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February 13, 1981 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-02-13

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, February 13, 1981-Page 3
MISSING TEEN-A GER SAFE:

Cinema I1
presents
TONIGHT, Friday the 13th 7:00 & 9:00

Atlanta

youth

home

Aud. A, Angel

ATLANTS, Ga. (UPI)-A black teen-
ger-who authorities feared might be
te 19th child missing in a string of
murders and disappearances was
reported safe yesterday.
The youth most recently reported
nissing, Lorenzo Henderson, 15, who
ailed to reach home from school Wed-

nesday, got home late yesterday
unharmed.
ANGELO FUSTER, a spokesman for
Mayor Maynard Jackson, said, "I don't
know where he was and why he didn't
return sooner, but he is home." He did
not elaborate.
Responding to growing tensions over

the 19-month string of 15 killings with
three other children missing, Jackson
noted that similar mass murders have,
been solved only by a "fluke."
"They never caught the Columbus
strangler and they caught Son of Sam
on a traffic fluke," Jackson said. "They
caught the Yorkshire ripper on a traffic
fluke, in many ways. There's no way to
Students oj

say when the cases will be solved, but
we're confident that they will be
solved."
Public Safety Commissioner Lee
Brown said Deputy Police Chief Morris
Redding, a veteran investigator, had
been placed in charge of the 35-man
team, replacing Major W.J. Taylor.
rganize to

OBSESSION
(Brian DePalma, 1976) DePaima's tribute to Hitchcock tells the story of
Michael Courtland (CLIFF ROBERTSON), an ambitious New Orleans business-
man, and his obsessive gbjilt for the deaths of his wife and daughter. Six-
teen years after their deaths, he meets a young Italian woman who is the
image of his dead wife. Like the James Stewart character in VERTIGO, Mi-
chael sets out to turn the woman (GENEVIEVE BUJOLD) into his dead wife. By
the director of CARRIE AND DRESSED TO KILL. (98 min.)

SATURDAY, Feb. 14 8:00 p.m.
SUNDAY, Feb. 15, 2:00 p.m. & 8:00 p.m.

Aud. A, Angell

HAPPENINGS-
FILMS
AAFC -11th Annual 8mm Film Festival, 7,9p.m., SEB Schorling Aud.
AAFC - If ... . , 7 p.m., Performance, 9 p.m., MLB 4.
Alternative Action Films - Frenzy, 7 p.m., Family Plot, 9:15 p.m., Nat.
Sci. Aud.
Cinema Guild - Arabian Nights, 7,9:45 p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
Cinema II - Obsession, 7, 9p.m., Angell Hall Aud. A.
Gargoyle Films - Adam's Rib, 7, 9p.m., 100 Hutchins Hall.
SPEAKERS
Guild House - Marc Breakstone, "Student Government as a Vehicle for
Political and Social Change within the University," 12 noon, 802 Monroe.
Nat. Resources - John Vance, "Is the Small Landowner Problem Un-
solvable?," 3-5 p.m., 1040 Dana.
Linguistics, English Lang. Inst. - Paul Schachter, "On the Universals of
World Order and Generative Grammar," 4 p.m., 3032 Frieze.
S. and S. E. Asian Studies - Ngo Vinh Long, "Vietnamese Village Life Af-
tpr Today," 4 p.m., 200 Lane Hall.
Architecture and Urban Planning - Carl Levin, "A Courageous Design:
The Legacy of Wallenberg," 8 p.m., Hale Aud.
International Center, Extension Service - World Horizons Series, William
Butler, Switzerland Today, 7:30 p.m., MLB 3.
B"Musical Theatre in 18th-Century America," Cynthia Hoover, 4 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheatre.
PERFORMANCES
'U' Club - Happy Hour, live band, dancing, food until 8 p.m., 4 p.m.-1
a.m., Union.
Canterbury Loft - "Happy Days," 8p.m., 332 S. State.
Dratman Theater Co. - "Curse of the Starving Class," 8 p.m., SEB
Schorling Aud.
PTP Theater and Drama - "I Can't Hear the Birds Singing," 8 p.m.,
Power genter.
Ark -\Debby McClatchy, banjo player, 9 p.m., 1421 hill.
Michigan Theatre - "Valentine Vaudeville Show," live performances and
the film It Happened One Night, 7:30 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
The Saline Area Players - "George M!,"8 p.m., Saline High School Aud.
The Ann Arbor Chamber Orchestra - Dessert Concert, Carl Daehler, dir.,
8 p.m., Michigan League Ballroom.
MEETINGS
SWE - Pre-Interview Program, Hewlett Packard, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.,
270 W. Engin.
S. and S.E. Asian Studies - Ngo Vinh Long, "Travels in Vietnam", 12
p.m., Lane Hall Commons.
International Student Fellowship - Dinner meeting, 6:30 p.m., 4100 Nixon
Road.
Ann Arbor Chinese Bible Class - 7:30-9:30 p.m., 730 Tappan.
U. Duplicate Bridge Club - game, 7:30 p.m., Michigan League, Hender-
son Rm.
University Lowbrow Astronomers - "Skies of the Andes," 7:30 p.m., 5006
Angell Hall.
MISCELLANEOUS
Gerontology - bag lunch lee., Toni Antonucci, "Social Support Across the
Life Span," 12 p.m., 502 E. Liberty Conf.
Immunology, Microbiol., CMB - Immunology Forum, Terence Rabbits,
"Human Antibody Genes," 2 p.m., Med. Sci. II North Lee. Hall.
Cross Currents - Workshop, Christine Balogh, "Discovering Authentic
Techniques: The Painting and Glazing of Hungarian Folk Pottery" 4-6
p.m., Ann Arbor Art Assn., 117 W. Liberty.
Hillel - Shabbat Services, 5:30 p.m., dinner, 7:15 p.m., reform disc. 8
p.m., 1429 Hill.
Meekreh - Shabbat dinner, 5:30 p.m., Markley Concourse Lounge.
Rec. Sports - International Rec. Program, 7-10 p.m., Coliseum.
Wholistic Health Council - workshop, Lorna Zilba, "Physio-Psychic Dyn-
amics," 7:30 p.m., 602 E. Huron.
Int. Folk Dance Club -8 p.m.-12 a.m., teach, 8-9:30 p.m., CCRB Activities
Room.
Housing - "Black Popular Music and Dance 60s-80s," 1 p.m., South Quad
Pining Rm. 4.
Minority Women's Career Workshops -8 a.m.-12 p.m., 130 B LSA.
Marketing Club - Career Management Workshop, "Managing the Tran-
sition from School to Work," 4-5 p.m., Wolverine Rm., reception, 5-6 p.m.,
Executive Lounge.
Alpha Phi - Sucker sale to benefit Heart Association, 12 p.m.-dusk, Diag.
WCBN - On-the-Air fundraiser, 88.3 FM, 9 a.m. through Feb. 15.
WCBN- "City Limits," 6-6:30 p.m., "Environmental Issues," 6:30-7 p.m.
Washtenaw County Committee Against Registration and the Draft -
conference, "No Draft, No Registration" and "No U.S. Intervention," 7
p.m., Wayne State University.
Ann Arbor Women's Crisis Center - bucket drive to support the Center.

fight 'U' budget cuts

(Continued from Page 1)
tinuation of efforts on the part of
student government organizations to
address the budget cuts dilemma.
LSA-SG asked for student par-
ticipation on the geography review
board, but was told that students will
not be official members or have official
status.
The Michigan Student Assembly has
set up a committee to study the budget
cut situation and decide what plan of
action the assembly should take. The

committee disagrees with some aspects
of the discontinuance procedures and
opposes the lack of student par-
ticipation in the decision to review the
geography department. However,
members want to have more infor-
mation on the procedure before they
take any specific action.
MSA President Marc Breakstone said
yesterday he would like to see a "long,
hard look" at the University's discon-
tinuance procedures.

ANN ARBOR PREMIERE
DON GIOVANNI
(Joseph Losey, 1980) Under the aegis of Rolf Liebermann (director of the
Paris Opera), Joseph Losey has brought to the screen the ultimate master-
piece of Lorenzo DaPonte and W.A. Mozart. Mozart's opera depicts the life
and times of the legendary libertine, Don Giovanni (with some first-hand ad-
vice from DaPonte's good friend Casanova). This work has intrigued one
generation after another, unfolding new meanings each time it surfaces. Like
Bergman's THE MAGIC FLUTE, Losey's version of DON GIOVANNI is a true
cinematic experience.
Next weekend: BUGS BUNNY, THE BLUE DAHLIA,
THE BIG HEAT, WUTHERING HEIGHTS

DECISIONS: ACADEMIC PLANNING
WORSHO FR 1 ER UDENTS
Tuesday, February 17, 3-5 p.m.
UNDERSTAND your decision making style and ex-
plore alternative approaches.
FIND out what questions you should ask as you
make decisions about course elections.
SPONSORED BY: LSA Academic Counseling
OSS Counseling Services
PLEASE CALL 76-GUIDE to confirm your place, in
the workshop.
FREE to Students-Limited enrollment
CALL BY FEBRUARY 13

Sell Your Unwanteds
thru Daily Classifieds

FEBRUARY 17, 18 & 19 INTERVIEWS:
CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
FEBRUARY 17 & 18 INFORMATION TABLE
MICH IGA N UN ION DETROIT 31 3-226-7928

To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI., 48109.

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LSAT " GMAT " GRE
TEST PREPARATION CENTERS

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Although we have been in the test preparation business for
-many years, we are new in the Ann Arbor area. We are
convinced we have the finest test preparation course available -
superior instructors, superior materials and superior teaching
methods. But we have found that students tend to patronize the
oid 'stand-by' because they have heard the name around. We
would like to have the chance to prove we are better; to become
known as the quality test preparation service in Ann Arbor. We
are therefore willing to take a chance. On any course offered
between now and June, 1981, we offer the following guarantee:
r ararm
If you feel that we promised anything we did not deliver, or,
- If you feel our course materials are not up-to-date and reflec-
tive of the questions presented on the test, or
j - If you are unhappy with the score on the examination (unless

This young Alcoa engineer is shown
modifying a program on a programmable
controller, one of the tools he uses to
automate existing equipment.

Electrical Engineers, Mechanical Engineers,
Industrial Engineers, R&D, Safety
Alcoa Campus Recruitment
March 6
Contact University Placement Office for
available interview times

At Alcoa, engineering imagination and
creativity are vital resources. And that's what
we look for in entry-level engineers - people
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