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November 22, 1981 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-11-22

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WE NOW
DEtIVER
s668-8411
1140 S. University and Church

Page 2-Sunday, November 22, 1981-The Michigan Daily
350,000 Dutch
protest nuclear
arms race

IN BRIEF

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Trial begins for Moslems

rsso with precious few peers ... a singer
gece and of uncompromising taste... ??
The Los Angeles Times

From AP and UPI
AMSTERDAM, Netherlands - An
estimated 350,000 people protesting the
nuclear arms race jammed the narrow
streets of Amsterdam yesterday in the
biggest demonstration in Dutch history
and the largest of this fall's anti-
nuclear demonstrations in Western
Europe.
Premier Andres van Agt told a
meeting of his Christian Democratic
party in the Dutch town of Breda that
he sympathized with the
demonstrators, but disarmament had
to be a two-way street involving East
as well as West.
THE ORGANIZERS of the Amster-
dam protest had three common
demands: no new nuclear arms in
Europe; the Dutch government must
withdraw from the 1979 NATO decision
to modernize its nuclear missile force;
and the government must press its
NATO partners to reverse the plan.
The Dutch government last week en-
dorsed President Reagan's "zero op-
tion" proposal for cancellation of the

NATO plan in return for dismantling of
Soviet SS-20s and older middle-range
missiles.
But the huge turnout in Amsterdam
suggested that Reagan's speech last
Wednesday had little immediate im-
pact on the anti-war sentiment in
Europe.
BANNERS proclaimed "'Take the
toys away from the boys," and "No Bat-
tlefields in Europe." Planes buzzed
overhead towing messages for and
against the protest, such as
"Democratic Freedom thanks to
NATO" and "Spread Hollanditis
pacifism all over Europe."
Several hundred soldiers, many from
a draftees' union, demonstrated in
uniform in defiance of a ban by Defense
Minister Hans van Mierlo.
Bernard Dijkhuizen of the Amster-
dam police said there was no violence
and no arrests were made.
Demonstrations in Bonn, Rome and
Brussels last month drew about 200,000
people each, according to police
estimates.

Program
A recital of music by
Monteverdi, Shubert, Faure,
Brahms, Strauss, and others.

>Cesare
Siepi
Basso
Sunday, November 22, at 4:00
Hill Auditorium
Tickets at $13.00, $11.00, $10.00, $9.00, $7.00, $5.00
Tickets at Burton Tower, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Weekdays 9-4:30, Sat. 9-12(313) 665-3717
Tickets also available at Hill Auditorium
1% hours before performance time.
V MSITY IUSICAL IETY
In Its 103rd Year .

Nominations Are Now Being
Accepted for the
R~Fellowships
For students who have substantially com-
pleted all course requirements and depart-
mental exams required for admission to
candidacy; Stipend plus Tuition for 2/2
terms.
STUDENTS MUST BE NOMINATED
BY THEIR DEPARTMENT
Deadline: Feb. 5, 1982
For further information contact
the Fellowship Office 764-2218

charged in Sadat slaying
CAIRO, Egypt- Shouting religious slogans and charging they were tor'
tured in jail,23 Moslem fanatics went on trial for their lives yesterday for the
assassination of Anwar Sadat.
After a 75-minute procedural session, during which the defendants
laughed, joked and shouted angrily at the prosecutor; the trial before a
special military court was adjourned until Nov. 30 to give lawyers time to
study 754 pages of evidence.
The court also ordered an investigation into charges by five of the defen-
dants that they were tortured in jail following their arrest for Sadat'sslaying
Oct. 6.
Though they were not asked to plead guilty or not guilty, several of the 23
defendants appearing in court loudly professed innocence. A 24th defendant
was in the hospital and did not appear.
Soviet airliner banned
temporarily from U.S.
WASHINGTON- U.S. intelligence experts say Soviet Aeroflot airliners
regularly carry out spying duties such as overhead photography and
monitoring radar signals, and other national airlines do the same thing.
The Civil Aeronautics Board banned Aeroflot from flying to the United
States for one week, beginning yesterday, because two flights had deviated
from their regular off-s hore routes and had flown over "the interior of New
England."
The suspected Aeroflot spying missions took place when the Trident-class
submarine USS Ohio was undergoing its early sea trials near Groton.
Beatle wants songs back
LONDON- Former Beatle Paul McCartney is trying to buy back the
rights to Beatles songs from a British broadcasting tycoon, with the help of
John Lennon's widow, Yoko Ono, a McCartney aide said yesterday.
"Paul has a desire to own his earlier songs and everyone is talking," the
aide, who asked not to be identified, said in a telephone interview with The
Associated Press.
The rights to the Lennon-McCartney compositions, which include such
Beatles standards as "Yesterday," "Yellow Submarine" and "Hey Jude,"
are owned by Northern Songs. The company was purchased in 1969 by Lord
Lew Grade and his ATV Music Corp for 10 million pounds-about $19 million
at the current exchange rate-as the Beatles were breaking up.
The Daily Express newspaper reported yesterday that Grade, whose
communications empire includes the internationally syndicated TV
program The Muppet Show, had rejected McCartney's most recent offer of
21 million pounds-about $40 million.
"I would like Paul to have the songs back, but he must come up with the
right offer," it quoted Grade as saying.
Stockman sells Atlantic
BOSTON- Managers of the Atlantic Monthly, still a bit bewildered over
the tumultuous response to a story about David Stockman, say the issue will
probably be the biggest seller in the magazine's 124-year-history.
"It's been a"dream and a nightmare combined," said Roy Green, the
magazine's circulation director.
The storm began when word leaked out that the magazine would carry a
24-page article entitled "The Education of David Stockman." In it, the
budget director criticized some parts of the Reagan economic program. He
said the Kemp-Roth bill was a "Trojan horse" to bring down taxes for the
wealthy and called supply-side economics a new name for Republican
"trickle-down" policies.
AJhe Alantic-. gwhich .prints. analytical features and fiction and rarely
makes big news, found itself with a hot seller.
Its initial newsstand press run of 70,000 copies sold out irmediately. So did
a second printing of 70,000 copies. Another 45,000 copies will be distributed
Tuesday.
The total newsstand run of 185,000 is triple the usual number. And if sales
continue the way they are going, the December issue will be the Atlantic's
all-time best seller.
Uabttgan atI
Vol. XCII, No. 64
Sunday, November 22, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 49109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Dily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552: 76-DAILY.Sports desk. 764-0562; Circulation. 764-0558; Classified Advertising.
764-0557; Display advertising, 764-0554: Billing 764-0550.

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EVERYTHING
YOU
HEAR
{ Is
TRUE.
I am truly amazed with the
total clarity and lifelikeness
that is coming from these
records. I would almost swear
that Boz Scaggs and Michael
Jackson were standing next to
me doing their songs in
person."
This record is one of the best
recordings I have ever heard. I
found the tonal balance and,
musicality to compare equally
with any of my recordings from
Sheffield Lab or Mobil Fidelity
The pressing was.far superior
to my Nautilus recortis and
equal to my'Tlarc and
Sheffields."
-Thank you for greatly /
satisfying this audiophile'S
dream."
I'm absolutely thrilled with
the brilliance of the sound and
equally with the absence of
hisses, pops, scratches. Bravo,
and keep 'em coming."
"Compared to 'conventional'
recordings, your Mastersound
recordings are far superior in
frequency response, dynamic
range and signal-to-noise ratio.
I feel they are worth the higher
price."
I was truly astonished at the
sonic purity"
Your records are the best buy
in audio today"
Now, review them for yourself.
CBS Mastersound' is the
world's largest and finest line of
Extended Range Half-Speed
Mastered and Digital
recordings. For a free full-color
catalog write to: CBS, 51 West
52nd Street, New York, NY
10019.Rm. #826

a-

Editor-in-thief...................SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor...............JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor ................. LORENZO GENET
News Editor ........................DAVID MEYER
Opinion PageEditors...........CHARLES THOMSON
KEVIN TOTTIS
Sports Editor ..................MARK MIHANOVIC
Associate Sports Editors ............GREG DeGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
Chief Photographer .............. PAUL ENGSTROM
PHOTOGRAPHERS-Jackie Bell, Kim Hill. Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas, Brian Mosck.
ARTISTS:Robert Lence, Jonathan Stewart, Richard
Walk. Norm Christiansen.
ARTS STAFF: Richard Campbell, Jane Carl, James Clin-
ton, Mark Dighton. Michael Huget, Adam Knee, Pam
Kramer, Gail Negbour. Carol Poneman, RJ Smith. Ben
Ticho.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, Beth Allen. Julie Barth,.
Andrew Chapman. Lisa Crumrine. Ann Marie Fazia.
Pom Fickinger, Joyce Frieden. Mark Gindin. Julie Hin-
ds, Steve Hook. Kathlyn Hoover, Harlon Kahn, Mincy
Layne. Mike McIntyre, Jennifer Miller, Don Oberrot-
man. Stacy Powell. Janet Rae, David Spok, Fannie
Weinstein, Barry Witt.

SPORTS STAFF: Barb-Barker, Jesse Borkin. Tam Bent-
ley, Randy Berger, Mark Borowski. Joe Chapelle,
Martha Crall. Jim Dworman. Larry Freed. Chuck Hart-
wig, Matt Henehan. Chuck Jaffe. John Kerr. Doug
Levy. Jim Lombard,~Lorry Mishkin, Dan Newman, Ron
Pollack. Jeff Quicksilver, Steve Schoumberger, Sarah
Sherber, Kenny Shore. James Thompson. Kent Walley.
Chris Wilson, Bob Wojnowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager........... RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager.................BARB FORSLUND
Operations manager ..............SUSANNE TELLY
Display Manager...........MARYANN MISIEWICZ
Classifieds Manager............ DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager..............MICHAEL YORICK
Assistant Display Manager ... NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals Manager............ SUSAN RABUSHKA
Circulation Manager................KIM WOODS
Sales Coordinator:...........E ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Liz Altman. Hope Barron. Alan Blum,
Daniel Bowen, Lindsay Bray. Joseph Brodo. Glen Can-
tor, Alexander DePillis, Susan Epps, Wendy Fox.
Sebastian Frcka, Mark Freeman, Marci Gittelman.
Pamela Gould. Kathryn Hendrick, Anthony Interronte,
Indre Liutkus, Beth Kovinsky. Caryn Notiss, Felice
Oper, Jodi Pollock. Ann Sachor. Michael Sovitt,
Michael Seltzer, Karen Silverstein, Sam Slaughter
Nancy Thompson, Jeffrey Voight.

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F S SM T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T' F- S
1-2 3 1 3 4 567 1 2 3 4 5
10 11 12 4 6 7 8 9 10 8 10 11 12 13 14 6 8 9 10t11 12
13?f' 1516 171819 713'14'15'16'17 15 1718 192021
20 22 23 24 25 26 18 20 21 22 23 24 22 24 25 26-2;-924
1982
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
T- 9 . - - . c 4 9 7 w r a.s e

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