100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 10, 1981 - Image 92

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



':; - a.

w

I,

The Mic igan Dal y-tA6 rsday, eptem~b

Page 8-E-Thursday, September 10, 1981-The Michigan Daily

No time for novels

To students, reading means a steady diet of

By JOHN ADAM
Many people find reading a pleasant
experience, from the initial browsing
stage in some large bookstore, to that
final page.
But reading is a bit different for stud-
ents. In the first place, they have to
think in terms of books like Politics and
Vision, rather than The Lord of the
Rings. And as if that were not enough,
they have to endure bookrush term af-
ter term, throughout their college
careers. Not a pleasant thought.
IT'S THE SAME thing each year. An
enthusiastic young student goes boun-
ding out of the dorm, checkbook in
hand. "I'll be back in half an hour," he
says to his roommate. "I've only got to
pick up a few books."
Words cannot describe the astonish-
ment - or perhaps, more ap-
propriately, the horror - on that young
man's face when he first sees the
crowd, the lines, and the disarray at the
book store.
With a shy step forward, he puts one
foot in the door, and is swiftly caught up
in a stream of students and carried to
the shelves of course books.
THERE ARE THREE main course
book retailers in town: Follett's,
Ulrich's, and the student-operated 'U,
Cellar. By the end of the term, the
average student will be intimately
acquainted with at least one of these
stores:
Follett's offers a fairly wide selection
of Michigan "Go Blue" T-shirts, mugs,
and other memorabilia; a fairly sparse
supply of art supplies; an adequate
supply of non-course books; and a fairly
good supply of course books.

A comparison of book prices
Heavily demanded textbooks and

their prices, as of

June 1981

BOOK

Follet's

Anthropology/ used
Kottak
Economics/new
Lipsey, Steiner
Curso Basico /used
Wolfe
Physics/ used
Sears
Psychology/ used
Hilgard, Atkinson

13.45
18.43
12.70
17.20
13.50

Ulrich's
13.45
18.40
11.95
17.20
15.70

U Cellar
13.45
18.40
11.95
15.70
14.20

textbooks
the 'U' Cellar retreats back to its
basement abode to offer a selection
ranging from toileyries to classical
records.
In terms of volume, the 'U' Cellar is
the prime mover of coursebooks, with
Ulrich's and Follett's vying for second.
But more important is the method of
service which varies from store to
store.
Ulrich's uses clerk service; that is, a
student gives a salesperson a list of
books and waits for them to be
retrieved and delivered. This method
saves the hassle of wandering around
aisles, and it usually saves times as
well; but one loses the advantage of
browsing for the used book in the best
condition. (After looking at the prices of
the textbooks, many students, predic-
tably enough, seem to prefer the old.)
BOTH FOLLETT'S and the 'U'
Cellar rely on the self-service ap-
proach. Follett's lists the books by
course number. For example, all the
books from Philosophy 320 will be in the
same area.
The 'U' Cellar categorizes the books
by subject (such as economics, math,
etc.) and then the books are found
alphabetically by the author's last
names. This method is more difficult
than thegother two, but clerks hover
about to guide the more confused.
Finally, loaded down with textbooks,
pencils, notebooks, a brand new
stapler, pens, thumb tacks, and a Bo
Derek poster, our valiant student
trudges home.
"Where the hell have you been?" his
roommate asks. Our student can only
stare blankly and sigh. "Bookrush."

Sound and Fury/new 2.95 2.95 2.80
Faulkner (vintage)
(prices on used books usually vary depending on their condition)
T'"f."}?.}":{y:}% ' i:4"Y L}:i"Yr"T?-tii":::"}}}'}}ieMEr'"iri:: ir'

Ulrich's provides 'roughly the same,
but it's a good deal stronger in the art
supplies and non-course books depar-
tments, and a bit less extensive in the
"M-Go-Blue" paraphernelia. (This is
not to say there isn't plenty of the lat-
ter; it's unavoidable in this town).

THE 'U' CELLAR, a non-profit
student organization, moves up to the
second floor ballroom of the Michigan
Union from its home in the basement at
the start of each semester to accom-
modate the onslaught of course book-
mongers. Once the "season" is over,

Food: A great excuse to visit Detroit.
" the Music Hall which has dance,
opera, orchestral, and mime groups on
an annual basis
" Fort Wayne, built on the Detroit
Riverfront during the 1840s and now
restored to its original appearance, of-
fering a step back in time
* the Stroh's Brewery, a must for
beer lovers, and tours end with free
beer and snacks
" Belle Isle Park, an island in the
Detroit River, a great picknicking area
with a zoo, stables, soccer field, canoe
livery, and the Dossin Great Lakes
Museuma
IN ADDITION, beer loving baseball
fans might want to catch a game at
Tiger Stadium on Michigan Ave. about
five blocks from the old, large Penn
Station Amtrak terminal.
* * *
For an "international experience,"
Windsor, Canada lies directly across
the river from Detroit and is easily
reached by the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel
or the Ambassador Bridge. The Detroit-
Windsor port authority also operates

daily and weekend bus service from
downtown.
Overpowering the skyline of Detroit
as viewed from Windsor is the
Renaissance Center-the symbol of the
city's rebirth. This architectural
masterpiece contains stores, a hotel, a
post office, office space, and 13
restaurants-including a revolving
restaurant on the 70th floor that offers a
breath-taking view of the city, and even
of Windsor.
On the way back to Ann Arbor, the
traveler can stop in Dearborn to see the
world-famous Henry Ford Museum and
Greenfield Village, to relive yester-
day's important moments through a
vast variety of historical exhibits.
TO THOSE UNFAMILIAR with the
city, Detroit is divided into east and
west sides by Woodward Avenue
(Route 1) which leads right into the
heart of the downtown riverfront area.
Once inside the city, the public tran-
sportation is very good with most bus
lines operating 24 hours a day at a cost
of 60t a ride. The city also recently

Dait

renovates an open double deck trolley,
the only one of its kind operating in the
world.
Detroit is readily accessible to Ann
Arbor by either train, bus, or car. Am-
trak has daily service to and from the

city at about $1
tion for those w
hours). Greyh
clock service,
miles east of At
by car.

THE MICHIGAN LEAGUE
IN THE HEART OF THE CAMPUS
(across from Hill Auditorium, Burton Tower & MLB)
When you're newly arrived in A.A.,
Graduation's a long way away--
But that jubilant June
Will be here much too soon
Once you're used to the League every day.
M.B.
Send your League limerick to:
Manager, Michigan League
227 S. Ingalls;
You will receive 2 free dinner tickets if your
limerick is published.
The Little League Snack Bar
Lower level-open
Mon-Fri 7:15-4:00
Sat 7:15-11:00am
Cafeteria-open
Mon-Sat 11:30am-1:15pm
5:00pm-7:15pm
Sun 11:30am-2:l5pm

A .
a /r" t a
T- L
THE MICHIGAN LEAGUE

.,

Staff extends a warm welcome
to new students
Your place to:
Meet friends for breakfast, lunch or a
snack in The Little League
Relax in our garden
Treat yourself to our delicious student
special dinner in the cafeteria
Study in the Library and 3rd floor
Pick up the latest paperbacks, magazines,
souvenirs and supplies at the newstand

" LESSONS " RENTALS * SALES " EXPERT REPAIR
O Herb David Guitar Studio 0
302 E. Liberty
o 665-8001 z
N Ann Arbor.
lessons
" Repairs
z -9 Customv
N J: _ Instruments
We Sell the
z _Tools We Use:
INCA Poewer Tools
Quai fy Hand Te/s
l1om-6 pm
=-Except Sundays C
Herb David Students Always Get an Encore
TAKE LESSONS AT HERB DAVID'S
*'WE MAKE: * IRISH AkkbS * GIltA't * BAN.IOS' .' FIDDLES

U

4 .,v u. _

® i i i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan