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December 12, 1981 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-12-12

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ARTS

The Michigan Daily

Saturday, December 12, 1981

Page 7

Brubeck to play at Hill

By James Clinton

A NN ARBOR JAZZ enthusiasts will
have an early Christmas this year,
when veteran jazz pianist Dave
Brubeck comes to Hill Auditorium Dec.
15 at 8 p.m. Brubeck will perform La
Fiesta De La Posada, a musical
reenactment of the Christmas story in
Latin American tradition, which he
composed employing traditional Latin'
rhythms. Following the performances
of La Fiesta, Brubeck will play a set
with his legendary quartet.
In his thirty-plus years as a jazz ar-
tist, Brubeck has consistently broken
new ground. Early on, he pioneered the
college concert circuit and made
tradition-breaking appearances with
numerous symphony orchestras. The
impressive list of artists he's
collaborated with includes Leonard
Bernstein and the New York Philhar-
monic, and among his credits are
numerous classical works for solo
piano, chamber groups, and full sym-
phony orchestras.
Brubeck's influence in the jazz world
is remarkable, when one considers both
his consistent originality and prolific
output. His ability to maintain such

high standards over a long period of
time has brought him continued
popularity and a legendary status in the
music community.
Jazz mogul George Wein says, "His
popularity is unquestioned. The quality
of his musical performance is never
compromised." Critic Goddard Lieber-
son points out that he is "original
without being merely temporarily
bizarre, and that is why he survives
fads and follies."
Born in 1920, Brubeck studies com-
position under the famous Darius
Milhaud. He began composing and per-
forming first with his Octet and later
with the early '50s Trio, which included
Cal Tjader. In 1951 the Dave Brubeck
Quartet, featuring Paul Desmond,
sprang into the national limelight-an
attention he's managed to keep ever
since.
Among Brubeck's achievements are
being only the second jazz man to make
the cover of Time magazine in 1954. His
Time Out was the first jazz album to
sell more than a million copies-an im-
pressive figure in 1960. He was also the
first jazz artist to perform at a State
function in the White House.
A pioneer in compound time
signatures, Brubeck has composed

several charts which have become jazz
standards, and his influence has spread
to other forms of music, as well.
Jazz polls have consistently voted the
Dave Brubeck Quartet "number one"
from the mid-50s until the group
disbanded in 1967. Since then, Brubeck
has toured internationally with various
groups that have featured such
musicians as Gerry Mulligan, Paul
Desmond, and his three sons: Darius,
Chris, and Danny.
Accompanying Brubeck in Tuesday's
special Christmas performance of La
Fiesta, will be the Abott Elementary
School )Childrens Choir, directed by
Joan May, the Ann Arbor Cantata
Singers Adult Choir, directed by
Bradley Bloom, and the Ann Arbor
Chamber Ensemble, directed by Rob
Conway.
Brubeck is very excited about the
program. "It is this sense of sharing in
an event which I have tried to capture
in this simple retelling of the Christmas
story," he said recently. In keeping
with this attitude, Eclipse Jazz has
brought together various aspects of the.
community to share in this special
family Christmas event.

STUDENT
ACCOUNTS:
Your attention is called to" the
following rules passed by the
Regents at their meeting on
February 28, 1936: "Students
shall pay all accounts due the
University not later than the
last day of classes of each
semester or summer session.
Student loans which are not paid
or renewed are subject to this
regulation; however, student
loans not yet due are exempt.
Any unpaid accounts at the
close of business on the last day
of classes will be reported to
the Cashier of the University
and
"(a) All academic credits will
be withheld, the grades for
the semester or summer
session just completed wil1not
be released, and no transcript
of credits will be issued.
"(b) All students owing such
accounts will not be allowed
tocregister in any subsequet
semester or summer session
until payment has been
made."

Cathy Moriarity" Dan Aykroyd, and John Belushi:
Neighbors of a different sort.
Xmas ilm flo od p
emphasis. on profit

a

Records

I

By Richard Campbell
E VERY CHRISTMAS national
movie distributors flood the
market with big films, small films, and
any other features that they can find.
The holidays are guaranteed box-office
bonanzas, is their feeling, so 'tis the
season to get as much profit as possible.
To help you decide which flicks to hit,
and which to miss, here is a rundown of
the more prominent releases.
Absence of Malice-Probably the
best bet for simple entertainment with
just a tinge of social commentary.
Sally Fields is the overzealous reporter
who writes a story about Paul Newman,
a story that is accurate, but not true.
The resulting tightly-scripted story has
only a slight connection with reality,
but that's never stopped a film from
making money.
Buddy, Buddy-Walter Matthau and
Jack Lemmon try to recapture the
spirit and humor of their earlier efforts.
Billy Wilder, one of the best comedy
directors, joins them in their attempt.
Early returns, however, indicate that
all this talent just didn't add up. The
plot has Lemmon attempting suicide,
Matthau acting as a hit-man, and both
getting into all sorts of hi-jinks.
Rollover-Kris Kristofferson and
Jane Fonda play the rich, powerful, and
beautiful people who practically run the
world's monetary supply. Can Fonda do
to big-business what she di'd to the
nuclear industry in The China Syn-
drome? Can she and Kristofferson save
the world? Will anybody care?
Neighbors-John Belushi and Dan
Aykroyd team up again after their
semi-flop The Blues Brothers, in this
adaptation of Thomas Berger's novel.
The book was almost all style, and it
absolutely condemned standard subur-
ban values. Regardless of whether the
film captures the novel's style, this is
sure to be the most bizarre movie this

Christmas.
Sharkey's Machine-This detective
story of underworld chrime stars the
biggest box-office name of the '70s,
Burt Reynolds. The 'Machine' refers to
Reynold's personal crime force that he
fashions together from his police squad.
Be careful with this one: although un-
doubtedly packed with action, it was
directed by Reynolds, which could
mean disaster.
Pennies from Heaven-More than
just a musical, this is a movie that
examines the relationship between the
extravagant song and dance films of
the '30s and the depression. Apparently
Steve Martin will dance and act his way
into your heart, along with Bernadette
Peters, Jessica Harper, and
Christopher Walken.
On Golden Pond-There's' almost
nobody who will not appreciate the ac-
ting team of Henry Fonda and
Katherine Hepburn. This is the first
time thby've worked together, a bit of
trivia which has overshadowed the fact
that the script is also very good.
Ragtime-After watching Hepburn
and Fonda, stroll over to see James
Cagney in his first movie in many
years. Cagney, one of the most natural
actors ever, stars in the film version of
E. L. Doctorow's novel of life in 1900
America. This was directed by Milos
Forman, whose latest effort to capture
this country on film resulted in Hair.
Taps-George C. Scott stars as the
commander of a military academy
that is about to be torn down. Timothy
Hutton, fresh from his Academy Award
performance in Ordinary People, is one
of the cadets who doesnt want his school
torn down. It might be the sleeper of
the year, but then again ...
Modern Problems-Chevy Chase is
an air traffic controller who suddenly
becomes telekinetic. Directed by Ken
Shapiro of Groove Tube fame, this one
is going to have to be pretty funny to be
any good.

MANN THEATRES
VILLAGE 4
375LNLAGPLE
769-1300ost h
thtir wods moon

Elvis Costello-'Almost Blue' (Colum-
bia)
STILL remember dreading those
Saturday mornings when my father
would wake us all up by blasting his
favorite country music station on the
radio. The petulant twang of honky-
tonk music is forever embedded in my
mind.
Costello's reverance toward his in-
fluences has led him to cover an array
of songs from traditional country
greats (George Jones, Hank Williams,
Charlie Rich, etc.). Costello's love for
country music is no secret; "Different
Finger" and "Radio Sweetheart" have
a strong Nashville feel.
Costello utilizes the soft, alluring trill
of his vocals to compel sympathy for his
self-pity-an essential ingredient of
country music. He moves you to join in
him in tears as he agonizes over un-
welcome divorce proceedings in
"Brown to Blue."
Perhaps the best thing that can be
said about Almost Blue is that a few
tracks, most notably "I'm Your -Toy
(Hot Burrito No. 1),"sound like Elvis
could have written them, if not for the
lyrical simplicity characteristic. of
country music.
All previous Costello- albums have
had diversity in their favor. Almost
Blue, from the piano bar sluggishness
of "Sweet Dreams" to the upbeat
"Honey Hush," suffers from the
monotonous twang of the John Mcfee's
,'(Doobie Brothers) steel guitar. It is
there in every song, accenting the
melody and irritating the ears.
Maybe it's my father's fault.
-Michael Huget

The Police-'Ghost in the Machine'
(A&M)
The Police, smuggly sitting at the top
of the pop rock heap, attempt to force
naive, prosaic political commentary
down our throat.
But if you ignore the lyrics, the album
fares much better. They fill up their
sparse reggae arrangements with
keyboards and horns, mix it with
Sting's lilting vocals and deliver a fun,
danceable LP.
-M. H.
,4 ,8 o~
to
yei nSeoQt

W OLIA A . 11I 12:45 3:00 5:10 7:30}
An IPC Films PfoductionJANEF FONDA KRIS KRISTO~FERSON rm A, AL AN J PAKULA F im fWQiL (OV[ P HtMF Co)"Y~
Musr. by MICHAEL SMALL Sceen y vL AVID SHABER Stry lby DAVID SHABFR and H(7NARL) PLAiN & UIAVID 0, Il
Prdue b BE3X GILBET T E)~c l y AL AN J PAKUI A . ..O - ETRCE
c,,..-..,;. .;....., " U i T I~U ACT O~ tN
UM S l W IgASIC UAIA

h.

Tehaikovskg~
Fri., I. e. 18,19 at 8:00
(ยง6.,un. t .19,20 at 2:00
For all who love the wonderment of
Christmas, beautiful music, shimmering
costumes and graceful dancing.
Tickets: $9, $8, $7, $5
Gift. Cert ifcales for concrts availabl

150______SAT SUN
INDIVIDUAL THRATRES $$1.50 TIL 6:00 pm
.,.e ao Lb" 761-970.0 "Except REDS"
ANN ARBOR THEATER GIFT CERTIFICATES
- ARE A GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFT IDEAl.
RED
WARREN BEATTY * DIANE KEATON
JACK NICHOLSON " MAUREEN STAPLETON
f4
SAT SUN-i.00 4.45, 8.30 $2.50 TIL 1:30 pm
MON--8:30 (PG)
LAST 6 DAYS
MERYL STREEP
Aeuena
SAT SUN-1:00, 3:25, 7:00, 9:25
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ANN ARBOR CHEAP FLECKS
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ALL SEATS 99C
AT 12:00 (R)
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