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January 30, 1981 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-01-30

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Page 6-Friday, January 30, 1981-The Michigan Daily
Sun Belt, Frost Belt
advocates woo Congress

WASHINGTON (UPI) - Congress
was told in conflicting testimony
yesterday that the "Sun Belt versus
Frost Belt" battle over the shifting of
industry from the East to the South and
Southwest represents either a threat to
democracy or a fraud.
Felix Rohatyn, chairman of New
York's Municipal Assistance Cor-
poration, said democratic institutions
will be threatened if the shift of in-
.dustry and population divides the
nation into "haves" and "have-nots."
MAYOR DAVID RUSK of
Albuquerque, N.M., disagreed, conten-
ding that cities in the Sun Belt are
playing "catch up," with family in-
comes still far below those in the in-
dusterial cities of the Northeast and
Midwest.
"TdhSun Belt-Frost Belt conflict is
substantially a fraud perpetrated by
the news media and learned academics
for whom the catch-phrase is an easy

....

route to publication," Rusk said.
Rohatyn told Congress' Joint
Economic Committee that decontrol of
oil and gas prices - including "the
cowardly avoidance" of much higher
taxes on gasoline - was partly to
blame for shifts in national wealth that
"threaten our social and economic
stability as a nation."
Rohatyn called for revival of the
Depression-era Reconstruction Finan-
ce Corporation to help provide financial

aid for hard-pressed industries like
Chrysler and cities such as New York.
He said his corporation has played that
sort of role in bringing New York. City
back from the brink of bankruptcy.
Rusk, challenging Rohatyn's call for
federal policies designed to slow the
shift, said leadership in economic
growth have moved from region to
region throughout the nation's history.
Such shifts, he said, have been "one of
the nation's strengths."

Student blood drive
helps 'U'Hospital

(Continued from Page 1)
to sponsor the drive, Noskin said. The
Fraternity Coordinating Council and
the Panhellenic Society have also been
"A big help" in organizing the project
and providing workers, he said.
Noskin's 50-member fraternity spon-
sors three blood drives a year. The next
one is scheduled for March.

Although the Alpha Phi Omega
president said the fraternity's volun-
tee~s put a lot of time and effort into a
thankless job, he said the benefits are
worth the troubles.
"It's worth it in the end when we
know we have helped motivate people
to help other people," Noskin con-
cluded.

AP Photo
TWO STRIKING POLISH farmers sleep on the floor of an official trade union's former headquarters Wednesday. The
farmers, along with 300 peasants and workers, have occupied the building since Jan. 3, seeking action on their demand'
for independent farmers' unions.
Polishgovernment sends

'U' profs suggest reasons
for overcrowded classes
(Continued from Page 1)

to early morning and late afternoon
classes, Stewart said, it would ease the
crowded situation, because classrooms
are empty during those hours.
Approximately one Univesity
classroom per year is converted into an
office or laboratory, contributing to the
overcrowded classroom problem,
Stewart said. At least three classrooms
will be turned into offices next fall, he
added.
LARGE COURSES have also made
some people -fear a reduction in the
quality of teaching. Acting LSA Dean
John Knott said that it was "not
possible to know the effect" over-
crowding will have on teaching quality.
But University Vice President for
Academic Affairs Bill Frye said he
thought there might be "a deterioration

(of quality)'in some instances," but
that it depended upon whether
"dialogue between student and teacher
was instrumental to learning in the
class."
Psychology TA David Reuman said
with more students, "It's difficult to
have a real discussion." He added, "To
a certain extent it affects what I can
do."
POLITICAL SCIENCE TA Ronald
Brown said he didn't think quality was
suffering, but noted that in a larger
class "you have to work harder to draw
out students who don't talk. With a
large class people can hide."
Student reactions to crowded courses
vary between feelings of helplessness
and sympathy with the problems faced
by department officials.
Computer Science sophomore Scott
Wiener said he feels frustrated because
he failed to get into two computer
classes he wanted.
"It's definitely not their (the depar-
tment's) fault" he said. "They need
three more profs to teach the course.
The department isn't getting any
bigger and it's driving them bananas."
LSA senior Steve Davis said he felt
the problems stemmed from the fact
that many students sign up for the same
courses. He said he had no trouble get-
ting into his classes, and added, "But
who wants to take Latin?"

warning.to
WARSAW, Poland (AP) - The Polish government warned
yesterday that it would take "necessary" but unspecified ac-
tion to quell the "anarchy and chaos" created by a wave of
labor unrest gripping the nation. The Soviet Union kept up its
harsh criticism of events in the Communist nation.*
The official government warning came just hours after
agreement was reached for a meeting today between in-
dependent trade union negotiators and Premier Jozef
Pinkowski and other government officials to discuss the
union's main grievances.
A CALL BY Solidarity for a moratorium on strikes until af-
ter today's talks, intended to head off a one-hour general
strike next Tuesday, was generally ignored as wide areas of
Poland were hit by strikes.
Warning strikes and sit-ins continued yesterday in a wide
semi-circle from Poznan to the town of Ustrzyki Dolne a few
miles ,from the Soviet frontier, heightening concern of
-possible Soviet intervention in Poland. Soviet and Eastern-
bloc troops have been massed at the Polish border since last-
fall.
Yesterday, the Soviet Union issued a second harsh com-'
mentary in as many days on events in Poland, accusing the
independent trade union Solidarity of "intensifying anarchy
in the country."
IN ITS WARNING, broadcast by Polish Radio, the gover-

abor unions
nment said: "The Council of Ministers declares that, by vir-
tue of its constitutional rights, it is obliged to ensure law and
order and discipline."
The communique said if the current "state of affairs" coe
tinued, the government "will have to take the necessary
decisions to ensure the normal functioning of plants and en-
terprises in accordance with the best social interests."
The decision to open talks today came in a joint meeting of
the Solidarity union's leadership, peasant leaders, and Trade
Union Minister Stanislaw Ciosek at Rzeszow in southeastern
Poland.
Union sources in Rzeszow said the only result of the session
was agreement on a three-point agenda for the talks to take
place at the Council of Ministers' building in Warsaw.
THE THREE POINTS to be discussed by Solidarity's
negotiating panel, including three peasant leaders, with thh
government were :
" The registration of the farmers' own union, known as
"Rural Solidarity;"
" The demand for a relaxation of censorship and union ac-
cess to the mass media, anti;
" Work-free Saturdays.
Ciosek, who attended the union commission meeting,
proposed that each problem be treated separately, but the
union leaders insisted they were three facets of the same
issue.

F DIVIDUAL THEATRES
-BARGAI MATINEES-
WED, SAT, SON $2.00 til 6:00
A FILM BY AKIRA KUROSAWA

Reagan
proposals
highlight
change in
direction'

(Continued from Page 1)
the United States must keep in mind
repeated indications from Soviet
leaders that "their goal must be world
domination."
c Declared that the stalled SALT II.
treaty with the Soviet Union would
permit a continued buildup of strategic
weapons on both sides, and an actual
increase in Soviet nuclear warheads..
"We should start negotiating on the
basis of achieving an actual reduction,,,
he said, while linking U.S. arms control
policy with Soviet actions throughout
the world.
" Disclosed that the grain embargo
against the Soviet Union, imposed by
Carter in retaliation for the Russian oc-

cupation of Afghanistan,\ is under
review by the National Security Council
and will be discussed next week by the
Cabinet. "You have only two choices,"
Reagan said. "You either lift it: or
broaden-it.
Said the election of Prime Minister
Edward Seaga in Jamaica was a'"great
reverse" from the pro-communist
trend in the Caribbean that began with
Cuban President Fidel Castro. Reagan
said Seaga, who visited the presiden
here Wednesday, represented thM
opening of a door "for bringing those
countries back that may have started in
that direction, or keeping them in the
free world."

TONIGHT, Pasolini's DECAMERON
While plague ravages the cities, Florentine refugees in the country beguile
their time with stories-dramatic, romantic, bawdy, as their bent may be. A
jolly depiction of the age when all Europe was Catholic and secular enjoy-
ments rubbed knees with piety. Pasolini plays the painter Giotto, so eager
was he to be a part of his picture.
7:00 & 9:00 at LORCH HALL
SATURDAY: THE EXORCIST at the MICHIGAN THEATER
The Devil ties you up in knots. 7:00 & 9:15
Plus:.SAINT JACK by Peter Bogdanovich at LORCH HALL.
An Army Intelligence officer tempts Jack to run an Army brothel in Singapore.
7:00 & 9:00
FILM CINEMA GUILD CLIP

Cracks in Christie 's Mirror'

" You'llget to hear
the name of Oxana
Yablonskaya again
and again even if it
is not as easy to re-
member as Van
Cliburn."
Philadelphia Inquirer

Continued from Page 7)
sprained ankle. Tony Curtis, as the
tough, boozy producer, is on screen
even less than Lansbury is, and unlike
Hudson he hasn't kept his looks,so he
isn't much help either.
Agatha Christie mysteries, of which
there are dozens of widely varying
quality, have officially replaced the
disaster film as the vehicle for cram-
ming as many shopworn stars as
possible into a single picture. The box
office bait works for people who
respond to the cheap thrills-two hours
of uninvolved suspense, and Counting
the latest bags and wrinkles the old-
U-M DEPT. OF THEATRE AND DRAMA
GUEST ARTIST SERIES
AUDITIONS
Feb 2 7-10pm
Feb.3 5-9pm,
callbacks Feb. 4
CAT SPL AY
by Istvan Orkeny
AUDITIONS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY
SIGN UP SHEETS BY ROOM 1502, FRIEZE BLDG.
AUDITIONS IN ROOM 2518, FRIEZE BLDG.
SCRIPTS AVAILABLE - PTP OFFICE, MICHIGAN LEAGUE
PERFORMANCES APRIL 15-19 IN POWER CENTER

timers have acquired since their' last
films.
THOUGH THE OLDSTERS are here
in abundance in The Mirror Crack'd,
the director has resorted to gimmicks
more stale than those in a television
episode of Scooby-Doo for the suspense;
it is dark, and we see a black-gloved
hand push open Miss Marple's garden
gate. Ominous footsteps make their
way into her house, over to the armchair
in which the lovable old lady is sound
asleep. A funereal score hovers in the
background. As Miss Marple wakes
with a start, however, we realize that
the midnight visitor is only her nephew,
Inspector Craddock, here to help solve
the murder.
Some of the devices for spookiness
are amusingly far-fetched. There is no
haunted castle in the quaint town where

the story takes place, but the script ha.
inserted its very own, in the form of a
There is no way this mystery could be
solved before the end of the story, and
we learn early on not even to try. The
red herrings are too numerous to wade
through. The camera focusses poin-
tedly on hands pouring whiskey
throughout the party scene in which the
drink is poisoned. We see Rudd steal his
wife's pills from her bedside and dump
them into the bathroom sink. We hear
Ella, the secretary, phone the producer
anonymously and accuse him of mir
der.
Nope, there's no way you could figure
this one out, so if you want to enjoy the
film it's best just to sit back and count
the wrinkles on all the faces and laugh.
And hope that, for her sake, Liz is
laughing with you.

'IT I*I L I cin:

LILLY TOMLIN as
THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING WOMAN
STARTS FEB. 13

MID NIGIITJ
ANN ARBOR THEATER
CHEAP FLICKS
AlL SEATS
$2.00

r

OxanadYablonskaya
Pianist!
SCARLATTI.... Three Sonatas
BEETHOVEN... Sonata in A major, Op. 101
CHOPIN... Sonata in B-flat minor, Op. 35
PROKOFIEV ... Sonata No. 3 in A minor
LISZT ... Transcriptions of three Schubert Songs
LISZT ... Etudes after Paganini
Caturday Feb.7at 8:3
Her Ann Arbor debut in a Choral Union concert.

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