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November 15, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-11-15

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Page 2-Sunday, November 15, 1981-The Michigan Daily
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850 American troops
jump in military test

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CAIRO WEST AIR BASE, Egypt
(AP) - More than 800 paratroopers
dropped into the Western Desert on
Saturday, beginning the biggest test of
America's Rapid Deployment Force.
One jumper broke his hip, three suf-
fered less serious injuries and a 2%-ton
truck crumpled when its chute failed.
The windless, clear blue sky was
filled with olive drab parachutes as 850
Americans, 10 Egyptians, and their
equipment - including trucks, howit-
zers and mortars-were drop-
ped from 18 C-141 and six C-130 tran-
sport planes.
LESS THAN six minutes elapsed
before the first platform of equipment
was dropped and the last soldier hit the
sand. Each carried a 60-pound pack
and an M-16 rifle. The operation began
about a minute ahead of schedule.
The semi-official newspaper Al-
Ahram said in its Sunday edition that
two AWACS radar planes took part in
the exercises. U.S. military officials
said yesterday afternoon they had no
information on the AWACS in-
volvement, but an American military
spokesman had said earlier in the week
that use of the aircraft was being con-
sidered.
Fifty-seven platforms of heavy
equipment were dropped from the
planes at an altitude of 1,500 feet. The
troopers were dropped from about 800
feet.
ONE U.S. MAJOR broke his hip when
he landed. The lesser injuries included
a sprained ankle and a pulled back
Poetry Reading
with
Charlotte Nekola
and Judith Kerman
MONDAY, NOV. 16
8:00 P.M.
ADMISSION FREE
GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe (662-5189)

muscle, officials said. The injured
were not identified.
The parachute of one equipment plat-
form failed to open, and a 5,000 pound,
eight-wheeled vehicle crumpled when it
crashed into the desert, officials said.
They said the mishaps were fewer than
expected.
The officials also said a Special For-
ces team parachuted into the Zone
Saturday night from an altitude of
10,000 feet. They refused to say how
many men took part in the jump.
THE MOCK assault on the war
games field of this Egyptian air base 18
miles west of Cairo was part of the
Bright Star '82, the month-long test that
involves 4,000 Americans in Egypt and
2,000 in exercises in Sudan, Somalia and
Oman.
Six of the C-141s carried troops of the
82nd Airborne Division 14 hours non-
stop from Pope Air Force Base, N.D.,
and the rest of the planes flew from four
undisclosed sites in Europe.
The troops that came by way of
Europe had four hours' rest at bases
there before linking up with the others
over the Mediterranean and heading to
Cairo West.
A-10 Thunderbolt jetfighters flew
mock sorties over the field before,
during and after the operation, in which
the 82nd linked up with the 24th
Mechanized Division of Fort Stewart,
Ga., which reached Egypt last week by
ship and plane, and secured the mock
target.

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Nov. 19-22
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President
roams the
wilds for
turkeys
PEARSALL, Texas (UPI)-
President Reagan donned a well-worn
camouflage outfit and armed himself
with a shotgun yesterday to hunt wild
turkeys on a dusty Texas hill country
ranch.
Although the president said, "I've
never gone turkey hunting," his chan-
ces for success were good since the
sprawling ranch is populated with bet-
ween 700 and 800 turkeys.
THE SMILING president piled into a
red jeep caked with dust and spoke with
reporters briefly.
Retired investment banker J.O. Win-
ston was the president's host at the 500-
acre spread in rugged, mesquite-
covered hills about 90 miles west of San
Antonio.
Reagan was outfitted with a 12-gauge
shotgun and a non-resident hunting
permit as he set out on the trip in
balmy, autumn weather accompanied
by White House aides James Baker and
Michael Deaver and a Secret Service
agent in the open jeep.
THE PRESIDENT was to hide in a
hunting blind made from a pile of scrub
brush to await his shot at a passing
turkey.
Winston said Reagan's chances were
good because "there's a world of turkey
here now." But, apparently referring to
other hunters in the area, the rancher
said Reagan's success also could
depend on "how little company he has."

INBRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
IRA kills Parliament
member at teenage dance
BELFAST, Northern Ireland- Three masked Irish Republican Army
guerrillas shoved past 60 horrified teen-agers at a dance yesterday and
fatally shot the Rev. Robert Bradford, a hardline Protestant member of the
British Parliament. The gunmen also killed a caretaker at the door as they
fled.
Witnesses told police two of the killers wore Halloween masks and the
third had a white handkerchief over his face in the attack at the Finaghy
Community Center on the outskirts of Belfast. All three wore workmen's
coveralls, witnesses said.
Screaming and crying youngsters scrambled for cover under tables, and
one hurled a chair at the fleeing gunmen, who fired six bullets into Bradford
and three into the caretaker. None of the youths was-hurt, but witnesses said
some were taken to nearby homes and treated for shock.
Police accused the guerrillas of trying to provoke "virtual civil war," and
British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher vowed "to cleanse our country of
the evil of terrorism.'
Dying child gets transplant
PITTSBURGH- Surgeons yesterday transplanted a liver into a 2-year-old
girl dying of cancer, hours after a heartrending plea from her parents and a
race halfway across the country with the donated organ.
The child, Lauren Toohey of Kinnelon, N.J., was listed as "critical" in an
intensive care unit at Children's Hospital, where she underwent the 8% hour
transplant operation.
The liver donor was a 4-year-old girl from Wisconsin who died in an ac-
cident Friday. Her parents agreed to donate the organ in the hope that
Lauren's life might be saved.
Doctors said that without the transplant, the child would have only 3 to 6
months to live.
Labor breaking flying boycott
CLEVELAND - Several labor leaders, citing recent shifts in union
policies on the air traffic controllers' strike, are breaking an unofficial
boycott and flying again on union business.
The United Steelworkers of America, United Auto Workers and .Com-
munications Workers of America are among major unions that have quietly
ended prohibitions against air travel instituted shortly after 13,000 members
of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers struck illegally Aug. 3.
Joseph Murphy, vice president of the Service Employees International
Union in Cleveland, said he broke the informal boycott after putting 20,000
miles on his car.
"I was just killing myself trying to cover five states," he said.
AFL-CIO president Lane Kirkland, however, denied his union softened its
recommendation to members to fly only when necessary.
Polish government bows
to avert dairy strike
Warsaw, Poland - Dairy workers yesterday abruptly cancelled a planned
strike that would have cut off Poland's supply of milk and eggs. The gover-
nment gave in to the demands of the workers and rebuffed hardliners,
defending negotiations with Solidarity as the only alternative to bloodshed.
"What can you do with such as mad idea as a milkman strike?" Gen.
Wolciech Jaruzelski, the ;premier and. Communist Party. leader, whose
government bowed to the dairymakers renegade unions demands for more
pay to avert the threatened Nov. 23 strike.
In a new, indirect warning, the Soviet Union hinted Poland would risk its
independence if it abandoned socialism. The warning was contained in let-
ters from Soviet citizens printed in the Communist Party newspaper Prav-
da.
4f1! M~ihigjan 1 atlj
Vol. XCII, No. 58
Sunday, November 15, 1981
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NOVEMBER 15-21 SL

Editor-in-thief ..:................. SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor ................ JULIE ENGE8RECHT
University Editor... _.............LORENZO SENET
News Editor.......................DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors ........... CHARLES THOMSON
KEVIN TOTTIS
Sports Editor ................ . ..MARK MIHANOVIC
Associate Sports Editors ............ GREG DeGULIS
MARK FISCHER
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DREW SHARP
Chief Photographer.............. PAUL ENGSTROM
PHOTOGRAPHERS-Jackie Bell, Kim Hill, Deborah
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ARTISTS: Robert Lence. Jonathan Stewart. Richard
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PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER FNOVEMBER DECEMBER
as461 2 3 13 45 67 12 34 5
1011t12 4 6 78 910r 8 0 11 12 1314 6 8 91011t12
131 1516 17 18 19 11 1314 15 16 17 151 17 18 192021
2290 25 ~6 27 28 29 30 31AI________
1982
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL

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