100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 07, 1981 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-02-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.#'r..

i

Page 8-Saturday, February 7, 1981-The Michigan Daily

Haig moves to establish
foreign policy authority .

WASHINGTON (AP)-Secretary of
State Alexander Haig is moving with
considerable speed to establish his
authority over anything dealing with
the nation's foreign policy, short of the
president himself.
Just two weeks after taking office,
Haig already has made his influence
felt in the following ways:
" He fought off attempts by Budget
Director David Stockman to initiate
deep cuts in foreign aid.
" He persuaded President Reagan to
wait a while longer before deciding
whether to lift the grain embargo
against the Soviets.
" He has reassured the nation's allies
that recent remarks favoring the
-neutron warhead by Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger did not mean there
has been a change in the policy
espoused by the Carter administration
of opposing the warhead.
IN ALL CASES, Haig was swimming
against the current of the Reagan ad-
ministration, which came to office
pledging to slash spending the lift the

grain embargo. The Republican party
platform, which Reagan endorsed,
called for deploying the neutron
warhead after consultation with U.S.
allies.
Haig said during his confirmation
hearings that he wouldn't be bound by
everything in the party platform
because he didn't have a role in draf-
ting it.
Since Reagan took office on Jan. 20, a
great deal of attention has been focused
on Stockman's efforts to cut federal
spending. There is unquestionably a
great deal of support for this among
both Republicans and Democrats.
So it must have seemed like a safe bet
to propose cutting former President
Carter's $8 billion aid proposal for
fiscal 1982 by $2.6 billion.
BUT HAIG WAS quick to signal his
opposition. "I hope that we are going to
be able to get a recognition that both
foreign assistance and foreign security
assistance is sometimes a very cost-
effective vehicle for insuring that the
ideals and interests of this country are

carried out effectively abroad," he
said.
The next day, the OMB plan was
leaked to the press. The nation's allies
protested, and Haig took these protests
and his own views to a Cabinet meeting
where the cuts were shelved for the
time being.
Some cuts are still likely, the State
Department concedes, but nothing like
Stockman wanted.
THE CABINET'S decision to delay a
decision on lifting the grain embargo
also reflected Haig's influence. During
the campaign, Reagan had said the
embargo was ineffective and unfair to
farmers and that he would lift it, if elec-
ted.
Haig's view is that the embargo has
damaged the Soviet economy. State
Department officials have argued in in-,
terviews that the embargo contributed
to a 3 percent decline in Soviet meat
production last year.
The feeling at the State Department
now is that the embargo will be left in
place for some time.

AP Photo

Wish you were here
While soaking up the sun in his winter resort, this Vilas Park Zoo polar bear extends a friendly invitation to all takers.

U_

ABENG PRESENTS
The 7th ANNUAL MINORITY
FARTS & CULTURAL FESTIVAL
February 5,6, 7. 1981

Soviet news media attacks Polish union

Saturday, Feb. 7
ART EXHIBIT 10:00 AM-6:00 PM-Room 126
FRATERNITY/SORORITY EXHIBIT- :00 PM-3:00 PM-Room 124
POETRY READING 3:00 PM-Benzinger Library
FASHION/PERFORMING ARTS SHOW-Clothes provided by:
The Alcove, Herman's World of Sporting Goods,
Merry-Go-Round, Sklaar's international, Renaissance.
Music by: STILL-BILL 3:00 PM-RC Auditorium
All events will be held at EAST QUAD
and will be FREE of charge
Co-sponsored by the East Quad Rap., Assembly, U of M Housing Special
Programs, MSA, & The Residential College.

TAKE THE. LEAD~
Help New Students Discover
the Diversity of Michigan
BE A FALL
ORIENTATION
LEADER
Pick up applications at the
Orientation Office (2530 SAB) or call
764-6290 for further information.
* an affirmative action non-discriminatory employer *
Applications Due Tuesday, February 10

BONN, West Germany (AP) - Soviet
bloc news media have stepped up their
attacks on Poland's independent union
in what appears to be a sign of growing
impatience with the Warsaw gover-
nment's inability to end the labor crisis.
Some Western diplomats feel the new
attacks, which have appeared most
prominently in the Soviet and East
German press, will increase pressure
on Polish Communist Party leader
Stanislaw Kania to rein in the union
Solidarity, which claims to have 10
million members.
The labor unrest that has gripped
Poland since last summer and
relations with the independent union
are expected to be among the topics
when the party's Central Committee
meets Monday in Warsaw.
THE OFFICIAL Soviet news agency
Tass stepped up the barrage yesterday
accusing "counter-revolutionaries"
and "right-wing" leaders of Solidarity
of launching a "frontal attack on the
party and people's power, trying to un-
dermine the country's economy still
further, and to complicate the life of all
citizens in Poland."
Tass's charges followed by one day a
tough commentary in the East German
news agency ADN, which accused the
Solidarity leadership itself of following
LSAT GRE
GMAT
TEST PREPARATION
The finest preparation
courses available
Classes for
Xton Feb. 21st
rducatioa, LSAT begin
C.enter Feb. 8th
Call or write for more information
32466 Olde Franklin Drive
Farmington Hills. MI 48018
(313) 851-2969
CLASSES IN ANN ARBOR " DETROITO
E. LANSING

"a counterrevolutionary course"
aimed at subverting the authority of the
Communist Party and state.
Previous East German commen-
taries charged that the dissident Com-
mittee for Social Self-Defense and
others it called counterrevolutionaries
were trying to infiltrate Solidarity.
BUT THE EAST Germans had
refrained from labeling Solidarities
leaders as counter-revolutionaries -
one of the harshest criticisms of Com-
munist ideology. The Kremlin

described its 1956 suppression of the
Hungarians and the 1968 incursion into
Czechoslovakia as moves against coun-
terrevolutionaries.
Reports of Soviet and other East bloc
troops massed near Poland's borders
have raised Western fears that Poland
could meet a similar fate.
Czechoslovakia's party daily Rude
Pravo has claimed Solidarity leader
Lech Walesa embarked on a more
radical course after his meeting in the
Vatican last month with Polish-born

Pope John Paul II. Most of Poland's
35.4 million people A are Catholics.
"This idea that the leadership is
counterrevolutionary tends to discredit
Kania and his policy of dealing with
Solidarity," said one Western diplomat
with long experience in Polish affairs.
East Germany's official Communist
daily Neues Deutschland quoted the
Polish army paper Zolnierz Wolnosci as
claiming the United States was using
the labor crisis to undermine Poland's
links with other communist countries.

0

Daily Photo y DAVID HARRIS
VICE PRESIDENT FOR University Relations and Development Michael Radock reflects upon his 20 years at the
University. Yesterday Radock announced his retirement slated for the end of this year.

Radoek announces

(Continued from Page 1)
ONE PROBLEM Radock noted,
however, is that only about 25 percent
of University alumni donate, com-
pared to 75 percent for the major
private institutions.
Under Radock's direction, the
University received more than $37
million in the 1978-79 academic year

along. He is quick to give the credit for
the University's outstanding perfor-
mance in ,gathering funds to a
dedicated staff, faculty, and alumni, in
addtion to the University's prestige.
He described his own work as that of
a "catalyst or a marriage broker." He
said he tries to match the needs of the
University with the appropriate donor.
His job is to identify the donors and

FOLD BACK THIS FLAP & SEAL WITH TAPE

mr

FROM
The Michigan Daily
420 Maynard
Ann Arbor, MI 48109

1 PLACE YOUR AD IN THEt
It
I Ft
Summer Sublet Supplement t
t APPEARING MARCH 29, 1981,
* I
t
I Name
Address
I I
I ~~~~~~~~Phone ______________
I t
t t
t Cost: $12.00 t
t before 5 p.m., March 2 t
t ($14 from March 3-23)
I I
IMake checks payable to t

esignation
solicit funds.
"FUNDRAISING is 90 percent
research and only 10 percent
solicitation} here. At many schools, it's
just the reverse," explained the vice
president.
One "pheomenon" which makes
Radock feel optimistic about the
University's future, he said, is the
faculty and student interest in raising
funds. He said members of the Univer-
sity community ask "how they can
help."
Radock came to the University in
1961 after serving as manager for
educational affairs at Ford Motor Co.
He previously taught at Kent State
University, Westminster College and
the University of Wyoming.
The vice president will not leave his
post until a successor is found, and
plans to remain at the University as a
professor of communications and
special advisor to President Harold
Shapiro.
Shapiro said a committee will be
formed next week to conduct a nation-
wide search for Radock's successor.

"y" SUMMER CAMPS
The Ann Arbor Y Is now accept-
Ing applications for staff posi-
tions at the following camps:
CAMP AL-GON-QUIAN; a resident
camp for boys and girls located on Burt Lake in
northern Mich. Camp dates are fune 22 to August
8. Senior staff positions, ages 18 and above are
available in the following areas: horseback rid.

1

Al

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan