100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 17, 1981 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 6-Tuesday, November 17, 1981-The Michigan Daily

Reagan fires civil rights

head

WASHINGTON (AP)- Arthur Flemming was
replaced as chairman of the U.S. Civil Rights Com-
mission yesterday, minutes before he made public a
report criticizing the Reagan administration's
policies on school desegregation.
Flemming, a 76-year-old Republican, had been
chairman of the commission since 1974. He had been
publicly critical of the president's civil rights policies
prior to yesterday's news conference, during which
he said the administration's views on school
desegregation "are in conflict with the Constitution."
A spokesman for the civil rights office, Charles
Rivera, said he "rather doubted" that there was a
connection between yesterday's dismissal and
Flemming's remarks. He said there have been
rumors of possible changes for several weeks.
BUT RIVERA said it was unusual to replace com-
missioners, who are appointed by the president for
open-ended terms.
Robin Gray, a White House spokesman, said

Flemming was telephoned yesterday morning and
told he was being replaced.
Larry Speakes, the president's deputy press
secretary, said: "I think the president wanted an op-
portunity to have his own appointee in the post.
Flemming had served for a number of years with
honor. He's a distinguished public servant, but the
president felt he would like to appoint Mr. Pendleton
to the job who has an outstanding record in the field of
civil rights."
CLARANCE Pendleton, president of the Urban
League of San Diego, was named to replace Flem-
ming. The White House also said that commission
member Stephen Horn was being replaced by Mary
Louise Smith, former national chairwoman of the
Republican Party.
In the past, Flemming has criticized the Reagan
administration for budget cuts in areas like legal ser-
vices for the poor, its decision to refuse to pursue af-
firmative action as remedy for job discrimination,
and for the Education Department's decision to try to

avoid enforcing equal employment laws in schools
;which receive federal funds.
Yesterday, Flemming said the commission
"believed strongly that progress toward the goal of
school desegregation will not be achieved without a
clear spirit of national leadership. We appeal to them
to make that commitment."
FLEMMING SPOKE at d news conference called
to release a commission report on the progress of
school desegregation entitled "With All Deliberate
Speed: 1954-19??"
Flemming said that desegregation had disturbed
the status quo and created a backlash aimed at the
methods used to achieve desegregation, notably pupil
assignment and busing.
Flemming said that busing is essential in some
cases. "The only way to break up a segregated
system is by the reassignment of students. Some of
those students are going to need transportation," he
said.

0

. : r. ..: :._ .. _ _ _ _ __ _ __ _ _ _ __ ___ _ _ __ _ _
. . .. , ,. .. s. ..::r....i ..:::.::.:::.
. .. .. ...... ........... ....,.............................. .....,. ........ ..... ............................................: ...:":::.:...:. :::..:.:..:.:::.:. .. ".:..:,,.:....i,....... .......r....... ... ... .... .. ..... . 1...... ..... . ...... . . ... .
_ . ._. ., ... ............................................................. ............... ....,.............. .. ... ... ....., .......,...r........................r .s ........................,... ...fi::::::. ,...{.::. , {.::....
.. lI, ,......,.. .... ._ _ ......................... ......... .......... ......r...... ...... ... ..... ...... .a ...... .....r........... ... ................................................ ......... ..x .........., .......'#'... . ., .,.. .
. 1, .........................::::::::: "::.:.::: ":: }:.. ::::::"::::. i"}h:"?: :::"}i:}:.:...... .:::":::::::+:::::. ::: : v
.. .i......... ..............................r....,...............o..r....,....... .............r.................................................. . ..... .... ..: ..' ".. ..
.. . .. ....... ....:.{:.:}::::..: :.:. : :w:. ::::::.:v::iv^}:iii:: iiir.^;::"i; is Y.iv? iivii: iii:}ii: i}iii}::.v.,.....v...v.. ..... ..k.,..4v.' .^

Regents
may look,
at MERC
decision
',Thursday

(Continued from Page 1)
development of this department is one
of the University's high priorities.
Regents will also be presented with
information about the University
operating budgets for 1981-82. Accor-
ding to Bob Sauve, budget advisor to
Frye, no specific points have yet been
chosen for the presentation.
SAUVE SAID planning for specific
portions of the budget has been difficult
the past few years because of in-
creasing economic pressures on the
University from the state. Planners
used to be able to get a head start on the
next year's budget by planning around
recommendations made by the gover-
nor to the state legislature in the early
part of each year, Sauve said.

The Regents will also be presented
with copies of the MSA's annual report
and background information on the
University's expanding research
budget.
ACCORDING TO the report to be
presented by Vice President for
Research Charles Overberger, resear-
ch expenditures have increased by 19.1
percent since last year and in "real
dollar" terms-after allowing for in-
flation-by 18.2 percent in the last 10
years.
More than 70 percent of these funds
come from federal agencies, the report
says, while 12.6 percent-some 116.4
million-is provided by the University.
The largest increase was in physical

science research, which received 43.9
percent more than it did last year.
Engineering research funds increased
the least with only a 1.8 percent hike.
The Regents will also hear comments
by six SACUA members. Following
Morton Brown's presentation of an
overview of faculty governance,
Thomas Senior will discuss the Univer-
sity'd research environment, Ronald
Bishop will speak about academic af-
fairs, and Mary Ann Swain will report
on budget priorities. Donald Brown is
scheduled to discuss' the economic
status of the faculty and Richmond
Browne will brief the Regents on tenure
issues.

:.E~ :..~ .. x ..... ......... ...,.. ... . ............:::. ............,."::
'Students lead latest wave of Polish unrest

Daily Photo by BRIAN MASK
Winter's shadow
The bare branches of overhanging trees cast a shadow over two students
strolling in the sun of yesterday's unseasonably warm "calm before the
storm."
Shapiro calls for
enhanced'U' research*
(Continued from Page 1)

WARSAW, Poland (AP) - About
30,000 students struck at seven schools
yesterday as the ruling Communists
and independent Solidarity union
prepared to discuss sharing power to
solve Poland's crises.
"Crucial is the right word for
describing the talks," a government of=
ficial said of the meeting which starts
today.
"The success of this meeting will be
decisive to the future of the line of
dialogue, common understanding and
reform," said the official, who

requested anonymity.
NAGGING LABOR. protests con-
tinued yesterday despite the gover-
nment demand for worker peace as a
precondition to the talks. But
negotiations were started to end a news
vendors strike that has kept papers off
hewsstands in much of the country sin-
ce last week. The vendors are angry
over reduced commissions.
In Siedlce, about 62 miles east of
Warsaw, farmers occupied the local
Communist youth headquarters for the
11th day. They want more self-

government, private land and food. A
spokesman said a farmers delegation
met in Warsaw with government of-
ficials but apparently made no
progress.
The national Independent Students
Association said about 30,000 students
boycotted classes or stated sit-ins at
higher education institutins in War-
saw, Wroclaw and Tzeszow. The
association called for all university
students to strike by Nov. 24.
THEY DEMANDED improved
higher education laws and support for
colleagues at Radom engineering
school, where students were in the 22nd
day of a sit-in strike over the disputed
election of the school rector.
"We'd like to end the strike as soon as
possible, but that requires '...meeting,
our demands," a spokeswoman for the
Radom students said.
The association said students oc-
cupied classrooms and offices at War-
saw University, Warsaw Polytechnical
Institute, Warsaw Economics
Academy, Wroclaw University,
Wroclaw Agricultural Academy,

Rzeszow Teachers College and Rzesow
Polytechnical Institute.
SOLIDARITY leader Lech Walesa
conferred with his negotiators in War-
saw on the eve of the talks with the
government. The government, mean-
while, publicized arguments for a broad
but party-dominated "front of national
accord" to solve worsening food shor-
tages and declining production.
"There is no other way out," the par-
ty daily newspaper Trybuna Ludu said
of the government proposal. "The
other way out would mean either
staying immersed in this chaos and
misery, or a tragedy of a nation being
split asunder, a tragedy whose propor-
tions we could scarcely imagine."
The paper apparently was referring
to Solidarity's counter proposal for
economic partnership with the gover-
nment.
Part officials say that proposal will
give too much power to Solidarity, the
first independent union in the Soviet
bloc. The union was formed in August
1980 during nationwide strikes, and
claims 9.5 million members.

4 ,

-I

research projects, and how and where
to make the distinction between
primary researchers and regular
teaching faculty.
The Univesity could subsidize an in-
creased research output, Shapiro said,
but he added that this is a decision that
must be addressed by the academic
community.
Shapiro defended the administration
against charges that it was neglecting
funds for the humanitites, stressing the
administration "cared a lot" about
support of the arts.
Shapiro said federal support of
research is and will continue to be un-
der "considerable stress." He said the
proportion of federal money for resear-
ch has fallen by half since 1965.
"THE ENVIRONMENT around us is
changing and changing quickly,"
Shapiro said of the diminishing federal
support.
He estimated that to make up for the
coming drop in federal support for

research, money coming from the
private sector and industry would have
to triple.
The President also noted that the Uni
versity has in the past taken a "conser-
vative" attitude toward attracting in-
dustry funds for research, but he added
that he thought the proposed Michigan
Research Corporation is probably "a
good idea."
The MRC, which was proposed by a
University task force last month, is a
non-profit, tax-exempt, corporation
designed to solicit industry funds for
Ulniversity research.
Shapiro added that the University
must be "cautious" about having
a monetary involvement with a resear-
ch corporation.
It has been proposed that the MRC
will bring monetary benefits to
professors conducting research within
the corporation if their projects earn
profits on patents or royalties.

EXCITEMENT

* TRAVEL

* RESPONSIBILITY
INVESTIGATE THE NAVY
ALTERNATIVE
2 Year Scholarships
Available

I

My neighbor, a skilled dietician,
Whose word is above all suspicion,
Said, "I choose what I please,
Get my A's, C's, and B's;
At the League I enjoy good nutrition."
S.R.
The chigan t/
LdJie Next to Hill Auditorium
Located in the heart of the campus,
it is the heart of the campus.

Lunch,11:30 to 1:15
Dinner 5:00 to 7:15
SPECIAL LOW PRICES FOR
STUDENTS
Send your League Limerick to:
Manager, Michigan League
227 South Ingalls
You will receive 2 free dinner
tickets if your limerick is used in
one of our ads.

Mc Vicar'fails to
hide from boredom

CONTACT:

ENS. Carl Plumley,
Room 214 West Engineering
Wednesdays, 9:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

(Continued from Page 5)
enrolled in a college extension course,
graduated and became a successful
commentator and radio broadcaster.

r ./

SOME REASONS TO CALL
LON ITNEAND SAVE 50%

;

NOW YOU CAN SAVE 50%
ON YOUR LONG DISTANCE
CALLS IN MICHIGAN! Clip Save

After the two hours of running around
inside of prison, the viewer is left with
the idea that you can do whatever you
want as long as you become famous.
An American film, Thief, was much
better at capturing the nervius, wound-
up, life of the criminal. Through the use
of lighting, crystal-clear photography,
and fanatically intense acting by James
Caan and the rest of the cast, the film
seemed to pulsate with its own inner
tensions. Mc Vicar is aTV move-of-
the-week version of Thief. Everything
is second-class: acting, script, and
direction.
The only reasonably interesting
aspect of the film, is the music. Several
songs' by the Who are 1itroduced,
notably the first song "Free Me."
Using their angry, frustrated rock, the
Who's songs are the best means of un-
derstanding what emotions are sup-
posed to be in the movie. Daltrey's
singing is far superior to his acting in
presenting a vision of mental turmoil
that is absent in his character.
McVicar could have been a very good
film. But the lact of talent around the
production conspires to create a film
devoid of any internal meaning and
having no connection with the real
world.
LSAT -"MCAT -GRE
GRE PSYCH - GRE 810" -MAT
GMAT -DAT -OCAT- "PCAT
VAT.SAT. ACT* CPA-TOEFL
MSKP -NAT'L MED BDS

Iz

I

F:_.

MON TUE I WED I THU FRI SAT SUN
8 am - 8 am
'ULL RATE
# 5pm- 5pm
EVENING DISCOUNT PERIODS EVENING
*30% DISCOUNT DISCOUNT
11pm 11pm
* 3IHT AND WEEKEND DISCOUNT PERIODS

B :
I :.
I .
U
U :
U:
kU
I V

P115

I

I

TH ER E'S
NO PLACE.
LIKE PHONE!

f wct ELu* . "q k: nr

Al

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan