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January 30, 1981 - Image 11

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-01-30

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, January 30, 1981--Page 11
-imn Farley leads tankers

MMMT i r

WINTER
1981

SELF SiGN
GATE Feb 11,18, Mar4 .,EnFebnC7.9N
TIME 7-9pni TIME 60D- pm
PLACE Kuenzel Rm.~Union PLACE ContF.m.4,Union
COST 8.50 COST Free

.. N-P "02L- ea 1,m7.s Zi. ~i Z % -1 i . 4

By STEVE SCHAUMBERGER
'He worked very hard and was real easy to get
along with. He was a real nice man as well as
superb swimmer. I'm very proud of him.'
- Indiana swim coach Doc
Councilman on Michigan coach
Bill Farley
After working with countless num-
bers of swimmers during his 34-year
coaching career, one could forgive Doc
Counsilman for forgetting a face or two.
But Counsilman's memories of Bill
arley are anything but faded,
especially when recalling the days
when Farley was one of the workhorses
of the 1964 Counsilman-coached Olym-
pic team.
Farley was a medalist at the games
in the 1500-meter free-style, and he now
stands as coach of the Wolverine
tankers, who are challenging Coun-
silman and his Indiana team for Big
Ten swimming supremacy.
And even though both coaches are
good friends outside of the swimming
environment, their minds will be
focused entirely on winning when
Michigan and Indiana hook up in a dual
meet tonight at 7:30 in Matt Mann Pool.
Michigan enters the meet as the un-
derdog for a number of reasons. The
first centers around a depletion in per-
onnel that has cut severely into the
olverines' depth. Academic
ineligibility forced diver Kevin
Machemer, and freestylers Fernando
Canales and John Spaid out of com-
petition; Farley also believes his team
"has got a lot of improving to do. We're
nowhere near our performance level."
Spaid just happened to be the
Michigan swimmer whose victory in
the 500-yard freestyle enabled the
Wolverines to pull out a 58-55 upset of

the Hoosiers two years ago in Ann Ar-
bor.
The tankers rebounded off a 67-46 loss
to Wisconsin here two weeks ago by
sweeping Purdue and Illinois last
weekend in a pair of road meets, thus
improving their Big .Ten record to 2-1
and overall mark to 5-1.
"We're good," said Farley of his
team. "We can surprise a lot of people

against 014
on real strong, and we'll be stronger
than last year. We have nearly the
whole team back from last year, as well
as a few outstanding freshmen," said
Counsilman.
In one respect, however, Counsilman
is not as boastful of this team as he has
been of previous ones. While he
acknowledges that the 1980-81 Hoosiers
are "pretty good," he does not regard it
as being of the caliber of his NCAA
championship squads which dominated
the collegiate ranks in the early 1970s.
He cited the population shift toward Sun
Belt states, as well as a lack of
"adequate facilities," as the reason for
the general depletion of talent that has
taken place in Big Ten swimming.
But Counsilman has lost none of his
exuberance. A man who revels in the
challenge of swimming in open water,
he recently swam from San Francisco
to the nearby island of Alcatraz, a route
that has proven too difficult for many
good swimmers. He admits, however,
that his greatest personal achievement
occurred nearly two years ago, when he
swam across the English Channel.
The Indiana mentor has been a
pioneer in developing conditioning
techniques for competitive swimmers.
He was one of the first people to work
with heavy weights to develop strength,
helped introduce the technique of
biokinetics, and developed a "drag
suit" which now sells internationally.
He also has written three books, in-
cluding Science of Swimming, which
has been produced in 27 different
languages.
For Counsilman, swimming is both a
job and a hobby. He spends more than
50 hours a week coaching his squad, and
tacks on an additional 10-20 hours in ad-
ministratiie work, such as teaching,
writing letters, and making phone calls.
He also manages to get himself in the
pool for 90 minutes six days a week,

d mentor
while remaining active in masters
competition.
Counsilman, whose Indiana team
won ┬žix NCAA and 20 straight Big Ten
titles, has been lauded with numerous
honors during his career. One of the
initial inductees into the Swimming
Hall of Fame, he has earned the respect
of his peers and former students.
In Farley's words, "Doc Counsilman
is definitely one of the best coaches
ever."

rrniWINE
TASTING.
lW~DATE Mar 29,12
l~~TIME 7- 8pm
IPLACE Cont Pm SUnion
COST 1200

BALLROOM
DANCING
DATE Mar 4 11,25Apr1, 8
TIME 7-9pm Arl,
PLACE Ballroom
COST couple$22, Sngl4e2

BARM
CPR TENDING
DATE Mar219,26 iATE Feb9,6 Mar2,9,1623
TIME 7-10pm l i TIME 7-9.9-11
PLACE Conf.Rm. 4, Union PLACE U Ckk Bar
COST Free COST 12.00
Register Jan.21- Feb. 6 at TICKET CENTRAL, 1st floor Union

... swimming pioneer

in the Big Ten championships; we're a
darkhorse. Right now, we're aiming for
the Big Tens."
To the surprise of many critics, the
Hoosiers have been quite successful
over the first half of the season.
Following victories over powerhouse
Arkansas and Southern Methodist and
Big Ten rival Iowa, Counsilman said he
is "optimistic" about the Michigan
meet.
"Our kids have improved a lot. We
have some real sleepers who have come

Te respect which Lhe miciLgan team
holds for Counsilman has served as in-
centive for the Wolverines during
preparations for tonight's encounter,
said Farley. And he hopes it will spark
the Wolverines to recreate the ex-
citement that filled Matt Mann Pool MUSICIANS
only two years earlier. PERFORMERS
Registration 12:30-3:30 Auditions begin at 1:00
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Fiji 40, Sigma Alpha Epsilon 39 Bowling Green, OH Tues.,Fe
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Women's (competitive) TECHNICIANS
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--

LOOK TO AVENGE EARLIER LOSS:

M matmen eager to duel MSU

By JOHN KERR
Thd members of Michigan's
wrestling team haven't forgotten what
iappened to them in East Lansing last
November 26. They lost a dual meet to
the Michigan State Spartans.
To make matters worse, the
Wolverines blew a 16-9 lead with only
three matches to go when the Spartans'
three heaviest wrestlers, all. defeated
their Michigan opponents, thus
enabling State to eek out an 18-16 vic-
tory.
THAT'S WHY tonight is so impor-
tant. For tonight at 7:30 the Spartans
will be at Crisler Arena for a rematch,
*and there's nothing that the Wolverine
grapplers would like better than to even
White Sox,
arin ers
esold
SEATTLE (AP) - Southern Califor-
nia .developer George Argyros is nor-
mally reserved, but he bubbled yester-
day after the American League owners
approved his purchase of the Seattle
Mariners.
"I'm elated," said Argyros.
"I feel absolutely great. I dreamed
about this a long time and now I'm very
excited."
Under terms of the deal reported at
*he league meeting, Argyros f pur-
chasing 80 percent of the 4-year-old
franchise for $10.4 million.
At yesterday's meeting, sale of the
Chicago White Sox to a group headed by
Jerry Reinsdorf, a Highland Park, Ill.,
real estate developer, and Eddie
Einhorn, a television executive, for $20
million was also approved. Approval of
both sales came within about an hour
nd had been expected.
Reinsdorf, a suburban Highland Park
real estate dealer and Einhorn, a
television executive, will be equal par-
tners in the new operation purchased
from a group headed by Bill Veeck.

the score with their archrivals.
"This is as important a match as
we'll wrestle all season," said Michigan
coach Dale Bahr. "It's definitely a big
rivalry for us. We'd like to establish
that we're a better team than they
are," he continued.
"A victory would also help recruiting
and prestige in the state of Michigan,"
said Bahr.
ACCORDING TO the Michigan
coach, a lack of preparation accounted
for the earlier loss. But this time, said
Bahr, his team will be fully prepared to
do battle with the Spartans.
"We just weren't psychologically
ready last time," said Bahr. "We had
just come off a weekend tournament
where we wrestled about 100 matches.
But this time we're about as healthy as
we can be. The team is feeling real
good, and they're working hard.
Similar to their first encounter, the
final three matches of the evening could
likely determine the match's outcome.
This time, though, the Wolverines

would like to win them.
ROB RECHSTEINER at 177 pounds will
have the toughest match of the night,
according to Bahr. Rechsteiner will be
tangling with Rob Foley, who is con-
sidered the Spartans' best wrestler.
Foley scored a 6-1 decision over
Rechsteiner last time and his victory
was the spark that ignited the Spartan
rally.
Another key match will take place in
the heavyweight division, where
Michigan's Eric Klasson will meet the
Spartans' Dan Holt. Holt, at 6-9 and 330
pounds, seems too big for even
heavyweight competition, and in the
first meeting he upended defending Big
Ten champion Klasson by a 7-2 score.
Bahr, however, feels Holt won't post
a repeat performance this time.
"Eric was not used to wrestling big
kids like that," said Bahr. "But he's
watched Holt wrestle since then and
he'll be ready this time."
All Klasson has to do is remember
November 26.

N

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I

Come Rethink Your Identity

The community is warmly invited
to attend a free lecture at
First Church of Christ, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw in Ann Arbor

Saturday, Jan. 31-2:00 p.m.
Spiritual Man Discovered

The lecturer is JOHN M. TYLER, CSB, a member
of Lectureship of the First Church of Christ,
Boston, Massachusetts.

of the Board
Scientist in

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clear

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with

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Child care and parking available.

COLLOQUIUM
TRANSNATIONAL LEGAL PROBLEMS OF
REFUGEES
Jan. 30 and 31, 1981
University of Michigan Law School
Room 100, Hutchins Hall
FREE TO U.M. FACULTY AND STUDENTS
FRIDAY, JANUARY 30
1ni nn n 11)nnol I D 4Rcaiias nIntr err irnr Lnw

10-30% off on al
priced Bass & Ti
hoes & boots.
SALE ENDS MONDAY, FEB. 2
529 East Liberty
MON-FRI. 9:30-8:00; SAT. 9:30-6:00-665-979

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