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February 05, 1981 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-02-05

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, February 5, 1981-Page 5

Reagan lobbies for

budget cuts

From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON - President Reagan,
trying to build a foundation of
*ongressional support for politically un-
popular budget cuts, made an extraor-
dinary trip to Capitol Hill yesterday to
sell his case to Senate and House
leaders.
Today he will begin his effort to sell
the programs to the American public,
with a televised speech to the nation.
White House press secretary James
Brady said the address was undergoing
"substantial rewriting" by the
*president.
THE PRESIDENT has come under
increasing pressure to assauge fears
that his efforts to stem the growth of the,
foderal budget will not be made at the
expense of the poor and most needy in
thenation.
As he returned to the White House af-
ter the 75-minute discussion on Capitol
Hill, Reagan said, "It was a good
meeting, just to extablish a base."
Some Republican congressmembers
this week received a preliminary list of
proposed cuts for the rest of fiscal 1981
and for 1982. But Reagan himself did
not discuss his upcoming economic
package at yesterday's meeting of
House and Senate leaders from both
parties.
ONE MEMBER who attended the
meeting with Reagan said the president
only repeated he would send the
package to Congress Feb. 18. He said
Reagan "stressed that he wasn't cut-
ting the size of the budget but the in-
crease in the size of the budget," now
projected at about $740 billion for fiscal
1982 starting Oct. 1.
The administration has targeted for
deep cuts next year many popular
social programs that pay benefits to in-
dividuals, and also will propose a
reduction in grants to state and local
governments, congressional sources
said.
Among the social programs are food
stamps, extended unemployment
benefits, public service jobs, child
nutrition and Medicaid.
SOURCES SAID the Reagan list calls
Study says
*test tube
conception

Attention
All Bookworms:
Now that your
midterms
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764-0558
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5th Ave at Liberty 761-4700
LAST
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A Film
by Akira
Kurosawa

PRESIDENT REAGAN met yesterday with bipartisan congressional leaders in an effort to gain support for proposed budget cuts. From left .AP Photo
are: Senate Majority Whip Ted Stevens of Alaska, House Speaker Tip O'Neill, Reagan, Senate Majority Leader Howard Baker of Tennessee,
and Senate Minority Leader Robert Byrd of West Virginia.

THE SHADOW WARRIOR
Thurs., Fri-6:30 9:15

for cutting grants to states and local
communities by 15 to 20 percent and
distributing the aid as block grants,
rather than for a variety of categorical
programs, such as transportation and
urban development. Not all, those
changes would take place in 1982.
It calls for a major change in the
trade adjustment assistance program,
which ballooned to $3 billion from about
$300 million mostly to help steel and
auto workers who lost jobs because of

foreign imports.
Benefits would not be available
unless unemployment benefits were
exhausted, sources said. That would all
but eliminate the program.
EXTENDED unemployment
benefits, which jobless workers receive
after 26 weeks of regular benefits end,
would also be reduced.
White House deputy press secretary
Larry Speakes said the president told
the lawmakers: "We're in a difficult

situation. We need the support of the
American people. We need the support
of the Congress."
The president has come under in-
creasing pressure to assauge fears that
his efforts to stem the growth of the
federal budget will not be made at the
expense of the poor and most needy.
BRADY SAID the president, in for-
mulating his economic program, was
trying to "weed out the greedy to help
the needy."

"No programs that are a safety net
for the poor, the indigent and the truly
needy are going to be eliminated," he
said.
Senate Republican Leader Howard
Baker of Tennessee left the Capitol
meeting with Reagan saying, "I'm
convinced the president will propose
tax relief and spending cuts together."
He said Reagan left no doubt "there
will be linkage between a tax cut on one
hand and spending cuts on the other."

U

WITH THIS ENTIRE AD
one admission $2.00 any film
Good Mon. thru Thurs. Eves
vid thru 2-5-81 "H"

I

Iran tries American
journalist as spy

STARTS TOMORROW
UILY TOMUIN
AN EPIC COMEDY
THE
INCREDIBLE
SHRINKING
WOMAN
Fri-8:00, 9:50
FINAL 2 WKS
A ROBERT ALTMAN
FILM
' k (P0) "s
Thurs-6:30, 8:30
Fri-6:00

9
k

risky

ry e,

(Continued from Page 1)
California, were not involved in
negotiations to free the 52 Americans
seized in the U.S. Embassy takeover
Nov. 4; 1979.
The Swiss diplomat who attended the
trial, Wilhelm Schmid, was reached by
The Associated Press by telephone in
Tehran and said Dwyer "was very hap-
py to see and learn that finally there
seems to be some sort of decision about
her case."
He said she was charged with
"spying - acting against the best in-
terests of the Islamic Republic of Iran.
In the event she is released, we will do

everything in our power to help with the
arrangements for leaving the country."
He said information on release of
Sobhani had come from Sobhani's
brother in Los Angeles.
Morris Sobhani said) his -brother
married an Iranian wonanin Tehran
and that the family had no information
on whether the freed man would return
to the United States.
According to the State Department
there was no new information on a third
U.S. citizen in Iranian custody, Zia
Nassri, who was born in Afghanistan.
There was no information on when he
was arrested or why he was held.

BOSTON (AP) - Conceiving babies
in test tubes could result in slightly
more birth defects, but the risk is so
small that the controversial procedure
may be a useful last resort for barren
couples, a Harvard study concludes.
The report cautions, however, that
the odds are slim that the procedure
will work and it should be used only af-
ter all other fertility treatments fail.
SO FAR, THREE children around the
world are known to have been con-
ceived in test tubes, then implanted into
their mothers' wombs.
The latest review of the procedure
was written by Dr. John Biggers of
Harvard Medical School and published
in today's issue of the New England
Journal of Medicine.
"The evidence suggests that the
danger of increased congenital defects
is not high," Biggers wrote. "The risk
seems considerably lower than that ac-
cepted by couples with a recessive
inherited defect who decide to have a
child even though they know that an
abnormal baby may be born."
THE DEFECT most likely to result
from test tube conception is an extra set
of chromosomes, Biggers said. But
when such embryos are transferred in-
to-their mothers' wombs, almost all die,
as they do in natural pregnancies.
The idea of test tube babies was first
spggested in an editorial - "Concep-
tion in a watch glass" - published 43
years ago in the New England Journal.
It was finally accomplished three years
ago, with the birth in England of Louise
Brown.
That test tube baby and one other bir-
th were the work of the two pioneers in
the field, Dr. Patrick Steptoe of Oldham
General Hospital in England and Dr.
Robert Edwards of Cambridge Univer-
sity. The third baby was fertilized by
doctors at the Royal We nen's Hospital
in Melbourne, Australia.
The only American test tube baby
clinic is at Eastern Virginia Medical
School, but that clinic has yet to
produce a baby.
"The chances of achieving pregnancy
even with repeated operations, are ex-
tremely small," Biggers wrote. Once a
woman has been chosen for the
procedure, the chances are 4 percent
that a single try will result in a birth.

MIDNGHTANN
ARBOR
THEATRES
CHEAP FLICKS
FRI & SAT

Dwyer
...'charged with espionage

Missing promoter fled threats;
cites bankers in boxing scandal

F'

Cheech & Chong's
p (R)
AT
I MIDNIGHT

;r
z
s
a
;
z
f

..
''.

LOS ANGELES (AP) - A man pur-
porting to be a missing boxing
promoter named in a $21.3 million bank
embezzlement suit says he fled the
country after his life was threatened
and his 4-year-old son was kidnapped
because "I learned too much."
He charged the scandal, involving
Muhammad Ali Professional Sports
Inc., actually involves dozens of of-
ficials of Wells Fargo Bank and as
much as $300 million over several
years.
THE MAN, identified in a radio in-
terview as promoter Howard Smith,
who had been missing for days after the
boxing scandal broke open, said he had
"come back to fight."
"I'm a fighter, and I don't run from
nothing," he said. "I'm not afraid to die
if I know what the purpose is."
Officials of San Francisco-based
Wells Fargo scoffed at the allegations
yesterday, calling them
"preposterous."
The bank Monday filed the civil em-
bezzlement suit against Smith, chair-
man of the sports promotion
organization known as MAPS, and
several other officials of the
organization that sponsored numerous
boxing matches and the annual
Muhammad Ali track meet.

MAPS HAS NO connections with Ali
other than the use of his name for a fee.
Since allegations of embezzlement sur-
faced last week, Ali has asked that his
name be dropped from the group's title.
The man identified as Smith told
KABC Sports Talk host Bud Furillo on
Tuesday that he retrieved his son from
kidnappers, then took his family to
Switzerland for their safety.
He told The New York Times that the
kidnappers threatened to kill the boy

AT MIDNIGHT
NIGHT FTHE
LIVING (R)
ALL SEATS $2.00

"for what I can tell." Asked who the
kidnappers were, the man told Furillo:
"Well, you can start at the Miracle Mile
District of Wells Fargo bank (on
Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles)
This thing involves bank officials."
FURILLO, A long-time Los Angeles
sports journalist, said he has dealt with
Smith in the past and is convinced the
caller was indeed Smith. Times sports
writer Michael Katz said he also
believed the man was Smith.

.........

POETRY READING
with
Carolyn Gregory
Don Mager, Jane Dobija
Reading from their works
7:30 p.m.
Thurs., February 5
Admission: FREE
GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE-662-5189

NOON LUNCHEON
Home-made Soup and Sandwich 754
Friday February 6th
Prof. TOM WEISSKOPF,
Dept. of Economics:
"Ronald Reagan meets the
Economic Crisis: What can
we expect?"
(Rescheduled from last Friday)

CINEMASET
PRESENTSI

TONIGHT

7:00 & 9:00

LORCH HALL

PANDORA'S BOX
(G. W. Pabst, 1928) The pioneering playwright, Franz Wedekind, idolized by
the young Germans of the early 20th century, stressed sexual frankness and
a Nietzchean will to power. His most remarkable creation is the female
world spirit, Lulu-amoral, bisexual, the ruiner of lives, and fated to meet her
oppressor, Jack the Ripper. A triumph of Expressionist art, with the haunt-
ingly beautiful Louise Brooks in her most ethereal performance. (110 min.)
FRIDAY, FEB. 6 7:00 & 9:00 AUD. A, ANGELL
LE CD C LI f"TDT LI LIT

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