10 percent, it must petition signatures from 25 per-
cent of the student body.
INPIRG Staff Director Dan Howell said he expects that
only 5 percent to 6 percent of those who registered checked
-off InPIRG on the card because of a usual drop in support
from fall to spring semester.
Last fall, the Public Interest Research Group in Michigan
was faced with a similar funding threat when the Regents
told PIRGIM if it did not get the necessary 25 percent student
support at CRISP, its contract with the University would be
allowed to terminate. PIRGIM Coordinator Rick Levick said
his group has managed to get the needed 25 percent, although
figures won't be official until later tuis term.

2 I"DAL T.EATRES
BARGAIN MATINEES
Wed. Sat. Sun. $2.00
.til 6:
Melvin,
(and Howard) (R)
DAILY-7:25 9.15
SAT 721:35
ACADEMY
NOMINATIONS
SISSY SPACEK (PG)

.

Report says extra
El Salvador aid could
trigger regional war

DAILY-7:10, 9:20
SAT: SUN.---2:20, 4:40, 7:10, 9:20

WASHINGTON (AP) - An increase
in military aid to El Salvador's gover-
nment could lead to a regional war that
ties down already-pressed U.S.
resources, thus achieving a "major
Soviet objective," according to a report
yesterday in Foreign Policy magazine.
The temptation to escalAte U.S. in-
volvement by providing weapons and
advisers to Central American rightists
should be weighed against a number of
considerations, writes author Robert
Leiken.
HE SAYS SUCH actions would:
" Strip the United States of credible
allies in the region by estranging
Mexico and crippling U.S. influence
with other significant countries such as
Venezuela, Panama, Costa Rica and
Ecuador.
" Trigger condemnation by many of
the United States' European allies, par-
ticularly thbs e with Social Democratic
governments.,
* Make the Salvadoran insurgents
dependent - as they now are not - on
aid from Cuba.
Leiken, who is with the Georgetown
University Center of Strategic and In-
ternational Studies, says increased out-
side intervention could ignite regional
war, pitting the governments of
Guatemala and perhaps Honduras
against Nicaragua and Cuba.
"A MAJOR SOVIET strategic objec-
tive would thus be achieved: the tying
down of U.S. resources already stret-
ched to the limit around the globe,"
Leiken says.

Leiken notes that while revolutions
provide openings for Soviet subversion
and penetration, they also reflect the
plight of the Latin American people.
"Revolutionary movements embody
popular aspirations for social justice,
independence and democracy," he
writes.
He warns that if the United States'
"interventionist tradition is revived ...
the Soviets will benefit."
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Laughing at death
Condemned killer Steven Judy said he is looking forward to tomorrow's
scheduled execution at Indiana State Prison. Judy chastised the American
Civil Liberties Union for trying to gain him a stay of execution against his
wishes. "I was given the death sentence," Judy said. "If that was the
'punishment handed out, I feel it should be carried out."

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