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December 09, 1981 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-12-09

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SPORTS
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The Michigan Daily

Wednesday, December 9, 1981

Page 7
~9.98UST'
LI~RCASSE

'A

LOSE IN OT TO CLEVELAND STATE, 85-79

Women hoopsters dumped

By LARRY MISHKIN
Christmas came early to Ann Arbor
last night and the Women's Basketball
team played Santa Claus. In a game
where they seemed to play not to lose
rather than to win, the Wolverines han-
ded Cleveland State an 85-79 overtime
victory in Crisler Arena.
After regulation time ended in a 71-71
tie when Diane Dietz's last second shot
bounced off the rim, the Vikings blew
Michigan away in the overtime period,
outscoring the Wolverines 14-8.
EARLY IN the extra stanza both
teams traded baskets twice but then the
Vikings scored seven unanswered poin-

ts and it was time for Michigan to call it
a night. The Wolverines managed to
pull within five points but Cleveland
State took advantage of the foul shots
that -Michigan gave them, hitting four
of five free throws in the final 45 secon-
ds.
For the first six and a half minutes of
the game though, it seemed as if the
visiting Vikings were the ones giving,
as Michigan built up an impressive 12-0
lead before Laura Englehart finally
found the basket for Cleveland State.
From that point on, the Wolverines'
play deteriorated until their once com-
fortable lead was cut to a close 37-31

halftime score.
IN THE SECOND half, the Vikings
picked up right where they had left off,
outplaying the Wolverines until they
tied the score at 49-49 midway through
the second half. The Vikings took the
lead for the first time at 8:30 but
Michigan managed to regain the lead a
few minutes later when Peg Harte hit
both ends of a one and one.
The Vikings knotted the score again
with 19 seconds left in regulation, and
when Dietz's jumper from the side
bounced away, the game went into
overtime.
"We didn't play well at all,", said
Michigan coach Gloria Soluk. "This
was our worst game we played all year.
We started with great intensity but
seemed to lose it. Today was not a good
indication of how well we can play."
AFTER A heartbreaking defeat like
Not enou
CLEVELAND STATE
Min fg/a f.t/a R A PF Pts.

this one, what does Soluk think her
team needs work on?,"Everything,"
she said. "We didn't have a good team
effort and we lost our composure,
especially in overtime. We'll have to go
back to the drawing board." -
The few bright spots for Michigan
were the performances of standouts
Peg Harte, 26 points, Dietz, 22 points,
and K.D. Harte, 12 points.
It was the Harte sisters that staked
the Wolverines to their early lead,
combining for the first twelve Michigan
points. But later in the first half and for
most of the second half, K.D. sat on the
bench while her younger sister and
Dietz tried to lead the team.
WHEN ASKED why K.D. was
removed from the game after playing
effectively, Soluk replied that it was a
coach's decision that had to be made.
K.D. had no comment on Soluk's move.
gh Harte
MICHIGAN
MinFG/A Ft/A R A PF Pts.

( " full court
CPRESS
Questions and answers
.. efans wait and worry
By LARRY FREED
After three games of the infant basketball season, there still remain many
unanswered questions about the puzzling Michigan cagers. So let's try to
sort out some of these pressing questions.
Q: Are the Wolverines as bad as many people are saying?
A: It's hard to say at this time, but after their exciting opening game per-
formance against the Razorbacks, they have shown sub-par efforts against
mediocre teams. Tn short (pardon the pun), it's too early to tell.
Q: What do the Michigan cagers need in order to become competitive in
the Big Ten?
A: First off, they need two things they do not have-experience and height.
But the cagers have exhibited signs of speed, which could be able to offset
the other disadvantages. Their main problem, however, lies in their reboun-
ding or lack of, which could prove fatal if the boxing-out skills don't improve
from their performances against Eastern and Northern Michigan.
Q: From listening to Bill Frieder it sounds as if almost nothing positive has
developed thus far into the season. Is that totally accurate?
A: Not really. The biggest surprise of the season has to be freshman guard
Leslie Rockymore. The Detroit Southwestern grad has shot an unbelievable
71 percent from the field, while averaging a team-high 16 points per outing.
Eric Turner, who's been tabbed as the quarterback of the Wolverines, has
shown signs of brilliance, while leading the team on fast breaks.
Starting Five?
Q: Who will be thestarting five when Michigan takes the court against
Wisconsin in the Wolverines' Big Ten home opener?
A: A few of the places are set: Thad Garner at forward, where he has
played emotionally charged, while also providing a steadying influence for
the underclassmen, Ike Person, who has played a consistent center thus far,
and Turner at guard. The other positions could go to either Joe James, Dean
Hopson, or Rockymore. The best bets are James and the Rock, with Hopson
or Willis Carter coming off the bench early for the much-needed height on
the boards.
Q: Is Rockymore for real?
A:'There is no question the 6-4 guard can fill it up consistently from almost
anywhere, but as Frieder points out, many teams will now be looking for
him, which will put more pressure on the soft-spoken freshman to get free.
Besides his shooting, Rockymore will have to improve on his defensive
ability to be a complete Big Ten guard.
Q: Why has a team that was ranked No. 1 in the country only four years
ago, sunle so low that they are picked by some forecasters to finish as low as
ninth in the conference?
A: An excellent question. But a major reason has to be recruiting and
player departures. If Keith Smith and John Garris had not transfered, they
would have solved a majority of the problem, but it still does not explain the
whole mysterious decline of Michigan basketball.
Another possible answer could be "the just-missed theory," in which
Wolverine supporters explain that Michigan was just nosed out of such stars
as Earvin Johnsonand Clark Kellogg. By putting all their effort in attaining
these standouts, the cagers were forced to settle for mediocre recruiting
years, which has proved fatal as of late. Whatever the explanation, the
.Wolverines have to find the solution quickly.
Crisler Arena crowds-
Q: Another interesting question is why are there such paltry crowds at
Crisler Arena?
A: If Michigan once again had a successful program instead of being in a
rebuilding process, they probably would draw bigger crowds, but there is no
excuse for crowds of less than 8000 people when the football team can draw
over 105,000 on Saturdays.
Don Canham is supposed to be a marketing genius, but quite frankly
anyone can market a winner; the trick will be if Canham can now fill the
seats at Crisler.
Q: Is there any turnaround of the Wolverine program in sight?
A: Although next year might see some more slow-going for the hoopsters,
they still should finish with an above .500 mark. The Wolverines should then
recapture the glory years of the mid 60s and 70s, starting in 1983 when Tur-
ner and Co. begin to mature as a unit. And with the addition of Tim McCor-
mick, Jon Antonides and some "key recruits" that Frieder has been touting
lately, the cagers will also return to the national limelight.
Q: That's in the future, but right now the football team suffered through a
mediocre season and the basketball team is heading for a sub-par year as
well. What is a Michigan sports fan to do?
A: Be thankful you're not a Notre Dame fan.

IA

Evans ...,........
Englehart .........
'Sobolewski ........
Chaney ..........
Kozio...........
Kess..............
Kochis ....g...
Hotz ............

39
30
13
31
43
14
21
26

8/18
4/8
2/7
3/5
5/9
2/4
6/9
6/7

4/5
1/2
0/0
0/0
2/4
1/2
1/2
4/6

10
5
5
4
4
4
3
4

3
1
0
2
5
1
1

3 20
4 9
2 4
0 6
2 12
0 5
1 13-
2 16

Dietz............45
Soullier.........41%
Harte, P........... 40
Harte,K.D......... 40
Gnatkowski........42
Doutt.............. 23
Donovan..........5
Wiley...........31
Baurngart .........I1

11/28
3/8
8/16
6/13
2/11
0/3
1/1"
0/0
0/0

0/1
3/4
10/12
0/0
3/4
0/0
0/0
1/2
0/0

11
8
6
5
2
1
0

5
2
1
2
3
3
0
0
0

1
2
1
2
5
I
I
1
0

22
9
26
12
7
0
2
1
0

Photo by JEFF SCHRIER
PEG HARTE (14) goes over two Cleveland State players for two of her
game-high 26 points as Diane Dietz (21) looks on. Michigan lost the game in,
overtime, 85-79.

,:

UNDEFEA TED IN.'81
Kiasson: ,Heavy favorite

I

1

Fry named
top coach

By DOUGLAS B. LEVY
Freshman; chosen by one of the top
wrestling organizations as the best
freshtpan heavyweight in the nation.
Sophomore, & 16-8 record, Big Ten
heavyweight champion, qualified for
the NCAA tournament.
JUNIOR; a 29-7-1 record, second in
the Big Ten tournament, again
qualified for the NCAA tournament.
Senior, undefeated thus far, and
ranked seventh in the nation among the
heavyweights. Who is this fine athlete?
Eric Klasson of the Michigan
wrestling team.
Since being a highly regarded fresh-
man, Klasson has lived up to his poten-
tial and gone far beyond. What is most
important, however, is that Klasson has
matured in every phase of life, not just
as an athlete.
As a senior, Klasson has started to
look towards his future. "I am going to
take care of my graduate school ap-
plications over Christmas vacation."
Indeed he will, as he is considering such
top schools as Dartmouth, Cornell, and
Northwestern.
SO WHAT about a possible career?
"Well, my dad is a consultant for cor-
porate planning and strategies, and
eventually I would like to work for
him."
But right now Klasson is contem-
plating a successful wrestling season
for the team first, and himself second.
"We do have a long and tough schedule,
but we are mentally and physically
prepared. The team has * a good at-
titude, and we are looking forward to
the competition." The competition will
be among the best in the nation,
especially with the commencement of
the Big Ten season.
Does Klasson have any particular
goals that he is shooting for? "I want to
be the best wrestler I can be. Over the
past three years I have gained a great
deal of experience, and I know what to
expect."
Klasson will be content to just keep
improving. "As the season progresses,
SCORES
College Basketball
Kentucky 85. Indiana 69
Indiana State 81, Ball State 80
Minnesota 80, Drake 55
Wake Forest 82. Davidson 63

I think my performance will improve,
and my ranking will move up."
LAST WEEKEND in a tournament at
Penn State, Klasson demonstrated how
he has become an overpowering
wrestler as he won the heavyweight
division. Tonight at Crisler Arena
(7:30 p.m.), Michigan is hosting an ex-
cellent Penn State team in a dual meet.
Last year Penn State finished sixth in
the nation, and they are currently
ranked ninth. Klasson and All-
American Joe McFarland are expected
to be in excellent form.
As he has entered his final season of
wrestling and his, final. year as an un-

dergraduate student, it seems natural
that Klasson would feel a bit nostalgic.
Klasson feels very strongly about
having been an athlete at the Univer-
sity. "I really 'think that we are a
classier breed of athletes."
So no matter what happens to the
Michigan wrestling team, Klasson will
continue to be the consistently intense
and successful competitor. ;

ST. LOUIS (AP)- Hayden Fry, who
guided the Iowa Hawkeyes to their first
winning season in two decades, has
been chosen college fbotball Coach of
the Year by the Sporting News.
Iowa, ranked 13th and winner over
Nebraska, Michigan and UCLA in an 8-
3 season, will meet No. 12 Washington
in the Rose Bowl on New Year's Day.
It was the third year at the Iowa helm
for Fry, 52. Previously, he coached at
Southern Methodist and North Texas
State.

VIL LAGE CORNER
Dec.9-13 S ecials
1.Sealtest (half %)Milk 1.59
2No Brand O j(half gal) 109
3Faygo iters .35dep
4.red delicus/macintosh 3 has.85t

I

sliced meats
canch-.smorgas pak
601 S. Forest-

.630

Kasson
senior leader

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TRAINING: 'raining programs offering early managerial and
technical responsibilities. Immediate opening in aviation management.
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