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February 04, 1981 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-02-04

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Page 10-Wednesday, February 4, 1981-The Michigan Daily
Early returns on Michigan

Trac k'81

By RON POLLACK
Scores in Michigan's 1981 indoor
track meets and Jimmy Carter as
President share a common trait:
neither have been kept.
Despite the fact that team scores
have not been kept in any of the
Wolverines' meets thus far, an analysis
can be made as to how the individual
runners have been performing. The
following are the early returns on
Michigan Track '81.
FIELD EVENTS: The Wolverines'
James Ross (with a jump of 25'0"),
Vincent Bean (23'11") and Derek Har-
per (23'10") swept the first three places
in the long jump at last weekend's
Western Michigan Relays. At the
Michigan Relays, Ross landed 25'8/2"
away from his starting point. "It is
probably one of the better performan-
ces in the country at this time," said
Wolverine head coach Jack Harvey.
Michigan is well-represented in the
shot put by freshman John Nielsen,
whose longest toss of 58'10%" leaves

Shea makes NCAA's in
half-mile at M' Relays

him within striking distance of the
qualifying mark for nationals - 59'5".
Sophomore Phil Wells has been coming
along slowly this season.
"He threw better at the intersquad
meet than he has the last couple of
weeks," Harvey said. "He's had some
problems with his form, but when he
gets this straightened out, he'll be up
there with Nielsen."
Also suiting up for Michigan is Dave
Walmroth, whose throw of 49'81/2" ear-
ned him a fifth-place finish at Western
Michigan.
Freshman Dave Lugin, whose per-
sonal best in the high jump in high
school was 6'8", has shown tremendous
improvement, already recording a
jump of 7'3/4" this season. In another

field event, the triple jump, Mike Mur-
phy leaped 46'512" at Western
Michigan.
In the pole vault, Michigan's top per-'
former is Scott Koepke, who has soared
15'6" this year. "He's really going to
have to improve to help us in the Big
Ten meet," Harvey cautioned.
SPRINTERS AND HURDLERS: The
Wolverine sprinters are Andrew Bruce,
Butch Woolfolk and Chris Fitzpatrick.
Thus far, Harvey has been
"overracing" Bruce in the 400 meters.
so that he will be properly prepared for
the 300- and 60-yard dashes later in the
year. This past weekend Fitzpatrick
ran the 55-meter dash in 6.5 seconds and
doubled in the 55-meter high hurdles,
finishing in a time of 7.8.
In addition to Fitzpatrick, other
members of the Wolverines' hurdling
contingent are Shelby Johnson, Mar-
shall Parks, and Dave Hall. Johnson,
who also runs a leg of the mile relay, is
"running a lot better this season that
last season," according to Harvey. At
Western Michigan, Hall broke the tape
of the 55-meter high hurdles in the time
of 7.7.
Both Parks and Woolfolk are trying to
overcome the same problem this year,
as they attempt to "recover from foot-
ball," in the words of Harvey. At the

Michigan Relays, Parks had a time of
7.48 in the preliminaries of the 60-yard
high hurdles, but ran poorly in the
finals, when he hit four hurdles. The 60-
yard dash saw Woolfolk clocked at 6.42
in the same meet. Woolfolk continued to
train rather than enter the WMU meet,
while Parks finished fourth in the high
hurdles.
MIDDLE AND DISTANCE RUN-
NERS: Off to a blistering start for
Michigan this season is Mike Shea, who
has qualified for the NCAA champion-
ships in the half-mile. "Shea's having a
great year," Harvey said. "He's
probably running better than anyone
this year." Shea narrowly missed
defeating Miami of Ohio's Dick
Sargeant, whom Harvey describes as
"probably the nation's top returning
half-miler," in the 600-yard run at the
Michigan Relays.
Another highly-touted Wolverine is
co-captain Ken Gardner. "He's our
most consistent mile relay leg. He's one
of the guys we're counting on to score in
the 600," said Harvey. Gardner has run
the 600 in 1:12 this season.
Michigan's other co-captain is Dave
Lewis. Lewis has run the three-mile
and 3,000 meters in the times of 13:44
and 8:20.4, respectively. Another long
distance runner, Bill Weidenbach, has
also run the three-mile race in 13:44 this
year.
Running neck-and-neck for the
Wolverines in the distance events are
Brian Diemer and Bill O'Reilly. During
the Michigan Relays, Diemer edged
O'Reilly, 4:08.99 to 4:11.23, prompting
Harvey to say that "Bill is about in the

same kind of position as Diemer."
Harvey holds high aspirations for'
Diemer based upon past performances.
"Diemer had an outstanding freshman
season last year. He's shown that he
can be an outstanding runner. I think
you're going to see some super times
from him," Harvey said.
Injuries have struck the distance
team, resulting in the absence of Dan

Heikkenen and Dan Beck from meets.
Nonetheless, the Heikkenen family has
not gone unrepresented, as younger
brother Doug picked up the slack with a*
fifth-place finish in the 3000-meter run
at the Western Michigan Relays with a
time of 8:35.2. Also placing-high iri this
meet was Steve Brandt, whose time of
14:23.69 gave him a third place in the
5000-meter run.

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MICHIGAN LONG-JUMPER James Ross leaps through the air during a
recent Wolverine practice. Ross has jumped as far as 25'82" this season in
what Michigan track coach Jack Harvey called "probably one of the better
performances in the country at this time."
Ali turns promoter,
vows to save card
NEW YORK (UPI) - Muhammed Ali, slipping questions more effectively than
he avoided Larry Holmes' punches last October, said yesterday he has become a
boxing promoter and will try to save the endangered Feb. 23 $8-million card at
Madison Square Garden.
Monopolizing a news conference also attended by the co-promoters and Garden
officials, the former heavyweight champion said his new role will be "to become
the No. 1 promoter in boxing history." He said several times that he has retired as
fighter but accompanied such statements with a variety of grins, winks and other
facial expressions.
The hard fact that emerged from statements made by Ali and Ed Franklin, at-
torney for Muhammad Ali Professional Sports, Inc., MAPS, co-promoters of the
card, was that negotiations are continuaing to save the Feb. 23 card and probably
must be concluded by Feb. 11. The latter was specifically mentioned by Franklin
as the cutoff date.
The four bouts scheduled were a 10-round heavyweight match between Gerry
Cooney, the No. 1 contender in both the World Boxing Council and the World
Boxing Association, and former WBC champion Ken Norton; a light heavyweight
title fight between WBC champion Matthew Saad Muhammad and WBA champion
Eddie Mustafa Muhammad; a WBC super bantamweight title fight between
champion Wilfredo Gomez and Mike Ayala; and a WBA welterweight title fight
between champion Thomas Hearns and former WBC champion Wilfred Benitez.
The card is jeopardized by a $21 million fraud suit by a California bank against
MAPS. A federal investigation has threatened to cancel the event. Ali's only in-
volvement with the group has been to lend his name for a fee.
Ali blasted Harold Smith, the missing chief executive of MAPS who is the object
of an FBI manhunt, and urged the fighters to settle for less money.
"Harold Smith was stealing money," said Ali during a long, rambling answer to
a question about his involvement with the promotion. "We can't pay those prices.
No promoter can. The fighters and the managers have to agree to other terms.
"The card as originally presented was unreasonable from the start. Now when
we read the papers, we know where he got those unrealistic figures from. But
people shouldn't condemn boxing. Because Nixon was no good doesn't mean the
government was bad. Boxing just had a bad man in a key spot.
"I made Don King," boasted Ali. "I made Bob Arum. I am the greatest name in
boxing and I will be the biggest promoter."

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