100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 10, 1981 - Image 78

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

al

Page 8-D-Thursday, September 10, 1981-The Michigan Daily

Women
swimmers

ek to

~capture
ig Ten
tie

By CHUCK HARTWIG
The old adage that "all, good things
must come to an end" proved true for
the women's swim team last season, as
the swimmers failed to capture the Big
Ten title for the first time in five years.
The tankers, 4-1 in the Big Ten
regular season, lost to Indiana in both
their dual meet and the conference.
championships in February. Coach Stu
Isaac felt that his team performed well
in the league meet, but described In-
diana as "awesome."
BUT EVEN though the Wolverines'
conference domination came to an end
at the Big Ten meet, several
Wolverines claimed individual cham-
pionships. Melinda Copp in the 200-yard
individual medley, Sue Cahill in the 400-
yard individual medley, and Denise
Stunzner in the 100- and 200-yard butter-
flies, were the individual victors for
Michigan. The quartet of Copp, Kathy
Kooser, Chris Hodson, and Carolyn
Clymer outdistanced the field in the 400-
yard medley relay to claim that race,
as well: .,
Following the Big Ten disappoin-
tment, the swimmers set their sights on
the AIAW meet, where they hoped to
finish among the top 15 teams in the
nation. The women failed to attain that
goal, but several atheltes came through
with outstanding individual perfor-
mances in the meet.
Diver Julie Bachman placed eighth in
the one-meter competition, with team-
mate Vicki Kimball (daughter of diving
coach Dick) finishing right behind in
ninth. Stunzner took a 13th-place finish
in the 200-yard butterfly, while Copp
finished in the same spot in the 200-yard
backstroke. In the 400-yard I.M., Copp
and, Cahill finished in 11th and 12th

places, respectively, while Bachman,
added an 11th-place finish in the three-
meter event.
Five seniors have departed from last
season's squad, the only standout being
Bachman. So with a strong returning
nucleus, the outlook looks bright for the
1981-82 edition of women's swimming at
Michigan. Last year's crop of
newcomers was one of the strongest
ever-Stunzner, Copp, Hodson, and
Cahill all claimed Big Ten titles last
season.
If Isaac can bring in a similar crop of
standobts this year, the Big Ten crown
might be headed right back to Ann Ar-
bor.

By JAMES THOMPSON
After an impressive second-place
finish behind powerhouse Indiana in the
Big Ten two years ago, coach Bill
Farley's men's swim team dropped to
fourth last season, behind Iowa, the
Hoosiers, and Wisconsin. But despite
the departure of several tankers from
last year's squad through graduation,

Michigan appears strong to contend for
the league title this winter.
Bob Murray; a record-setter in the 50-
and 100-yard freestyle races, along with
freestylers Tom Pederson and John
Slykhouse, are among those whose
graduation loss will be felt. But retur-
ning for the Wolverines after a year's
absence due to injury is Fernando

CANALES RETURNS FROM INJURY
Recruits, boost, tankers

JUNIOR FREESTYLER Tom
Dudley drives through the
water in a 1000-yard freestyle
race against Eastern
Michigan last December. The
Michigan tankers settled for a
disappointing fourth-place
finish at the Big Ten Cham-
pionships in March.

t4

with the swimmers we had," said
Farley. "In fact, we did as well as could
be expected." In order to avoid a
situation in which a fourth-place finish is
"as well as could be expected," Farley
is bringing in several top-notch
recruits.
Two breaststrokers, Tim Gardner
from Cincinnati and Neil Bond from
Brewer, Maine, are set to perform for
the Maize and Blue tankers. Farley also
recruited two of Michigan's top prep-
sters-Kip Kimble of Birmingham
Seaholm and Harry Conales from East
Kentwood High School.
ALSO JOINING the Wolverines this
year are two foreign swimmers-Pe-
ter Smeby from Norway and Roberto
Becerra from Colombia. Farley in-
dicated that Adrian Morehouse and
Paul Hickson, both from England, may
become a part of his squad, as well.
Perhaps the strength of Michigan's
swim team rests with the Wolverine
divers. Diving coach Dick Kimball, who
also coaches the U.S. Olympic divers,
has recruited his son Bruce for this wi -
ter's squad. The younger Kimball is a
national champion on the three-meter
springboardl and could help make the
Wolverines a national power in diving.
Returning from last season's diving
corps is Ron Merriott, who took first
place in every dual meet and third in
the three-meter competition at the Big
Ten competition. Add to him recruits
Kent Ferguson, a four-time Iowa state
champion, Andy Welch of Troy, who
finished fourth in Michigan, and Pat
McClelland, who finished sixth in the
state, and it becomes obvious that the
Wolverines will have an impressive
diving squad. "With these new divers,
and the nucleus we already have, we'll
be very good, and I expect another
great year," said Kimball, the elder.
' All in all, it would appear as though
Michigan certainly has the talent to
contend for the Big Ten's top spot.

0
a

Clynmer
.. on winning medley

-Photo by Mike Pal mieri
/e
"4 .i r... .
r t' 2le ura e- ~ r
R tcaAe 'ca- u
r Jxi Ke 0 tt t , , , , d ,. *u , t e }-.
1% ~ o ov\cL a5_ }b ~. .o e1
- - cm' tat- tth vt t t - StCrs , e.14eu
.tI SI r- }
-es ddtit Ce be OI b
.e T } .(t VW I
e'C'fo tn-l l y.ie teg A d L Lea cc,
- E1LVĀ° LJ e e' t \ato t 1uet rack 1,P rt'~ e , Tent ,ti neltt b
we' o an,,'.nl\'tk t u}a br
ytte r ,ua. *'pBo o t1
n~~~~~~~~~ '}actr t'Ie wr %et1, ,tega II 'een 1. ~adent
We're the St that oved~f\ ii
Vymou Fi'S ep rsnDn ott1 tt n .to..d"Longest!

Canales, a world-class freestyler from
Puerto Rico.
"FERNANDO WILL give the team a
lot of help," said Farley. "I expect him
to be one of our top competitors."
Farley indicated that sophomore
freestyler Mark Noetzel, junior Bruce
Gemmell, and seniors Walter Gage and
Scott Crowder will also play a big part
in determining this season's fortunes.
"I think the team did fine (last year)

0

M'

among U.S.

synchro elite
By JOE CHAPELLE
If you are under the impression that football, baseball, and tennis are the only
sports in which Michigan continually contends for national championships, be sure
to add synchronized swimming to that list. The Wolverines placed third in last
year's AIAW national championship meet behind Arizona and Ohio State, and look
like a strong bet to contend for the top spot again this year.
Last season was highlighted by the performances of several standout swim-
mers. Departed senior Ruth Pickett started the campaign off with a big splash by
being honored with her second straight Broderick Award-the "Heisman Trophy"
of synchronized swimming. But once the season began, it was juniors Cathleen
O'Brien and Betsy Neira who stole the show. Both women qualified to compete in
the U.S. Synchronized Swimming Championships and the Canadian National Syn-
chronized Swimming Championships. At the latter meet, Neira and O'Brien
finished 19th in the duet competition.
COACH JOYCE LINDEMAN is optimistic that her swimmers will once again
finish the season among the nation's elite this winter, but still sees her squad as a
notch or two away from the number one spot. "Considering how everybody
(Michigan, Arizona, and Ohio State) did in recruiting, I think we should be in the
same spot this year," she said. "Arizona had the best recruiting class."
But Lindeman added that the
Wolverines fared well in the battle for
incoming freshmen, as well. Probably
the best of the crop, Erin
O'Shaughnessey, comes to Ann Arbor (
by way of Tonawanda, N.Y., and the
coach looks for big things from her. "I
expect her to make our 'A' team and
compete in solo, duet, and team events
for us this year," said Lindeman.
Also joining the Wolverine squad this
season will be Cathy Reed of Summit,
N.J. She attended the prestigious
Olympic Training Camp and is lined up ,
to compete in solo events.
Rounding out the newcomers are -
Laura Berne, who swam with the ! x
Michigan Aquarius Synchronized
Swimming Club in, Birmingham, and
Linda Pritz, who comes from Columbus
and is expected to compete in the teamPc
events. .. Broderick Award winner

01

Long before the turn of the century we were inviting Michigan
students to shop our store. That invitation was always right
there . . . up front.
You might note we are the only retailer from the front page of
this1 io iianDailvtats +ks till ; buiess.

That early invitation remains open. We're a nice store, with
nice things. For nice people. We're Wild's, Quality Importers,
Haberdashers and Tailors. When you're ready= for us we're
ready for you.
Remember who loved you first!

m

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan