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March 04, 1981 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-03-04

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Ninety-One Years
E *of
Editorial Freedom

cfitctigau

11I ai1u

BACK TO
THE GRIND
Light snow today becoming
mixed with and possibly
changing to rain. High 40°.
Low around 20*

Vol. XCI, No 123

Copyright 1981, The Michigan Daily

Ann Arbor, Michigan-Wednesday, March 4, 1981

Ten Cents

Ten Pages

1w.

I U

MUCN S BT WE
CALL IT HOME.$
$50 A.4 1oNT'4.
a
udnts offer
beer, nirvana
to sub tenants

Reagan says El

Salvador

not a repeat of Vietnam

WASHINGTON (UPI) - President
Reagan, in a White House interview
with CBS News Correspondent Walter
Cronkite, denied last night a parellel
between El Salvador and Vietnam.
Reagan said he sees no likelihood the
United States will send American com-
bat forces to the strife-torn Central
American country.
Earlier yesterday wary members of
Congress supported Reagan's $50
million program of U.S. military and
economic aid for El Salvador.
SECRETARY OF STATE Alexander
Haig told Congress yesterday that the
program will help El Salvador defeat a
Soviet and Cuban-backed challenge in
the Western Hemisphere.
Reagan told Cronkite last night, "I
certainly don't see any likelihood of us
going in with fighting forces."
But, many congressmen were con-
cerned that the United States may be
slowly slipping into another Vietnam
situation of financing, and possibly
sending troops into, an essentially civil
war or native insurgency.
IN A TRANSCRIPT of a portion of the
interview with Cronkite, Reagan
discounted talk that his administration
is in danger of involving the United
States in another Vietnam-style conflict
with ever-increasing American force
commitments.
"I do see our continued work in the
field of diplomacy with neighboring
countries that are interested in Central
America, South America, to bring this
violence to a halt," the president said,

"and to make sure that we do not just
sit passively by and let this hemisphere
be invaded by outside forces."
The president said he hopes the
United States has learned from its ex-
perience in Vietnam "that never again
do we send an active fighting force to a
country to fight unless it is for a cause
that we intend to win."
HE SAID THERE are a number of
actions short of military force open to
the United States as it seeks to stop the
flow of weapons into Central America.
He cited diplomacy and trade san-
ctions.
Reagan said he sees no parallel bet-
ween Vietnam and El Salvador,
although "I know that parallel is being
drawn by many people.
"But the difference is so profound.
What we are actually doing is at the
request of the government, in one of our
neighboring countries, helping, offering
some help against the import or the ex-
port into the Western hemisphere or
terrorism, or disruption - and it isn't
just El Salvador.
"That happens to be the target at the
moment," Reagan said.
Stopping the arms shipments at their
source, as Haig has said, means "inter-
cepting and stopping the supplies
coming into these countries - the ex-
port from Cuba of those arms, the
training of the guerillas as they have
done there," Reagan said.
"I don't think that in any way he was
suggesting an assault on Cuba,"
Reagan said of Haig.

By PAMELA KRAMER
Judging by signs posted on kiosks
and bulletin boards all over campus,
a fair number of students would
readily sell their souls to sublet their
apartments this summer.
The ads offer everything from
beer to nirvana for summer sub-
tenants. Huge lettering screams
everything from "Hey, you!" to
"Multiple Orgasms!" in an effort to
attract attention.
AND, TRUE TO ANN Arbor
subletting tradition, plusses like air-
conditioning, good location, and a
private room are the main selling
points.
Most area leases run for 12 mon-
ths, either from May to May or from
September to September. But most
students are in town for only eight
months.
In an effort to salvage as much
summer rent money as they can,
most tenants are forced to sublet
their apartments or rooms, usually
for less money than they are paying
the landlords.
Tenants here compete fiercely in
the struggle to find subtenants, ac-
cording to Jo Williams, University
director of off-campus housing.

"They (the subtenants) know that,
come summer, it's their market,"
she said.
THE MOST POPULAR units are
efficiencies and one-bedroom apar-
tments, according to Williams.
Students subletting these units
should "see if they can't hold out for
pretty much the full price, maybe 80
to 90 percent," Williams said.
Tenants of apartments with two or
more bedrooms will probably only
be able to get from 20 percent to 50
percent, she added.
The most common type of sublet
involves formal agreement between
the tenant, landlord, and subtenant.
The tenant continues to be respon-
sible for the entire rent, and the sub-
tenant must pay the tenant his/her
share.
"I ALWAYS TELL students that
they should collect a security deposit
from their subtenants," said an em-
ployee of Campus Management, an
area rental company. "We provide a
checklist for the subtenants to fill
out in case of damages, so the
original tenants are not billed for
damage they aren't responsible
for."
See STUDENTS, Page 5

AP Photo
WALTER CRONKITE meets with President Reagan in Washington for a
farewell interview before Cronkite retires from his position as CBS anchor-
man later this week. Reagan embellished his critism of the Soviet Union in
the interview. Before a superpower summit could take place, Reagan said,
the Soviet Union would have to reveal its willingness to moderate its "im-
perialism."

Woman found in Huron River near Arb

.. .w,..By DAVID SPAK
The body of an unidentified woman was found in the
Huron River near Nichols Arboretum yesterday, ac-
cording to Ann Arbor Police Sgt. William Canada.
The cause of her death has not yet been deter-
mined, but police said there was no evidence of foul
play.
The woman, apparently in her late 20s, was in the
river for about 30 minutes before officials from the
Ann Arbor Fire Department, Ann Arbor Police
Department, Washtenaw County Sheriff's Depar-
tment and the Fontana-Taylor Ambulance Service
were able t6 remove her body from the river, accor-
ding to Nancy Fontana part-owner of the ambulance
service.

FONTANA SAID the woman's heart was not
beating when she was pulled from the river, and ef-
forts to revive her on the scene and at University
Hospital were unsuccessful.
Witnesses at the scene said it took emergency per-
sonnel at least 15 minutes to retrieve the woman's
body from the river.
One witness, Ann Arbor resident Bruce Stafford,
said police officials at the Arboretum were not
prepared to go in the water after the body.
"WE JUST WATCHED the body float under the
bridge and they (emergency personnel) didn't do
anything," Stafford said. "They didn't even have a
wet suit or raft-nothing to go into the water with."
Stafford also said when he first saw the woman it
was difficult for him to distinguish that the object in

the river was a body.
He:said police were finally able to get the body out
of the river when one official waded in with a rope
around his waist held by several people on the shore.
POLICE ARE NOT sure if the woman fell or jum-
ped into the river, but apparently a man who saw her
enter the river called the police emergency phone
number.
Washtenaw County Sheriff's Department called the
ambulance to the scene at 2:48 p.m. yesterday and
Fontana said she didn't leave with the body for the
hospital until 3:11p.m.
Stafford said the body was fully clothed and police
said there were no overt marks of foul play.
An autopsy will probably be conducted today,
Canada said. Police have not ruled out suicide.

x' n
Visiingscholars discuss role___
9 pip.- ,77-

of morals in tec

By JANET RAE
Morally, most people would agree
that it is impossible to put a price tag on
a human life. New medical technology
is lauded as an admirable improvement
in the human existence. But, at some
point, there is an end to financial
feasibility-but where does that point
lie?
Martin Green and Arthur Caplan
were featured guests in a symposium
entitled "The Quantification Of Values
In A Technological Age." The two
*cholars spoke yesterday about roral
obligations in an advanced scientific
era.
"The quantification of values is both
a fact which I cannot deny, and a threat
which I have to fight," said Green, a
professor of English at Tufts Univer-

sity. "Humanists, including myself,
feel themselves threatened by science
and technology."
GREEN DESCRIBED the attempt to
quant iv values as being a narrow ap-
proaci3 o technological dilemmas-like
trying to view the situation with a single
narrow beam of light.
"We need a different vision to see to
the sides and behind us to see what we
have missed," he said.
According to Caplan, an associate for
Social Medicine at Columbia Univer-
sity, this dilemma of how best to look at
the quantifying effort is also of major
concern in allocating new technologies
in the field of medicine.
"QUESTIONS regarding the
allocation, development, and accep-

inologic
table cost of treatments for kidney
disease are illustrative of the kinds of
moral issues confronting physicians,
scientists, and public policymakers in
all areas of medical technology," said
Caplan.
The problem that medical resear-
chers are facing, explained Caplan, is
the question of "Who's to say, 'that
costs too much'?"
According to Caplan, value decisions
in the field of medical technology are
based on two different deter-
minations-the "computational" and
the "moral."
"UNFORTUNATELY," said Caplan,
"it's more likely to be the values of the
calculator than the values of anyone
else."
Making reference to the "fearful

al age
predicament" the world now faces in
the form of nuclear war, Green ex-
pressed concern about limiting the ap-
plication of values to scientific advan-
ces.
Green cited the writings of one scien-
tist, Freeman Dyson, who confronts the
ethical choices that must be made when
scientific research contributes to ad-
vances in sophisticated weaponry.
"Technology," explained Green, "has
made evil anonymous."
In attempting to describe the dilem-
ma of the scientist trying to face the
realities of the "practical" applications
to which his work is contributing, Green
described the mental battle as
"retreating from one moral position to
another until (the scientist) has no
moral position at all."

Daily Photo by DEBORAH LEWIS
TUFTS UNIVERSITY English Prof. Martin Green speaks at a symposium
sponsored by the Department of Humanities of the College of Engineering.
The conference, which continues today, is on the quantification of values.
...............................................................................................................

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TODAY
Taxing job
MOST PEOPLE DREAD filling out federal tax
forms, but not Mike Burlent. "It's nice to get
away from homework for a while," says the
LSA junior of his volunteer work for the Volun-
teer Income Tax Assistance program. The program, a part
of the University's Project Community, is a free service
designed to help students and local residents cope with their
federal income tax forms. Accnrding tn Rurlent nearlv RA

Olney, England, was the two-time winner of her town's
traditional Shrove Tuesday pancake race yesterday. At a
similar competition in Liberal, Kansas a few hours later,
Gillian Brewer was the winner, but her time was 65 secon-
ds, three seconds above Ludgate's winning time. The Olney
competition began on Shrove Tuesday in 1445. Since that
time, runners attired in a dress, apron, and scarf, race
along a 415-yard, S-shaped course with skillet in hand, flip-
ping a pancake twice as they race. Despite Olney's win,
Liberal still leads the series, which began in 1950, by an 18-
13 margin. Last year's race was termed a draw after a
.. .....t.. At - - -... .. ..,-.. . . . , .

believed the wedding would take place in Westminster Ab-
bey, the historic site of royal ceremonies. But, alas, the
puny Abbey holds only 1,700 people, and the popular
couple's guest list is going to be closer to 3,000. Micheal
Shea, the queen's press secretary, said yesterday, "There
is no requirement for the Prince of Wales or indeed
anybody else to marry in Westminster Abbey. It is a matter
of his personal choice and that of Lady Diana Spencer."
And that was that. Yesterday Buckingham Palace announ-
ced Lady Diana's official titles once she marries the heir to
the British throne. If you happen to bump into her on the
a. ..-+ 1 ma A-ne hnr .-n, x.,by nllin ,ar Vn,..

said Paxton, 23, walked into the East Los Angeles branch of
Community Bank, pointed a .25-caliber pistol at a teller,
and ordered her to hand over the money. The teller gave
Paxton $1,710 and the gunman ran to his car, deputies said.
When he realized his keys were locked inside, he ran down
an alley and into a nearby house, where he held a gun to the
head of Ezequiel Casto, 21, and allegedly threatened to
shoot the man's wife and 3-year-old son. Several minutes
later, Paxton agreed to surrender peacefully to deputies
surrounding the home.
I tku-. *L. is WJAr

i

II

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