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February 08, 1981 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-02-08

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, February 8, 1981-Page 7
Fewer ederal
dollars return
to Midwest

Engineering Duty Officer is the Navy's name for a man
whose specialty is ships and ship systems -running them,
designing them, building them. An EDO's career can take
him from sea duty to postgraduate study then on into his
own individual specialty-anything from hard-core prag-
matics to pure research.
Engineering Duty. If it sounds like your kind of job,
speak to: NAVAL ENGINEER
OPO Division Code AA
426 Clinton St., Detroit, Michigan 48226
or Call (313) 668-2204
NAVY OFFICER. IT'S NOT JUST A JOB, ITS AN ADVENTURE.

From AP and UPI reports
WASHINGTON - The flow of federal
tax dollars from the Northeast and
Midwest Frostbelt to the Sunbelt of the
South and West is slowing, the National
Journal said yesterday.
But Reagan administration policies,
especially sharp increases in defense
spending, could channel even more
funds to the Sunbelt, according to the
weekly magazine.
MICHIGAN remained the biggest
loser, getting back 66 cents for every
dollar in 1979 tax payments, up from 65
cents in 1975. The big winner in 1979 was
New Mexico getting back $1.91 for
every dollar in tax payments.
Other than the community develop-
ment block grant program aimed at
helping so-called Frostbelt cities in the
,Northeast and Midwest, the gover-
nment has not adjusted formulas to
help one region or another.
"instead, the flow of funds is a largely
accidental consequence of the way the
federal government raises and spends
its money. Defense spending goes
where the military bases and defense
contractors are; spending for the

elderly is concentrated in Florida.
Similarly, tax revenue is greatest in
regions where income is highest," the
Journal said.
NEW ENGLAND registered the
biggest gain in return from the federal
government, according to the Journal.
In 1975, New England got back 96 cen-
ts for every tax dollarsent to
Washington, while in 1979 the return
was $1.09 per dollar, it said.
By contrast, the Pacific Coast states
dropped from a $1.17 per $1 return in
1975 to a virtually break-even point four
years later.
BUT THE publication reported that
the Great Lakes region was an excep-
tion to the trend with return on the
dollar rising only from 70 cents to 71
cents over the period.
The imbalance in spending among
regions has been a sore point for years,
with officials in the Northeast and
Midwest particularly vocal on the sub-
ject.
The South's positive balance grew
from $11.5 billion in 1975 to $16 billion in
1979, while the-Great Lakes deficit grew
from $18.6 billion to $27.5 billion.

TAKE THE LEAD

I

Daily Photo by PAUL ENGSTROM
P
Food for thought
An unidentified campus squirrel feasts on a stray doughnut. He must've
been tired of all those nuts.

Help New Students Discover
the Diversity of Michigan
BE A FALL
ORIENTA TION
LEADER
Pick up applications at the
Orientation Office (2530 SAB) or call
764-6290 for further information.
an affirmative action non-discriminatory employer
Applications Due Tuesday, February 10

BIDGET DIRECTOR DEMANDS LESS U.S. SUPPOR T:

Foreign aid low on spending list

WASHINGTON (AP)-Selfish or ex-
travagant? The U.S. foreign aid policy
is viewed both ways. But in recent
years, the number of critics has been
growing, while defenders are in retreat.
Probably no one has gone after
foreign aid like the Reagan ad-
ministration's new budget director,
David Stockman, who tried to whack
$2.6 billion out of the $8 billion former
President Carter wanted Congress to
approve for fiscal 1982.
WHILE THE final cut likely will be
less, Stockman's proposal shows how
far foreign aid has fallen on the nation's
list of priorities.
Robert McNamara, the outgoing
president of the World Bank, claimed
last year that the U.S. aid effort has
been disgraceful, and that was when
Democrats controlled Congress and the
White House.
U.S. foreign aid totals about one-fifth
of 1 percent of the .nation's gross
national product, less than almost any
other major non-communist industrial
nation. Congress has not approved a

foreign aid bill for two years, main-
taining funding close to levels of three
years ago.
FORMER Secretary of State Ed-
mund Muskie, before leaving office,
said Congress has been "short-sighted"
and "stingy." He said the nation now
provides less aid than 10 years ago, af-
ter discounting for inflation.
Foreign aid does have some powerful
support in the Reagan administration
from Secretary of State Alexander
Haig, who so far has held off Stock-
man's budget ax.
Haig said at a news conference he
hopes others will recognize that foreign
aid "is sometimes a very cost-effective
vehicle for insuring thatthe ideals and
interests of this country are carried out
effectively abroad."
IT IS OFTEN difficult to sort out
where the money goes and for what
purpose.
Americans are traditionally sym-
pathetic to the world's poor, but of the
$8 billion that Carter requested for
foreign aid in 1982, less than $2.5 billion

would provide humantarian aid to the
poorest nations.
Most of the rest is given for political
reasons, although some of that ends up
helping the poor, too.
For example, Israel, not usually
thought of as a poor nation, received
about $2.2 billion in the fiscal 1981
budget, while Egypt received $1.3
billion. They are likely to receive at
least that much again in 1982.
Aid that supports political objectives
is not targeted for big cuts by Stock-
man's Office of Management and
Budget: "The reductions in aid would
mainly affect the poorer countries of
Africa and the Asian subcontinent," an
0MB report said.
"Iy" SUMMER CAMPS
The Ann Arbor Y is now accept-
ing applications for staff posi-
tions at the following camps:
CAMP AL-GON-QUiAN; a resident
camp for boys and girls located on Burt Lake in
northern Mich. Camp dates are June 22 to August
8. Senior staff positions, ages 18 and above ore
available in the following areas: horseback rid-
ing, sailing, canoeing, arts and crafts, trips direc-
tor, archery, nature, woodworking, riflery, land
sports, swimming and water skiing. Salary plus
roomand board.
CAMPiRKETT: A day camp for boys and
girls located on Silver lake near Pinckney. Camp
dates are June 22-August 21. Senior staff
positions, ages 18 and above are available in the
following areas: Archery, swimming, sailing,
canoeing, arts and crafts, and nature.
Applications and additional in-
formation regarding positions at
both camps may be obtained by
contacting the Ann Arbor Y. 350
South Fifth Ave. Ann Arbor or
cailing (313) 663-0536.

I-

STUDENTS
FACULTY,
STAFF
NOMINATE OUTSTANDING TEACHERS, RESEARCHERS,
AND COUNSELORS FOR A FACULTY AWARD:
ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: For Associate and Full Pro-
fessors

Stockman
.wants foreign aid cut

RECOGNITION AWARD: For Assistant,
and Junior Full Professors.

Associate,

First time at
legislative
bat' brings
Reagan win
(Continued from Page 1)
the task of doing so," said James Baker
III, Reagan's chief of staff. "he's cam-
paigned for president for some time
and he's extremely pleased to now be in
a position to put his beliefs into action."
Baker cited as "vintage Ronald
Reagan" the president's freeze on
federal hiring, imposed as his first of-
ficial act; the suspension of all pending
federal regulations; the immediate
decontrol of domestic crude oil prices;
and directives to department heads to
cut back official travel; the use of out-
side consultants, and the purchase of
new office furniture.
HIS FIRST DAYS in the White House
also are creating some upheaval: The
federal hiring freeze and regulation
suspensions are being challenged by
critics as largely symbolic, unfair, and
perhaps inadequately researched.
nj

oriental food to
FORM
F

Take out

N
ERLY LUCKY JIM'S
ISN-N-CHIPS

AMOCO OUTSTANDING TEACHER AWARD: For Reg-
ular Faculty Who Have Demonstrated Excel-
lence in Undergraduate Teaching.
TEACHING ASSISTANT AWARD: For Effective and
Creative Graduate Teaching Assistants.
SEE YOUR DEPARTMENT CHAIR FOR NOMINATION FORMS
OR CALL 763-1283
ALL NOMINATIONS DUE: FEBRUARY 20, 1981

4

1232 PACKARD 994-3151
open Mon-Sat, 11-9 Sun,3-9

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YES, I am interested in sending a Valentine's Day
Message through the DAILY Classifieds.

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DEADLINE:
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Thursday,
Feb. 12, 1981

VEILENTINME MESSAGtE:
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3

come in out of the cold ...
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