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March 03, 1981 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-03-03

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Page 6-Tuesday, March 3, 1981-The Michigan Daily

MYTH,
MAGIC
f AND
jLE-uGEN
International loan
of 85 17th century
Dutch masterworks.
Epic canvases by
Rembrandt,
Vermeer and
others reveal the
heroic, savage and
lustful themes of
legend and classics.
Incredible paintings
from royalty,
Holland's historic
town halls and
world museums.

Students find variety in housing choices

(Continued from PageU
month per unit for next year are: Ef-
ficiency, $265; one-bedroom, $300; two-
bedroom, $450; and three-bedroom,
$600.
Those estimates are for furnished
apartments within walking distance of
central campus that have 12-month
leases, and don't include utilities. The
estimates are very rough, and students
may end up paying more, according to
Jo Williams, director of Off-Campus
Housing.
A SAMPLE of houses available next
year shows average rents of: three-
bedroom, $675; four-bedroom, $775;
and five-bedroom, $995.
Other expenses involved in living in
an apartment or house add up. Accor-
ding to Off-Campus Housing estimates,
average monthly electric bills range
from $20 to $25 per month for a three or
four person apartment. Heating bills
can run from $50 to $100 per month
during winter months (oil and electric
heat are much more expensive than

gas). Telephone installment rates
range from $20 to $41.
Some roommates buy all of their food
together, labelling favorite items that
are off-limits to others. But most
students say it's easier either to buy
everything separately, or somehow
combine the two methods.
"WE FEND FOR ourselves for
breakfast and lunch, but we're like the
Waltons for dinner," Davey said.
The Office of Off-Campus Housing
estimates that students should expect
to spend about $100 per month for food
next year.
"We based this on fairly careful
shopping," Williams said. "It's easy to
just stop at one of the convenient cam-
pus area stores for food, but it's really
worth it to go out to Kroger's once a
week, even after you figure time and
gas."
"THERE'S MORE responsibility, but
as long as you know a lot of people, an
apartment is definitely worth the
hassle," said Robbie Stahler, a transfer
junior in Business who lives in an apar-

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tment near campus. "And it didn't take
me long to get used to cooking."
Bill Richardson, an Inteflex III
student who lives alone in an apartment
close to campus, said he thinks the
trade-off of higher rent for the privacy
of living alone is worth it.
"You have to be more self-contained,
but I really enjoy my own company ...
very rarely I can't entertain myself
anymore. It's really bad if you don't
have any money," he said. "But there's
always the telephone."
STUDENTS LIVING in houses and
apartments also say they enjoy the
close-knit atmosphere that isn't present
in a dorm.
"I appreciate the opportunity to get
up in the middle of the night to urinate
without having to worry that
Ieverything in my room will be gone
when I get back," said Darrell Davey,
who lived in Bursley last year.
"But we have to clean our own toilets
now," he said. "And in the dorm you
can break a lot of stuff and say the guy
down the hall did it. . . we go through a
lot of windows here, and at Bursley that
would have been no problem."
Fraternities and sororities
Some students leaving dorm life
choose the Greek life, which many say
offers the benefits of a dorm, and more.
"It's a comfortable living situation,"
said LSA junior Lisa Springer, who has
lived at Alpha Chi Omega for two years.
"It's nicla not having to go shopping. It
can be a little noisier here than at some
dorms at times, and you're not as prone
to meet a lot of new people as in a dorm
. . . but I decided the advantages of
living in a sorority outweighed the ad-
vantages of living in an apartment."
A SORORITY IS like a home at
school, according to LSA junior Mary
Rife, president of Kappa Kappa Gam-
ma. Although there is lack of privacy in
some instances, she said, "There's
room for diversity, for personal growth.
And I like the ritual formality," she ad-
ded.
A fraternity gives the opportunity for
creativity, accordingto Engineering
junior Marc Zupmore, who lives at Zeta
Beta Tau. "For instance, we wanted to
have a beach party, so we brought a
truckload of sand into the basement,"
he said.
Read and Use

"Steve Klamerus, an Inteflex III
student who has lived at Alpha Delta
Phi for two years, said fraternities are
a great alternative living arrangement.
"EVERYBODY knows each other,
and the activities of the Greek system
are great, too," Klamerus said, adding
that there are also impositions at times.
"Pledging is often an extreme
bother," he said. "But you have to
realize, you don't just live here. You
have to give some time. That's part of
what a fraternity is about."
There are 17 sororities and 42 frater-
nities in Ann Arbor. They offer a
variety of living arrangements,
ranging from single rooms to annexed
apartments to suites to dorms.
IN MOST CASES, members con-
tribute to an activities fund, to cover
social functions, and "it's important to
choose the right one (fraternity or
sorority) to get the social atmosphere
you're looking for," Zupmore said.
The charge for room and board does
not vary with room type. The Off-
Campus Housing Office estimates that
room and board will average $250 per
month in fraternities next year, and
about $265 per month in sororities.
Co-operatives
Students may also choose to live in
co-operative housing, either on or off-
campus.
"In this economic slump, co-ops are a
real godsend for many people," said
Luther Buchele, executive secretary of
Ann Arbor's Inter-Cooperative Council.
CO-OPS ARE cheaper than any other
type of housing, and they have a
healthy living environment, according
to David Marker, a graduate student
who lives in Osterweil, near central
campus.
Students in ICC co-ops are their own
landlords; they determine how much
room and board charges will be (these
include utilities, telephone service
charges, laundry costs, newspaper and
magazine subscriptions, and snacks).
If there is a surplus at the end of the
semester, residents receive a rebate.
"The whole idea is, you share rights

and responsibilities," Marker said.
"The only negative aspect I can
possibly think of is that you don't have
quite as much privacy as in an apa
tment."
CHARGES IN ICC co-ops do not vary
for students living in singles, doubles,
or triples, and Buchele said the
estimated rate for room and board nett
year is $220 per month.
University Oxford co-ops, located on
the perifery of Central Campus, are
also "nontraditional," according
Mike Segle, a second-year graduat
student and Resident Director of Ox-
ford's Goddard.
Because the Oxford co-ops, co-ed 1ty
floor, are subject to University
placement, there is a fairly high tur-
nover of residents, he said.
THE OXFORD co-ops offer a quiet,
residential atmosphere, close to the
Arb. "They draw a lot of upper-
classmen and graduate students,"
Segle said. "There are French, Gerg
man, and Russian Houses, and we try tow
draw students speaking those
languages, but the University has a
nasty habit of placing students in
whatever spaces are open, and that
doesn't always work."
Like the ICC co-ops, Oxford co-ops
assign jobs with respect to students'
class and work schedules.
Unlike the ICC co-ops, rates vary ac-
cording to room types. The Housing (Jf
fice estimates that a double will cost
$220 per month, and a quad will cost
$163 per month next year.
Family Housing
Compared to most Ann Arbor housing
rates, family housing is inexpensive.
Average rates for next year are: One-
bedroom, $212; two-bedroom, $261; arid
three-bedroom, $320.
The reason the University can affor*
to rent so cheaply, according toi Ed
Salowitz, is that it does not have to pay
property taxes that other landlords
have to pay. Family housing units are
assigned on the basis of need.
Of the 1,675 apartments available,
most are for students, while some may
be rented by faculty members.

Dutch Painting in the
Age of Rembrandt
NOW THROUGH
EASTER
T HE DETROIT
INSTITUTE OF ARTS
Hours: Tues.-Sun.,
9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Adm.: Gen. $2.50.
Students/Seniors $1.50.
Children under 12 with
adults, Free.

The '-!\M ProfessionalI Theatre Program ichigan Lnsemble ITheat re

Ann Arbor's Own
Resident Professional Theatre

Company

1)EBUTI P~ROD1C '(' ON
Ilenrik Ibsen's
A DollHaiise

Join The
Daily

March 25-29, 8 pm

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

Sunday at 2pm and 8pm

Tickets at PTP

Call 764-0450

1 5

A SALE OF CLASSIC PROPORTIONS!
Ever
RCA Red Seal
Classical
Recording
In Stock Is
Now O n Sale,

Four MSU colleges
may be phased out

Daily
Classifieds

!

(Continued from Page 1
income families, abused wives and
children, and those living in remote
areas will suffer, said a spokesperson
for the state Department of Public
Health.
MSU STUDENTS and faculty are
contacting alumni and nursing
associations across the state in an ef-
fort to organize protest movements to
persuade the Trustees' to keep the
college.
However, Given said the elimination
of the College of Nursing "is pretty
likely."{
Nursing student Sue Havalind said
that sexism and faulty stereotypes con-
cerning the nursing school may have
played a part in the administration's
decision.
"They think that all nurses do is take
temperatures," Havalind said. "They
don't think we need bachelor or
masters degrees to do the work."
James Madison College, which is a
social science, pre-law oriented school,
and Lyman Briggs, which specializes in
science and math, have a combined
enrollment of more than 860 students.
Although some of those students
might not graduate before a possible
elimination date, an MSU ad-
ministrator who preferred to remain

anonymous, said "the students will be
taken care of some way.
In the fact of a possible $29.2 million
deficit for the 1981-82 academic year,
the MSU trustees declared a state o
financial crisis last month.
Many students and faculty objected
to the Trustees' decision, fearing that
the resolution was a prelude to the
firing of tenured faculty members.'
Geography-
hearin gsz
to be held
Students and faculty are invited to
comment this week on possible
discontinuance of the Geography
Department. Public hearings will be
held from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. on Thursday
and from noon-4 p.m. on Fridayil.
Room 2553 LSA. Persons interested
in addressing the Geography
Review Committee should contact
Prof. Harvey Brazer, chairman of
the committee, at least 48 hours
before the meeting. Brazer can be
reached at 763-0027.

VVALOURMONSI
RAMtSSOL09M

JAMES GALWAY
Plays
STAMITZ
Two Concertos
C. P. E. Bach: Unaccompanied Sonata
New Irish Chamber Music
Andre Prieur, Conductor

JAMES GALWAY
French Flute Concertos
Ibert - Poulenc * Chaminade - Faur6
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Charles Dutoit, conductor
RCA RED SEAL
JAMES GALWAY
SONG
OF
THE SEASHORE
OtherMelodies of Jqw

SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 1 PM
MICHIGAN THEATRE
$8.50 RESERVED
Tickets at Herb David's Guitar
Studios, Schoolkids' Records
and the Ark. No checks

,.

RED SEALT

1c1

JAMES GALWAY
Plays
BACH
Two Flute Concertos " Suite in B Minor
I SOLISTI 01 ZAGREB

RIDR

4 Days to the Event
'8Saturday March 7,
8 pm in the Unionfl
Carnival Games o Casino o Prizes

SEAL

01

CLEO JAMES
LAINE & GALWAY

JAMES GALWAY
Annie's Song
and
Other Gal ay Favoritas
inch ding
Bachianas Bras!tewas No. S/ Liebesfreud
"Carmen" Fantasy/La plus qua tents
Charles Gerhardt/National Philharmonic
RCA RED SEAL

I

n n RED SEAL I

A James Galway Festival:

A MT

UotM Jazz Banc
M=C:It.h o PRnimincn

Magazine

Dancing

I

I - I PPrfrrmgrs o Mrowig~Q

I

I

lki

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