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November 15, 1981 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-11-15

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, November 15, 1981-Page 5

THE

PUZZLE

--r---~u

375 N MAPLE
769-1300
n MAPLE I A SNPCTR
MON i S2 1P" SAT SUN S2 3PM
John CleeseLL AM RT
Shelley Duvall 1:45 leA HLEEN "Rr4P
Sean Connery 4:00
Katherine Helmond 7:00I
e 9 +a T

I R ilhin

1y duVl ZLUPFAUA
With the world getting
smaller and rapid transit sys-
tems getting larger,,it won't
be long before some of the
world's cities run into one
another.
The following map is a
composite of subway stops
and rapid-transit stations
from here to Hong Kong. We'd
like you to match the cities
with the stations by filling in
the circles on the map with
the number corresponding to
the correct city listed below..

1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)
10)
11)
12)
13)

Paris
Munich
Berlin
Athens
Hamburg
Budapest
Milan
Rome
Rotterdam
Barcelona
Lisbon
Madrid
Washington

14)
15)
16)
17)
18)
19)
20)
21)
22)
23)
24)
25)

Mexico City
Buenos Aires
San Francisco
Tokyo
Philadelphia
Boston
Montreal
Leningrad
Moscow
London
New York
Chicago

EE MEA N I"
~ PLAZA
0EAK FERENC TER DE CASTILLA
" .. AENID
loin EMBARCADERO OMONIA
SAVENIDA POTSDAMER
y , .:LA PLATA PLATZ
uu"mum WACKER DRIVE PADDINGTON
-- . CENTRAAL DAIMON CA A LUNA
('
-0 NEVSKI
RJ>J"- -:. . ST. PAULI PROSPEKT
H .IDA LG;,MARKET
_ COPLEYDUOMO
.-~
. - -": R O S S I O
.FRONTENAC
-L --EGORKY PARK
--COLOSSEO KULTURY
0 0
" ils . BLEECKER
'" " AUSTERLITZ BL EET
- rL- FOGGY BOTTOM
:":-: _L;:, L . . OLYMPIASTADION
- .9
Roe Jone-
- Li--~
- -j- -:-
Roger Jones

momou ' ss 50
*INIVI L ATIS
ri 5r f.,761 9700
THEY LIVE STYLISH SOPHISTICATED
LIVES. THEY ALSO HAVE THE SAME
FEELINGS, PROBLEMS AND HEART
BREAKS YOU HAVE!

WED. SAT. SUN.
$1.50 TIL 6:00 P.M.

GLORIOUS!
GENE SHAL(T1

I

ROBERT DE NIRO
1:45 ROBERT DUVALL
700 F
UNITE0 ARTISTSE
-Two hours of
non stop thrills"
Rex Reed
___ A:AAON

- pa

RICH FM

MERYL STREEP
lheIWt~fCh
Lieutenn

Send your completed puzzle to the
Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann
Arbor, MI 48109 by Wednesday of
next week. One person will be selected
at random from the correct entries to
win a free Michigan Daily T-shirt.
Fed up with these crazy puzzles?
Would you like to get even with Don
Rubin and win $10 to boot? Then send
your original ideas for The Puzzle to
The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St.,
Ann Arbor, 48109. All entries will
become the p-operty of United
Feature Syndicate, Inc. (You only win
the big bucks if we use your puzzle
idea.)
LAST WEEK'S ANSWER:
Finding the Kingdom of Tonga was
the easy part.
The island on the stamp was
Tongatapu. Nuku'alofa, the capital,
was a little harder. We preferred Pea
(actually somewhat closer to the
precise coordinates), but accepted
both.
The following people
week s puzzle correctly:

JACQUEUNE BISSET
CANDICE BERGEN
FRI-7:20, 9:40 - (R).
SAT, SUN-1:20, 3:40, 7:20, 9:40

FRI-7:00, 9:25
SAT, SUN-1, 3:25, 7, 9:25

U

{I

U
U
C
GI)
U)
WU
0

-4-

answered last

Karl Edelmann
Tim Orel

Jon Monroe
Kirk Hornburg

Daniel Herman
Mike Buhler

Suzi Weidenthal
Adam Weisman

Surrogate mother laws challenged,

DETROIT (UPI) - A lawyer who has
gained a national reputation for han-
dling surrogate mother cases says it's
time for new laws regarding paternity
and custody of unborn children.
Attorney Noel Keane of suburban
earborn says the issue of a lawsuit he
-iled in the case of a couple awaiting the
birth of a child by a surrogate mother is
simply "Who is the father of the child?"
THE SUIT asks Wayne County Cir-
cuit Judge Roman Gribbs to declare
George Syrkowski of Dearborn Heights
the father of a child conceived last
March by artificial insemination and

due to be delivered by Corinne Ap-
pleyard about Dec. 17.
The declaration is necessary, Keane
said Friday, because it is illegal in
Michigan to pay a mother to allow
adoption of her child.
The Syrokowskis are unable to have
children themselves and agreed to pay
Mrs. Appleyard $10,000 to carry and
bear the child.
INCLUDED IN the lawsuit were
statements from the surrogate mother
and the doctor who conducted the ar-
tificial insemination, attesting to the
procedure and the agreement.

In a hearing Friday before Gribbs,
Assistant Michigan Attorney General
George Elworth argued that state law
states that a child born as a result of ar-
tificial insemination with the consent of
the husband of the pregnant woman is
automatically considered to be the
husband's child.
Keane said the consent of Roger Ap-
pleyard for the artificial insemination
to take place was not consent to become
legal father of the child.
He said the law cited by Elworth was
aimed at cases where infertile husban-
ds, after allowing their wives to become

impregnated, might change their min-
ds and decide they don't want to sup-
port the child.
"Michigan needs some new laws on
this," he said. "This will set a
precedent for a series of similar cases -
eight or 10 of them - which we have
coming up very soon."
In 1945, the first atomic bomb was
exploded above the desert near the
Almagordo Air Force Base in New
Mexico.

- With
Phillip Moll, harpsichordist
Moray Welsh, cellist
The acclaimed flutist in a special recital
featuring the music of Handel, Couperin, and Bach.
MO NDAY, NOVEMBER 30 RT-8:30
HILL AUDITORIUM
LIMITED SEATING
Tickets at $10.00, $9.00, $8.00, $6.00
Tickets at Burton Tower, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Weekdays 9-4:30, Sat. 9-12 (313)665-3717
61JjVIVE1 sITY &MUSICAL 80CIETY
In Its 103rd Year

I I

Fire blacks out much of downtown Boston

BOSTON (AP) - A manhole fire
knocked out electricity yesterday to
6,500 customers in downtown Boston,
and two-thirds of the area - including
Chinatown and the red-light district -
=could remain without power until
today, officials said.
"We don't expect. to have power
Wstored until 9 or 10 a.m. Sunday mor-
ing," said, Mike Monahan, a

spokesman for Boston Edison. "We're
just advising people to hang tight and
bundle up."
NO INJURIES were reported.
Monahan said the fire was discovered
in a manhole shortly before 1 a.m. The
heat of the fire was so intense it melted
seven cable connections that provided
power in a wide area. Oficials don't
know the cause of the fire.

"The manhole: was a mess," said
Monahan.
The fire initially interrupted elec-
tric service to some 6,500 Boston Edison
customers in the heart of the city, in-
cluding sections of the Tufts New
England Medical Center, Boston
Edison spokesman Walter Salvi said.
The hospital continued normal
operations with the help of emergency

generators.
Electricity was restored to half the
affected area shortly before 10 a.m., in-
cluding the downtown shopping area
and Beacon Hill, where the state capital
and numerous apartment buildings are.
But the garment district, Chinatown
and the Combat Zone - a section of adult
movie houses and striptease cabarets -
were expected to remain in darkness.

rE
bi
I
fa

State must seek an alternative, say speakers
(Continued from Page 1) These industries currently employ AMOND THE KEY elements in im- nment, private investors and the com-
ealization of labor and transport 170,000 workers and by the year 2000, plementation of the plan, Russell said, munity.
arriers. more than half a million persons will are support from local government, Democratic gubernatorial candidate
According to Luria, neither the solar probably be working in these areas. worker input in the planning stages, the Zolton Ferency, who also attended the
nergy industry nor mass transit would "This crisis is permanent and struc- attraction of private capital and central conference, fully endorsed Luria's and
than aifi d criteria- but em- tural and will be with us for a while' planning between workers, the gover- Russell's proposals.

tit tie specneu cr~ t, ULit
ployment by manufacturers of
processing engines, heavy oil recovery
equipment, and steam injection pumps,
which are all in short supply, would be
ideal.

noted Russell,who prior to becoming an
economic consultant to the Michigan
State Senate served as a policy analyst
for Detroit City Council Member Ken
Cockrel. 4

L,.......... o - - ,

Economist: Reagan
.rogram working

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