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February 07, 1981 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-02-07

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, February 7, 1981-Page 3
Citizens enraged

over n
By DEBI DAVIS
The state's controversial halfway
house program came under fire Thur-
sday night when about 125 concerned
citizens met with Michigan Department
of Corrections officials to discuss the
community residential program, which
places pre-parole prisoners in the
community to ease their transition
back into society.
Most of the two dozen citizens who
spoke at the meeting were violently op-
posed to the proposed corrections
facility, and many questioned the way
the entire community residential
program has been run.
THE COMMUNITY residential
program consists of several phases of
institutionalization for pre-parole
prisoners. A corrections facility, the
most heavily guarded of the three
types, provides 24-hour supervision of
the prisoners.
A halfway house, or resident home,
as it is called by the DOC, has fewer
restrictions than a corrections facility.
Prisoners must report weekly to a field
agent and be in each night by a
specified curfew.
FINALLY, THERE is extended
furlough, the level of least supervision,
in which a prisoner lives with friends or
family in the community. He or she
must also report weekly to a field
agent, but curfews are less strict
because "spot checks" are less
frequent.
In all three types of pre-release
situations the prisoners are required to
have a job or be actively seeking em-
ployment.
City Administrator Terry Sprenkel
charged Thursday night that the state
has run an "unsafe, haphazard"

aif way
operation without adequate super-
vision. He also objected to the state's
disregard for the local community,
saying that John Gellick, supervisor of
the Ann Arbor resident home program,
has failed to notify the police of the
number, location and status of
prisoners in the program.
GELLICK DENIED the charge,
saying that, as a former police officer,
he recognizes the need to inform local
police, and has always done so.
Others present at the three-hour

house
has forced the DOC to expedite
placement of prisoners in the com-
munity program.
CITY COUNCILMAN Earl Greene
(D-2nd Ward) said, "We are absolutely
outraged that you (DOC) bring people
into the community who are going to
kill and maim us." Greene was
referring to a December murder and
January restaurant robbery, both
allegedly committed by halfway house
residents.
Richard Bailey, father of the young
woman who was killed in the December

'We are absolutely outraged that you (the

DOC) bring people
who are going to kill

into

the community

AP Photo
Dinner is served
r This snow statue captured first prize for the members of Delta Sigma Phi fraternity at Michigan Technological Univer-
sity's annual Winter Carnival. This is the fourth first-place win in a row for the fraternity.
5R AmtLrak Saturday mail
face Reagan ' budget ax

and maim us.
-Earl Greene,
city councilman

meeting objected to the past record of
halfway houses in the city.
In Ann Arbor, all of the ap-
proximately 80 pre-parole prisoners are
either living in one of the three existing
halfway houses or are on extended
furlough. The DOC hopes to establish a
centralized corrections facility at 1700
Broadway which would house ap-
proximately 70 prisoners.
WILLIAM KIME, a corrections
department representative from Lan-
sing, said Thursday, "The 70 prisoners
are already in the community. The
question is, how are they going to be
housed?"
He added that prison overcrowding

WASHINGTON (AP) - Saturday
mail deliveries, Amtrak train service,
and urban programs - survivors of last
year's spending cuts - face a new
threat from President Reagan's budget.
ax, according to internal ad-
ministration documents obtained
yesterday.
The documents, listing a wide range
of possible spending reductions, were
prepared by budget director David
Stockman, and contain plans for
slashing the budget in nearly every
major area outside the military.
THE DOCUMENTS, some of which
were made available to The Associated
Press, focus heavily on social progar-
ms, including Medicaid, Social

Security, food stamps, unemployment
insurance, welfare, and housing.
But they also target cuts in programs
for transportation, energy, rural areas,
space exploration, and urban economic
development.
Republican congressional sources
said Stockman was particularly in-
terested in finding cuts in programs
that benefit business, so as to avoid the
appearance that the poor will bear the
brunt of budget reductions.
"THE ADMINISTRATION is trying
to put together a picture of basic fair-
ness intwhich everybody's sacred cows
are affected," said one GOP budget of-
ficial, who asked not to be named.
Reagan plans to review Stockman's

APPEN INGS
FILMS
AAFC - Allegro Non Troppo, 7, 10:20 p.m., Robert Breer Animation
Night, 8:40 p.m., MLB 4.
Alt. Action Films - The Rose, 7, 9:30 p.m., MLB 3.
Cinema Guild - Willie and Phil, 7,9:05 p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
Cinema II- Edvard Munch, 7, 10 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Classic Film Theatre - Take the Money and Run, 1, 4, 7, 10 p.m., Where's
Poppa?, 2:30, 5:30, 8:30, Michigan Theatre.
Mediatrics - Dirty Harry, 7 p.m., The Eiger Sanction, 9:10 p.m., Nat. Sci.
Aud.
PERFORMANCES
Abeng - 7th Annual Minority Arts & Cultural Festival, Poetry Reading, 3
p.m., Benzinger Library, Fashion/Performing Arts Show, 8 p.m., RC
Auditorium.
School of Music - Contemporary Directions Ensemble, Carl St. Clair,
cond., 8p.m., Rackham.
U. Musical Society - Pianist Oxana Yablonskaya, 8:30 p.m., Hill Aud.
Music for Solo Piano - Amy Fynck performing works by DeBussy,
Beethoven, Haydn and Ravel, 8:30 p.m., First Unitarian Church, Recital
Hall, 1917 Washtenaw.
MISCELLANEOUS
Alpha Delta Pi Sorority - Rockathon for Ronald McDonald House, 8 a.m.-
8p-.m., Mott Children's Hospital.
Rec. Sports - Children's Sports-O-Rama, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., NCRB.
Abeng - 7th Annual Minority Arts and Cultural Festival, Art Exhibit, 10
a.m.-6 p,m., EQ, Frat./Sorority Exhibit, 1-3 p.m., East Quad.
Exhibit Museum Planetarium, "Cosmos: The Voyage to the Stars",
narrated by Dr. Carl Sagan, 10:30, 11:45 a.m., 1:30, 2:45, 4 p.m., Ruthven
Museum.
Children's Community Center - benefit Mexican Dinner and Coffee
House, 5-11 p.m., Halfway Inn, Church St.
Asian Amer. Assn. & Chinese Students Assn. - Lunar New Year
Celebration, dinner, variety show, 6:30 p.m., South Quad.
Computing Ctr. - Bob Blue, "MTS File Editing and MTS I/O", 7-9 p.m.,
2003 Angell.
International Center - Japan Club Party, 7 p.m., International Center.
Folklore Society - Contra/Square dance, all dances taught, 8 p.m.-
midnight, Mich. Union.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI., 48109.
SAMICHIGAN
STUDENT
SEMBLY
IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR THE POSITIONS OF:
ELECTION DIRECTOR
Responsible for management and organization of campus-
wide MSA General Election for April 7 & 8, 1981.

budget proposals early next week
before he sends his spending cut
package to Congress Feb. 18. The cuts
are expected to total $40 billion to $50
billion for fiscal 1982, which starts Oct.
1
Speaker Thomas O'Neill told repor-
ters yesterday he will try to block any
Reagan cutbacks that would harm the
poor. "They'll have me watching out
for them," he said.
O'NEILL SAID he would cooperate in
correcting "inequities in government,"
but would not preside over dismantling
of social welfare programs and allow
the government to "exploit the many
for the profits of a selfish few."
Among the proposed spending cuts
that would affect business - as well as
the general public - is a recommen-
dation to reduce the proposed postal
subsidies in former President Jimmy
Carter's 1982 budget from $1 billion to
$800 million.
The budget document notes that such
a change would almost certainly renew
the possibility the U.S. Postal Service
would eliminate Saturday mail
deliveries.
STOCKMAN ALSO is seeking
elimination of the Economic Develop-
ment Administration, which was
created to help economically distressed
areas by providing grants, loans, and
loan guarantees to attract private in-
vestment and new jobs.
Regional development commissions
would also be eliminated along with
several other urban grant programs for
an overall saving of $1.6 billion, the
documents show.
Spending on Amtrak and mass transit
programs would be sharply reduced.
STOCKMAN recommends cutting
Amtrak's subsidy by about one-third in
1982 and more in later years, with ex-
pected major reductions in train ser-
vice and dramatically higher fares.
"To sharply reduce federal subsidies,
routes and trains should be dropped if
they don't meet a strirgent threshhold
test" of profitability, the documents
said.
The new tests, which would require
trains to cover 50 percent of their costs
in 1982 and 80 percent by 1985, would
eliminate more than half of Amtrak's
routes outside the Northeast.

State unemployment
rate rises sharply

DETROIT (UPI) - Michigan's
unemployment rate rose sharply from
12.2 percent in December to 13.7 per-
cent in January due chiefly to the con-
tinuing slump in the auto industry, the
Michigan Employment Security Com-
mission said yesterday.
MESC Director S: Martin Taylor said
the 1.5 percent increase gave Michigan
its highest January jobless rate since
1975, when the figure also hit 13.7 per-
cent.
THE NUMBER OF unemployed
workers across the state rose by 61,600,
from 524,000 in December to 585,000 last
month, the MESC said. A year ago,
Michigan's January unemployment
rate was 10.3 percent with 439,000 out of
work.
Yesterday's announcement was un-
welcome news to state officials.
"Although some increase in unem-
ployment is normal in January, the
current, increase is fairly substantial,
especially when you consider thattwe
have had double-digit unemployment
since January of last year," Taylor
said.
Taylor attributed the increase in
unemployment to layoffs in the auto in-
dustry along with seasonal job losses in
construction and retail trade as many
who held temporary holiday jobs joined
the ranks of the unemployed in
January.
NATIONALLY, the unemployment
rate remained unchanged at 7.4 percent
in January, with 7,847,000 out of work.

In Lansing, state Budget Director
Gerald Miller noted the MESC figures
were not seasonally adjusted and said
the adjusted figures might show an
actual increase of only .8 percent.
"More important is the number of
employed and the number of unem-
ployed," Miller said. "January is
always up - that's not unexpected. We
expected to have a weak first quarter
and we're going to have a weak first
quarter."
President Abraham Lincoln was shot
by assassin John Wilkes Booth in 1865.

murder, said the program has been run
by "profiteers" who wish to make
money at the expense of the com-
munity.
But Louis Rome, owner of three for-
mer halfway houses, including the one
in which the alleged murderer Timothy
Hughes lived, said he "went in the red"
operating his homes as halfway house
facilities.
ROME'S HALFWAY houses were
closed shortly after the murder when
his staff resigned. Roger Schoultz, one
of Rome's staff members sasid in an
interview yesterday the staff resigned
,because of a lack of security, whih
should be provided by the DOC.
"The officers came around at the
same time every night," Schoultz said.
Schoultz said some of the men were
out all night, only returning for bed
checks. "Even if they weren't in bed,
frequently nothing was done," he said.

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