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December 04, 1981 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i

The Michigan Daily-Friday, December 4, 1981-Pace
Bonus no gift,

expert c
LOS ANGELES (UPI)-The Christ-
mas bonus, an employer's annual stab
at generosity and good cheer, may ac-
tually be just a clever device to
manipulate workers and deny them
well-deserved raises, a University of
Southern California researcher said
Wednesday.
"Employers give the impression of
acting out of altruism, but they usually
expect something in return," said
Jerald Jellison, an associate professor
of psychology at USC and consultant
who teaches "Power Management" to
private businesses.
"AN EMPLOYER can use the
Christmas bonus as a tool to
manipulate you all rear round. I call it
dangling the carrot with the bitter af-
tertaste," Jellison said in an interview.
any number of excuses," Jellison said.
"If you pay close attention to what is
happening throughout the year, the
employer is putting all sorts of pressure
on you to get this thing. In June they tell

aims
you to jump over one hurdle if yotuw
the bonus, then later in the year
have to jump over two more hurdles:
"By the time December rolls aro
you've jumped so many hurdles you
working 60 hours a week instead of
he said.
THE BONUS is presented as
reward for a job well done throughdIt
the year, but then the employee
frequently uses it to obligate the worker
to work longer hours after the
Year.
"I've heard of interesting ca
where people say they are going to qiW
after the first of the year and tkO
didn't get any bonus," Jellison said.
it was really a reward for the job done
in the past year, you should still get it f
"When handed the bonus, you mijsit
say: 'I'm really pleased to get t}
bonus. I assume it means I'm doing-i
good job, and since I'm doing such-
good job, can I also expect a salary'4
justment?' " w.

"CAMP DAVID REVISITED:
CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE NEXT PHASE
IN THE MIDDLE EAST"
Lecture by: DR. HAIM SHAKED,
Professor of History, Tel Aviv University
Visiting Professor, York University, Canada
Monday, December 7, at 4 PM
East Conference Room, Rackham Bldg.
Sponsored by Center for Near Eastern and North African Studies, Department
of History, and Program in Judaic Studies.

AP Photo

Snowy night in Moscow
Troops go through changing of the guard ceremony in Moscow's Red Square last Monday night after the first heavy snowfall of the season.

* -
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*Day care center
horror story unfolds

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stamng
Miler High Life'

wMARTINEZ, Calif. (UPI) - A 6-
kar-od boy who survived almost four
years in an unlicensed day care center
portrayed by prosecutors as a chamber
of horrors told investigators of the
treatment that allegedly claimed the
life of one of his playmates.
The boy, described only as "Jimmy,"
told a sheriff's department in-
vesti gator about his experiences at the
hands of Eleanor Laurie Nathan, 35,
charged with the March 18 murder of
11-month-old Matthew Cromwell and 20
counts of child abuse.
"WHAT WOULD happen if you wan-
ted to sleep at Mrs. Nathan's?" Jimmy
was asked by sheriff's Sgt. Al Snell.
"She would kick me in the face," the
child told him.
The boy was not seriously injured in
over three years at the center.
However, six other children were
hospitalized as a result of their injuries.
A PORTION of affidavits filed by the
sheriff's office in connection with the
Nathan investigation, Jimmy's
statements came to light at the Pit-
tsburg, Calif., woman's arraignment
Wednesday. She was in custody on
$250,000 bail.
The papers filed in Mt. Diablo
Municipal Court told a harrowing story
of the alleged mental and physical tor-
ments suffered by the 40 children who
spent their days at the facility run by
Nathan at her home in Clayton, Calif.
The documents, which included
results of police investigations and ac-
counts by parents, were a litany of

slappings, punchings, banishings to
unlit rooms and the out-of-doors during
stormy weather.
Nathan was arrested Monday after a
ftwo-month investigation by East Bay
1authorities into the activities at the day
'care center. She will not enter a plea to
the charges until Dec. 15 on the advice
of her attorney.

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A Foot-Stomping &
Joyous Revue of
Song & Dance
Dec. 3, 4, 5
8:00 P.M.
St. Mary's Student Chapel
331 Thompson Street
Dec. 3, 4...........$4.00 Students
$5.00 Non-Students
Dec. 5. . . Gala Dessert Buffet
Benefit Night
$12.50 advance
$15.00 at door
Ticket Reservations: 663-0557

"Those college
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thle9'%re so'
Sm~art.

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buft on)aU we
know if .)
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