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December 04, 1981 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-12-04

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, December 4, 1981-Page 5
Nuclear war course seen
at Harvard Med. School

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP)- Amid
growing concern over the possibility of
"the final epidemic," some students at
Harvard Medical School may soon be
taking a new course: "The Health
Aspects of Nuclear War."
The proposed elective course is part
of a growing movement within the Har-
vard medical community to protest the
escalating nuclear arms race. The
school's curriculum committee will
vote on the proposal Monday, and if it
approves, the course would begin next
semester.
"THIS IS A sign of the growing
awareness that we are facing the final
epidemic-nuclear war," said James
Muller, an assistant professor of
medicine and one of four faculty mem-
bers who proposed the course.
"One of the problems is that it's too
horrible to imagine," he said. "One can
imagine one burned child, or perhaps a

school of burned children, but who can
.imagine more than 100,000 burned
children?
The four are members of Physicians
for Social Responsibility. The 7,000
member group, based in Watertown, is
opposed to the continuing threat of
nuclear war.
DR. HERBERT Abrams, a professor
of radiology, said the 15-lecture course
would focus on what medical problems
surviving physicians would face
following a nuclear war.
They include the effects of radiation
on the body's immune system and the
expected epidemics of typhoid and
other diseases that would follow the
destruction of health and sanitation
facilities.
Professors will also discuss the long-
term effects of radiation, including in-
creased cases of leukemia and other
cancers.

AT THE END of the course, the in-
structors would discuss methods Pof
preventing a nuclear holocaust. Studen-
ts would be required to take a final
examination or write an essay.
Abrams believes this is the first such
course to be proposed for a medical
school.
"Doctors don't know that much about
the effects of nuclear war," he said.
"They know this can kill, but not many
have been exposed to information about
things like blast and burn injuries."
Doctors, he said, "look on war as a
matter of national policy. But this is the
first time they have had been faced
with such a life- and health-threatening
possibility."
Muller, a cardiologist, says the cour-
se represents only a small part of the
growing activism at Harvard and other
campuses.

Daily Photo by JACKIE BELL
Patience, patience
As 1:30 p.m. comes and goes, resigned CRISP line-sitters await their turn to climb up those stairs and face an unsym-
pathetic computer.

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*"Europeans to join
peace force in Sinai

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(Continued from Page 1)
political conditions" to their par-
ticipation.
The clarifications by Britain, France,
Italy and the Netherlands appeared to
be a retreat from their earlier position
linking the force to progress on the
Palestinian issue.
THE FOUR countries alarmed Israel
when they announcedthey would send
troops, but at the same time under-
scored Europe's Mideast policy calling
for inclusion of the Palestine Liberation
Organization, Israel's archenemy, in
the peace process.
The joint statement was aimed at
severing the link between the force and
Europe's. policy. It said the United
States "understands and appreciates"
Israel's concern at the linkage, and
"recognizes that some of Europe's
positions are at variance with its own
positions."

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A spokesman said Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir forwarded the
statement to the four countries, and it
was now up to them to explicitly accept
the declaration. "It is not enough that
they say nothing," said another official.
PRIME Minister Menachem Begin's
Cabinet, at a half-hour meeting, endor-
sed the 2 -page document after
Washington agreed to minor textual
changes.
The statement listed the tasks of the
force as written in the treaty and the
protocol, including operation of check-
points, verifying arms limitations and
ensuring free shipping through the
Tiran Strait.
Israel radio said the Europeans
would be asked to send letters of accep-
tance to Israel, and indicated they were
confident of European agreement.

a

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*U.S. Mideast policy,
ineffectual, says lobby
(Contlnued from Page) "I don't believe the Palestinian
Kessler, whose lobby receives no funds problem is the core of the Arab-Israeli
from Israel, said he hoped the Middle conflict." He said that the Arab states
East peace initiative would continue have to simply recognize, as Egypt has,
under the Camp David agreements. that peace is better than war.

JOHN SURMAN
The Amazing Adventures
Of Simon Simon

SANFONA
EGBERTO GISMONTI
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JAN GARBAREK
Eventyr

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