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March 05, 1981 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SPORTS

Page 8

Thursday, March 5, 1981

The Michigan Daily

- ------------

Gophers tough test

JOL IRMM.001

By JON MORELAND
Most Big Ten basketball fans
probably don't even remember the
game. Along with providing coach Bill
Frieder with his first Big Ten win, it
gave Michigan a split in the crucial con-
ference-opening road trip that began
with a loss at Purdue.
To refresh your memory, the game
MICHIGAN (16-9, 7-9)
40-Mike McGee, 6-5 Sr. (24.1) .... .
45-Thad Garner, 6-7 Jr. (9.7) ......
15-Paul Heuerman,6-8 Sr. (7.4) ...
34-John Johnson, 6-4 Sr. (14.8) .....
24-Marty Bodnar,,6-3 Sr. (7.2) .....

was on January 10, 1981, when the
Wolverines bounced the Minnesota
Golden Gophers in Minneapolis in
double-overtime, 68-67. That win
brought the Wolverines back to Ann
Arbor in excellent shape and saddled
Minnesota with a possibly disastrous
home-court loss.
BUT IN THE Big Ten, the situation
Corner

F
F
C
G
G

MINNESOTA (17-8, 9-7)
.... 33-Zebedee Howell, 6-7 So. (2.9)
..... 42-Gary Holmes, 6-10 Jr. (7.9)
.... 45-Randy Breuer, 7-3 So. (14.8)
..... 32-Trent Tucker, 6-5 Jr. (14.3)
.........24-Mark Hall, 6-2 Jr. (14.9)

can quickly change.
The Gophers visit Crisler Arena this
evening, and with just two games
remaining on the conference schedule,
they are the ones with the excellent shot
at an NCAA Tournament berth. Last
weekend's sweep of Illinois and
Michigan State left Minnesota with a 9-7
record and a fourth place tie in the con-
ference.
"We've been playing our best ball of
the season lately," said Minnesota
coach Jim Dutcher. "We'd like to keep
things going by winning two more this
week."
THE WOLVERINES, on the other
hand, are in the midst of a six-game
losing streak which has left them in a
tie for sixth in the conference at 7-9. In
the last three weeks, Michigan has
shown little of the spunk it displayed in
the double-overtime win in Min-
neapolis.
The recent streak poses some
problems for Frieder in his attempt to
avoid letting the skid become a seven-
game affair. "We have to get the kids
fired up," said the first-year head
coach. "We've got a lot of pride to prove
that what we've accomplished already
this season was no fluke."
But playing Minnesota at a time like
this doesn't make the prospects of tur-
ning things around much easier.
"THEY'LL BE juiced up because
they are on a win streak and in the hunt
for a NCAA berth," observed the coach.
And Michigan's problems don't just
hinge on the momentum factor either;

or 'M
Minnesota is a very talented basketball
team.
"It will be a very difficult game for us
because Minnesota has great size inside
and great shooters outside," continued
Frieder.
THE "GREAT SIZE" Frieder
referred to includes 7'2" center Randy
Breuer. The sophomore pivotman leads
the Gophers with a 16.4 scoring average
in Big Ten games and is the Gophers'
second leading rebounder.
At forward, Dutcher will employ 6-10
Gary Holmes and 6-7 Zebedee Howell.
The junior, Holmes, is averaging 7,9
points a game and leads his team in
rebounds.
THE BACKCOURT duo of Mark Hall
and Trent Tucker are currently playing
as well as any pair in the league. Hall is.'
averaging 14.9 points per game while
Tucker is scoring at a 14.3 p.p.g. clip.
This list of Gopher starters is
noticeably absent of one
ingredient-seniors. Minnesota has ac-
complished everything this season
without a senior on the squad.
The Wolverines, on the other hand,
start four seniors and a junior, and they
will no doubt need to call upon every
minute of Big Ten experience if they
hope to end their losing streak.
One advantage the Wolverines will
enjoy is the fact that the Golden
Gophers haven't won a game in Ann
Arbor since 1963. But then again, Nor-
thwestern was winless in Crisler Arena
since 1967 until two weeks ago.

PLAYER
McGee ................................
Johnson ......................t........
Garner ................................
Heuerman .............................
Bodnar. Mt ............... ..........
McCormick ...........................
Bodnar, Mk.. ....................
Burton ................................
Jam es ................................
Hopson ................................
Person .. ... .........................
Pelekoudas ...............
Antonides..........................
Brown....... .................
Team Rebounds ..........
Totals...........................
Opponents .............................
SCORING
G FG/A Pct FT
Vincent, MSU ..... 16 165/334 .494 59/
McGEE, MICH .... 16 157/315 .49866/
Gregory, WIS ...16 112/247 .453 94/1
Kellogg, OSU ...... 16 120/238 .504 57/
Roberson, NU ..... 16 108/247 .437 77/
REBOUNDING
No. Avl
Kellogg, OSU.............188 11.:
GregoryWIS .............145 9.
Johnson,Ill................ 143 8.
Vincent, MSU ............. 136 8.
Williams, OSU.............127 7.

FG-A Pct FT-A Pct Reb PF-D A Pts Avg
252484 .521 99-147 .674 99 74-5 30 603 24.1
164-294 .558 41-50 .820 91 38-0 92 369 14.8
95-190 .506 53-73 .726 139 69-2 66 243 9.7
58-125 .464 68-84 .810 131 84-6 49 184 7.4
77-133 .579 26-33 .788 58 54-0 75 180 7.2
47-95 .495 42-54 .777 72 72-2 11 136 5.4
24-50 .480 15-19 .790 17 21-0 46 63 2.9
13-29 .448 4.10 .400 20 15-0 2 30 2.0
15-36 .417 3-5 .600 20 13-0 8 33 1.
4-19 .211 7-11 .636 9 8-0 2 15 1.4
12-28 .429 8-11 .727 31 16-0 8 32 1.4
4-8 .500 4-9 .444 3 17-0 5 12 0.8
2-3 .667 2-6 .333 6 8-0 0 6 0.7
2-7 .286 0-1 .000 9 6-0 0 4 0.4

769-1501 .512
720-1444 .499

57
372-513 .725 819
328477 .688 818

497-15 394
473-12 331

1910 76.4
1768 70.7

S

Michigan 25-game statistics

GAME TIME: 8:05 p.m.,.Crisler Arena
TV/RADIO: WKBD (Channel 50); WWJ-950; WAAM-1600; WPAG-1050; WJJX-
650; WUOM-91.7 (FM)
EXPECTED CROWD: 12,000
TICKET AVAILABILITY: As of noon yesterday, some 2000 tickets were still
available. They will be on sale at the Athletic Department from 8
a.m. to 5 p.m., and at Crisler Arena one hour before game time.
-y ~

/A
89
!99
118
71
91
V9.
.8
1
.9
.5
.9

Pct
.652
.667
.797
.803
.846

Avg
24.3
23.8
19.9
18.5
18.3

...... ., ....ASSISTS
Walker, PUR.............
Harper, ILL ............ I
Smith, MSU............. !
I. Thomas, IND.........
Arnold, IOWA .............

Hi
19
17
13
16
11
Hi
12
12
11
9
11

Iowa.............
Indiana..........
Illinois...........
Minnesota ..........
Purdue...........
MICHIGAN ........
Ohio State.........
Michigan State.
Wisconsin .... ......
Northwestern ......

Big Ten Standings

Conf.
W L
13 3
12 4
11 5
9 7
9 7
7 9
7 9
6 10
3 13
3 13

Overall
W L
21 4
19 9
19 6
17 8
16 9
16 9
12 13
12 13
9 15
9 16

0

No. 'Avg.
105 6.6-
88 5.5
84 5.3
78 4.9
69 4.3

T nIdh c(2Y~£

S

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE -n-- a -i-
FG A Pct. Minnesota at MICHIGAN
Tolbert, IND .............. 97 154 .630 Indiana at Illinois
Hall, MINN ................ 96 158 .608 Iowa at Michigan State
Breuer, MINN ............. 98 170 .576 Purdue at Ohio State
Smith, MSU............... 105 187 .561 Northwestern at Wisconsin
Edmonson, PUR....... ...'110 197 .558

Ex-M' grappler to be head coach

/

By RON POLLACK
When Mark Churella graduated
from Michigan he was obviously unac-
customed to setbacks, as his three con-
secutive NCAA wrestling champion-
ships (twice at 150 pounds and once at
167 pounds) will attest.
After ° graduation, Churella still did
not have to overcome any obstacles
as he was offered the job of assistant
wrestling coach at Michigan, Nevada-
Las Vegas (UNLV),'Arizona State and
Oklahoma State. He chose Nevada-Las
Vegas and began training for the 1980
Olympics.
WITH THE U.S. boycott of the Olym-
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pics, Churella finally tasted obvious
disappointment. This setback was
compounded by the fact that he had
narrowly missed qualifying for the 1976
Olympics (he finished fourth in
freestyle competitin at his weight. The
top three went to Montreal).
But now, Churella's life is headed in a
more positive direction, because, after
two years as an assistant at UNLV, he

will become the team's head coach next
season. Churella will replace Dennis
Finfrock, who is currently the head
coach and assistant athletic director.
Finfrock will now spend all his time on
the assistant athletic director post.
Churella originally intended to coach
at Michigan, but before making his
decision he visited UNLV one more
time, and chose to go west.
"I JUST DECIDED that I'd try
something different, and Las Vegas
was different," said Churella. "At that
time I was looking for a situation where
I could train for the '80 Olympics and
here, unlike Michigan, we don't have
any professional sports. Amateur spor-
ts is all they have in Nevada. This is a
place I thought would be good to build a
program."
Churella does not forsee any
problems once he becomes the head

coach, because Finfrock has been
easing him into the position, giving him
added responsibilities this year so that
the transition will be easier.
With-two years of coaching under his
belt, Churella has found that certain
parallels can be drawn between com-
peting and coaching.
"I PUT A LOT of time into training as
a wrestler, and now I spend a lot of time
coaching," said Churella. "I think
there's a trade-off between the time you
spend as a wrestler and the time you
spend as a coach. It really evens out."
Nonetheless, the life of Churella the
wrestler isrnot a carbon copy of
Churella the coach.
"As a coach there's a frustration that
you don't have as a wrestler," said
Churella. "When you're a wrestler, if
you make a mistake you can correct it.
As a coach you have ten starting
wrestlers who all might be making dif-
ferent mistakes. It's not always
possible to correct everybody's
mistakes, although you try to."
THIS SEASON HAS been a down year
for a Nevada-Las Vegas squad that has
a dual meet record of 4-6. During the
season, UNLV has had to overcome
more than opposing teams. "This
season was a big setback since our
athletic department had a big budget
deficit which we no longer have. As a
matter of fact, now we're in the black,"
said Churella. "We had scholarship
cutbacks and a budgetary cutback of
our expenses. Last year we just
recruited out West, but this year I'll
also recruit out East.

Now that these barriers have been
overcome, Churella is optimistically
looking to the future. To say that he has
set lofty goals for the team is quite an
understatement.
"Realistically, this year, we'll be
taking three boys to the nationals and
I'd like one All-American," said
ChurellA. "e if we have the

0

- , .> .;

r

Churella
... UNLV coach
recruiting year I'm hoping for, I'd like
a national champion. Beyond that, I'm
hoping for a national champion team,
but that's in the future."
"Like any coach, I don't like to lose-
not as a competitior and not as a coach.
To win a national championship would
be to obtain the ultimate goal as' a
coach."

6

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- 8

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this summer
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museums, athletic facilities and calendar of
cultural activities, and may live in Harvard's
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Liberal Arts and Education
Undergraduate and graduate courses in more
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Pre- Professional Offerings.
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Special Programs
Six-week Dance Center and Career Strat-

On - Campus
Interviews

Academic Calendar
June 22-August 14, 1981
For further information
Return the coupon below or contact
Harvard Summer School, Department 34
20 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138.
Telephone: (617) 495-2921
--- ----- -l.
Please send Harvard Summer School
catalogue and application for:
- Q Arts & Sciences and Education 3
Q English as a Foreign Language
1 Q] Secondary School Student Program
Q- nDance Center

0.

Wednesday, March 11

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