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January 20, 1981 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-01-20

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0

Page 10-Tuesday, January 20,1981-The Michigan Daily
ew York faces drought

Milliken veto supports
Open Meetings Act

NEW YORK (AP)-Warning "there will be a calamity"
unless residents conserve water. Mayor Edward Koch
declared a drought emergency in the nation's largest city
yesterday and signed a law imposing fines of up to $1,000 on
water wasters.
Koch, who toured the city's upstate reservoir system by
helicopter during the weekend, said New York City has a 128-
day water supply.-
HE SAID THAT puts reservoirs at 31.1 percent of capacity,
down from their normal 80 percent of capacity at this time of
year. The mayor said it was "a shock to see the bottom of
these reservoirs with no water."
The drought proclamation mandates certain conservation
measures but the "single most important facet of our anti-
drought program" is individual conservation, Koch said.
"The major area of savings is in the bathroom," he said.
Koch said the goal of the first phase of the iconservatioin
program is to reduce daily consumption from 1.5 billion to
1.25 billion gallons by April 1.
THE FIRST PHASE forbids the use of city water to wash
cars and trucks, water golf courses, or operate ornamental
fountains. It also mandates installation of water meters on
all air-conditioning units over two tons, and the commercial
units can operate only if they recirculate water. Commercial

car washes also must recirculate water.
Koch said if the first phase falls short of the April 1 goal, a
second phase will prohibit spray caps on fire hydrants, lawn
watering, or using city water to fill private swimming pools.
A third phase would reduce water pressure in mains, limit
air conditioning, and curtail the flow of water to individual
buildings.
THE CITY'S WATER problems were worsened last Thur-
sday when the governors of New York, New Jersey, Pen-
nsylvania, and Delaware declared a drought emergency for
the Delaware River Water Basin, cutting New York City's
share by 80 million gallons daily.
The city gets half its water from the Delaware; the rest
comes from the Croton and Catskill reservoir systems.
New York City Environmental Protection Commissioner
Francis McArdle, meanwhile, said watet-saving efforts were
under way. He said his agency faced a backlog of 1,000 leaks
to repair. He said fixing the leaks has been complicated by as
much as two feet of frost below the pavement.
The city has begun distributing posters, some of them to
subway and bus lines.
"Keep New York wet. Save water," reads one poster.
"Turn off the water off when your mother is brushing her
teeth" urges another. And another advises "Ask your sister
to sit in half a tub of water.,,

LANSING (UPI) - Gov. -William
Milliken has vetoed bills letting public
bodies close job interview and em-
ployee evaluation sessions, calling
them a "step backward" for open
government, it was announced yester-
day.
The vetoes were a victory for reform-
minded lawmakers and journalism
organizations in what was considered a
major test of the state's commitment to
its tough 1976 Open Meetings Act.
THE MAIN bill would have amended
the law to allow interview sessions to be
closed at the request of the applicant -
a change sought by colleges which
claimed many top job candidates balk
at having their bids exposed to public
scrutiny before they are hired.
A second bill would have provided for

closing sessions involving sensitive
evaluations of public employees.
"These changes represent an un-
necessary step backward from the open
meetings legislation adopted four years
ago after careful and detailed
legislative consideration," Milliken
said.
"FEW DECISIONS made by public
bodies are as important as those in-
volving the selection of key ad-
ministrators or evaluating the perfor-
mance of those individuals," he said.
The governor said he did not believe
the process of selecting public officials
will be "unduly inhibited" by the
current law.
Aides to Milliken said the governor -
who has received a freedom of infor-
mation award from the professional

journalism society Sigma Delta Chi -
was influenced by that organization's
strong opposition to the measures.
"WE APPLAUD the governor's
decision to not sign those bills and we
hope that this is a sign that the governor
will take a leadership position in efforts
to keep government at all levels open to
the people which it serves," said a
spokesperson for the society's Lansing-
area chapter.
Sen. William Sederburg iR-East
Lansing), who co-sponsored the
measure dealing with job interviews,
called Milliken's action a surprise and a
disappointment.
Sederburg said he hopes Milliken can
be convinced to sign A modified version
of the bill.

Local left responds to'
right with teach-in

becoming interested in taking action,"
Jordan said.
Breakstone said the coalition will
work not only to defend national liberal
ideals and programs, but will also con-
centrate its efforts on local and campus
issues.
"Our understanding is that, in the
short term, the area on which we will
have the greatest impact will be the
local arena," Breakstone said, adding
that University program reduction,
tuition hikes, and the recruitment of
minority students would be high-
priority issues for the coalition.
"THE FIRST step (toward
mobilizing students) is to educate...
to make people aware," Jordan said.
"That was the idea of the teach-in."
Today's teach-in will include a series
of workshops and discussions that will
"reflect on the changing political
climate in the country and its im-
plications for a variety of issues," ac-
cording to Breakstone.
The Inauguration Day teach-in will
be accompanied by a demonstration on
the Diag and will be followed by a
"People's Inaugural Costume Ball."
The coalition also is asking students
not to attend classes today to protest
the Reagan presidency and to allow
tf iuttl
is preserved on
Wmm }D~FH~
The Michigan Daily
420 Moynard Street
AND
Graduate Library

time to participate in the teach-in.
"People have to understand that
Reagan's election is a time for reflec-
tion, not for celebration," Breakstone
said.
Daily ta%/ writr Jef/f Vo gi led a
report "f or this story.

Plasmatties
singer
arrested;o
concert
ostponed
By FRED SCHILL
The arrest of the lead singer and
manager of The Plasmatics Sunday
forced the postponement of the rock
group's scheduled appearance at
Second Chance last night.
Lead singer Wendy Williams, 31,
and manager Rod Swenson, 35, were
arrested on several state and local
charges following a night club ap-
pearance in Milwaukee late Sunday
night, Milwaukee police said,
AFTER ALLEGEDLY making
obscene gestures with a
sledgehammer handle, her hands,
and a microphone, Williams was
charged with violation of a local or-
dinance. Williams also allegedly
kicked a police officer in the hand
and was charged with resisting
arrest and battery of a police officer,
both state felonies.
Swenson, 35, also waS charged
with obstructing and resisting
arrest.
After arraignment yesterday in
Milwaukee County Circuit Court,
Williams and Swenson were
released on $2,000 cash bail. A
hearing on the case is scheduled for
March 10.

0

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