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December 01, 1981 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-12-01

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Page 2-Tuesday, December 1, 1981-The Michigan Daily

Supreme Court
to decide drug
smuggling case

BOWL TOURS
and

FLIGHTS

Call:

Kings Productions Auditions
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Michigan Union, Kuenzel Room Dec. I1; 2-6 p.m.
KINGS ISLAND
American Heritage Music Half Jan. 23 &24; 1&6 p.m.
Productions feature professionally designed scen-
ery, costumes, staging and choreography in fully.
equipped theatres and outdoor stages.
Singers " Dancers * Instrumentalists
Technicians " Variety Performers
$180-S250/week

WASHINGTON (AP)- The Supreme
Court agreed yesterday to decide the
fate of a federal program against drug
smuggling and heard arguments on
whether presidents can be sued for
money damages for violating the rights
of Americans.
The justices will use a Florida case to
determine whether law enforcement of-
ficers can stop, question and even sear-
ch air travelers whose behavior fits a
"drug courier profile."
FLORIDA COURTS ruled that such
tactics are impermissible because they
allow officers to stop people without the
constitutionally required "probable
cause" to suspect that a crime is being
committed.
The program, begun by the federal
Drug Enforcement Administration in
1974, is in operation at some two dozen
municipal airports around the country.
Under it, federal agents or local
police look out for passengers
displaying "characteristics" or
"behavior traits" that fit a predeter-
mined stereotype of a drug smuggler.
THE OTHER case specifically in-
volves whether former President Nixon
and his top aides can be sued for money
damages by an Air Force
"whistleblower" who claims his right
to free speech was violated by his
dismissal for speaking out about cost
overruns.
However, the justices seemed more
interested in a payment Nixon made to
limit his losses in the $3.5 million suit by
A. Ernest Fitzgerald than in the con-
stitutional issues raised by the suit.
Under that agreement, a $142,000

payment already made to Fitzgerald
will settle the suit if the Supreme Court
upholds Nixon's arguments. Nixon will,
pay an extra $28,000 if the court rules
against him.
ALTHOUGH THE financial
arrangement essentially settles the
Fitzgerald case, Nixon is pressing his
appeal in an attempt to get a ruling that
would have the effect of squelching any
other lawsuits seeking money damages
for his actions as president.
The court's decision is expected by
July. But comments from a majority of
the justices yesterday suggested they
may find the case moot because of the
Nixon-Fitzgerald agreement and send
the matter back to a lower court
without deciding the constitutional
issue.
In other matters yesterday, the'
court :
" Refused to disturb racial
desegregation plans in effect for public
schools in St. Louis and Buffalo. The St.
Louis plan last year required the busing
of some 7,600 students within the city,
and soon mayresult in city-suburb
busing. About 3,200 pupils have been
bused since last September under the
challenged phase of the Buffalo plan.
* Ruled in a case from Santa Ana,
Calif., that communities seeking to ban
pornographic movies or close down
theaters showing such films do not have
to prove "beyond a reasonable doubt"
that the movies are obscene, but can
use a less stringent standard of proof.
* Refused to give 12-year-old Karen
O'Connor of Prospect Heights, Ill., a
chance to play on the boys' basketball
team at her junior high school.

On
25C
Con
K .
Kin

ne round trip air fare will be paid to hired performers traveling over
0 miles to the park.
n[act rPrk or Kings ProdJuctors for further otilon rormtion
y,,iPronlC s E"rtnment Deps19 r liliAve c( xirone OH 45 19
~rIln reShows Or-in Kmgqsula U 1O i45034

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
24 plead innocent in
Sadat assassination trial
CAIRO, Egypt- One of 24 Moslem fundamentalists charged with the
assassination of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat told a military court
yesterday he was "guilty of killing the unbeliever and I am proud of it."
But after counsel from his attorney, army 1st Lt. Khaled Ahmed Shawki
el-Islambouly and 23 others pleaded innocent to charges of premediated
murder and illegal weapons possession in the Oct. 6 murder of Sadat and
seven others at a military parade.
Judge Samir Fadel Atteya, presiding over Egypt's Supreme Military
Court, denied requests by defense attorneys to subpoena President Hosni
Mubarak and Defense Minister Abddel Halim Abu Ghazala for questioning
about the murders.
Syrian president vows
to eliminate Moslem group
DAMASCUS, Syria- President Hafez Assad vowed yesterday to wipe out
the fundamentalist Moslem Brotherhood, which he blamed for the bombing
that killed 76 people and wounded 135 over the weekend.
A booby-trapped car exploded at midday Sunday outside a crowded
elementary school on one of the capital's busiest streets. The government
blamed the brotherhood, which has been waging a two-year war against the
rule of Soviet-backed Syrian President Hafez Assad.
"Our people in Syria are determined to uproot and kill this gang," Syrian
state radio quoted Assad as saying.
Israel to agree to
European troops in Sinai
JERUSALEM- Israel will accept a U.S.-proposed statement aimed at
enabling European countries to join the Sinai peacekeeping force, but will
demand minor changes, a senior Israeli official said yesterday.
The statement underscores the Camp David accords and was proposed to
overcome Israeli hesitation at allowing European participation.
A senior Israeli official said the Cabinet of Prime Minister Menachem
Begin wanted minor wording changes "intended to avoid any misunderstan-
dings." He said the draft was ordered returned to Washington along with the
suggested changes and, if agreed to by Washington, would almost certainly
be accepted by the Cabinet.
Israel's two biggest newspapers accused Begin of bowing to U.S. pressure
and accepting the Europeans despite their insistence that the Palestine
Liberation Organization must be brought into the Mideast peace process.
Economy "weak," no relief
until spring, officials say
WASHINGTON (AP)- A key national measure of future economic
strength dipped substantially again last month in what one independent
forecaster called "the last big blowoff" of the current recession.
But a government official said the economy would remain "pretty weak"
the rest of the year, with no real upturn until spring.
Communists request law
to prevent Polish strikes
WARSAW, Poland- A senior Communist official said yesterday the par-
ty's request for a law preventing strikes was designed to "save democratic
changes in Poland against threats of anarchy."
But the official, who asked not to be identified, said, "one should by no
means consider-the new measures .,. as a state of emergency."
The 200-member Communist Party Central Committee demanded that the
Polish Sejm, or Parliament, grant "extraordinary means" to the gover-
nment to block strikes and prevent the sagging economy from collapsing.
Poland has a $27 billion debt to the West.
Vol. XCII, No.67
Tuesday, December 1, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 49109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is o member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Pres International.
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552: 76-DALY, Sports desk. 764-0562; Circulation, 764-0558: Classified Advertising.

764.0557; Display advertising, 764.4554: Billing, 764-0550.

6
6

0

Woman must quit job

I

WE INVITE YOU TO OUR
GRAND
OPENING
DECEMBER 1-10

HOURS:
10 AM-7 PM
Monday thru Friday
10 AM-5 PM
Saturday
LET OUR GRAND
OPENING
EYPOSE C YI Tr)

a G

to get
LANSING (UPI) -
Court of Appeals yes
with its own interpre
who ruled a man's new
to quit her job and be
mother in order for hi
of his son.
The ruling came in a
custody dispute presi
cuit Judge Frank Jean
JAMES FINN an
Green divorced in 19
year marriage whicl
EXAMS G
YOU DO
If so, attend a TI
SEMINAR and f
the safe, effecti
hypnosis can hell
INCREASE: concentr
motivation, confid
scores.
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Place: MICHIGAN LE
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Dates: Either Dec.:
Time: 7:00-8:30 p.
Fee: $18.00
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For more info, c
FREE CAS'

custody of c'hild
- The Michigan three children, all of whom were awar-
sterday upheld - ded to their mother. Five years later,
tation - a judge Jeanette agreed, based on the
v wife would have children's preference, to conditionally
come a full-time award custody of a 12-year-old boy to
m to win custody his father.
Noting that the boy allegedly had a
Macomb County learning disability and that both the
ded over by Cir- father and his new wife were working,
ette. the judge "ordered that custody of then
d Roberta Finn boy be awarded to the defendant father,
Y74, ending a 10- subject to the condition that the defen-
h had' produced dant's wife quit her job so as to be
available when the child returned from
ETTING school" each day, the appeals court
said. The boy's natural mother was not
WN? employed.
EST SUCCESS When the couple asked to have the
ind out how condition dropped, the judge said,"As
ve method of soon as Mrs. Finn sees fit to make
p you-- arrangements to be a full-time mother
yation,u emory, to the boy the order will be signed."
ence and test The Finns appealed, claiming the boy
has no disability and challenging the
iety and stress. legality of the requirement.
HITE, "We are persuaded that the trial
therapist court was in effect saying that, if
AGUE LIBRARY defendant's wife was available after
ind Fletcher , school and on school vacations to take
2, 7 or 14 care of the boy, that plaintiff's and
im. defendant's home environments would
be equal and at that point the trial court
or at the door) would give preference to the child's
gall 668-8843 wishes to live with his father," the court
'SETTE said.

0

LJXI "JVJL I VU JJ I /
THE MARVELS
OF RAPID FILM
PROCESSING
PROCESSING OF
110, 126 AND
35MM FILM INT(
---- QUALITY COLOF
PRINTS IN JUST
ONE HOUR

t

Editor-in-thief .................... SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor ................,JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor .... .............. LORENZO BENET
News Editor ........................DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors ........... CHARLES THOMSON
KEVIN TOTTIS
Sports Editor.................MARK MIHANOVIC
Associate Sports Editors............ GREG DeGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
Chief Photographer .............. PAUL ENGSTROM
PHOTOGRAPHERS-Jackie Bell, Kim Hill. Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas. Brian Mosck.
ARTISTS: Robert Lence. Jonathan Stewart, Richard
Walk, Norm Christiansen.
ARTS STAFF: Richard Campbell, Jane Carl, James Clin-
ton, Mark Dighton, Michael Huget. Adam Knee, Pam
Kramer. Gail Negbaur, Carol Poneman, RJ Smith, Ben
Ticho.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam:. Beth Allen, Julie Barth,
Andrew Chapman, Lisa Crumrine, Ann Marie Fozio,
Pam Fickinger, Joyce Frieden, Mark Gindin. Julie Hin-
ds, Steve Hook. Kathlyn Hoover, Harlon Kohn. Mincy
Loyne, Mike McIntyre. Jennifer Miller, Don Oberrot-
man, Stacy Powell, Janet Roe. David Spok. Fannie
Weinstein. Barry Witt.

SPORTS STAFF: Barb Borker. Jesse Barkin, Tam Bent-
ley. Randy Berger, Mark Borowski, Joe Chapelle.
Martha Croll. Jim Dworman, Larry Freed. Chuck Hart-
wig. Matt Henehon. Chuck Joffe, John Kerr, Doug
Levy, Jim Lombard, Larry Mishkin. Dan Newman, Ron
Pollack. Jeff Quicksilver, Steve Schaumberger. Sarah
Sherber. Kenny Shore. James Thompson, Kent Walley.
Chris Wilson. Bob Wojnowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager .........RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager.................BARB FORSLUND
Operations manager.............SUSANNE KELLY
Display Manager..........MARY ANN MISIEWICZ
Classifieds Manager............. DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager..............MICHAEL YORICK
Assistant Display Manager........ _NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals Manager..........SUSAN RABUSHKA
Circulation Manager..................KIMWOODS
Sales Coordinator ............. E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Liz Altman, Hope Barron, Alan Blum,
Daniel Bowen, Lindsay Bray, Joseph Broda, Glen Can-
tor, Alexander DePillis, Susan Epps, Wendy Fox.
Sebastian Frcka, Mark Freeman, Marci Gittelmon,
Pamela Gould. Kathryn Hendrick. Anthony Interrante.
Indre Liutkus. Beth Kovinsky, Caryn Notiss, Felice
Oper. Jodi Pollock, Ann Sachar, Mi chael Sovitt,
Michael Seltzer, Koren Silverstein. Sam Slaughter.
Nancy Thompson, Jeffrey Voight.

F
)

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
7-a---4--6 1 2 3 1 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
1071712 4 6 7 8 9 10 8 10 1112 1314 6 8 9 10 It 12
13 l 1516 1718 19 11 t 13 1415 16 17 15 17 18 19 2021
20 22 23 24 25 26 18 20 21 22 23 24 22 24 25 6- 11-2 2
27 29 30 25 2 627 28 29 30 31
1982
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL

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