100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 13, 1981 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-11-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-Friday, November 13, 1981--The Michigan Daily
Reaganomics benefits
nation, Schultz says

i
M.
44
4.
4v
it
'a,

(Continued from Page 1)
government are wearing Adam Smith
ties."
BUT IT IS not just a monetary policy,
Schultz said, because it involves
macroeconomic and microeconomic
aspects encompassing the entire struc-
ture of the national economy.
The action of the current ad-
ministration has been a reversal of
Keynesian economics, Schultz said.
Keynes said government was to take up
the slack in capital investment and
people realize that it doesn't work
today, Schultz said.
'We have shorted ourselves of in-
vestment and savings," Schultz said.
The attitude should be one in favor of
savings, because investment comes
basically from savings, he said.
AT A NEWS conference before his
speech, Schultz said that the recent

comments by Budget Director David
Stockman "will pose a problem for
him," but that Stockman was a man of
"extraordinary ability and integrity"
and could recover from the controver-
sy.
The business community is solidly
behind the Rteagan program, Schultz
said. The financial community,
however, is suffering from fluctuations
in the market, and their undertainty is
reflected in their words and actions, he
said.
If the Reagan progranm works,
Schultz said, it will change the, inter-
national posture of this. country. The
dollar will be strengthened, which will
lead to a more advantageous trade
position, he said.
"WE ARE IN the midst of actions
that will change the drift of the past
decades," Schultz said. The winners in
management positions will be those
who anticipate the advantages of the
changes and take the right actions.
Schultz is~ also presently a part-time
professor at Stanford University and a
member of the board of directors of
General Motors and Dillon, Reed and
Co., Inc.
Introduced by Graduate Business
School Dean Gilbert Whitaker, Schultz
was presented the award by Student
Council President and Vice President
Charles Rothstein and Scott Finerman.
Those present at the ceremony in-
cluded University President Harold
Shapiro, Business Prof. Paul Mc-
Cracken, and General Motors Chair-
man Roger Smith.

See your Jostens' Representative.
Date: Mon.-Fri.
Time: 11-4
Place: Main Lobby-Michigan Union
ze

Join
News Staff

a ,,

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Death penalty sought
for alleged Sadat assassins
CAIRO, Egypt- Egypt's military prosecutor asked the, death penalty for
all 24 people indicted yesterday in the assassination of President Anwar
Sadat. Military executions in Egypt usually are by firing squad, but the
defense minister urged a public hanging for the prime suspect.
The court-martial begins Nov. 21, and the initial session will be open to the
public. The official Middle East News Agency, quoting the indictment, said
the four main defendants were charged with premeditated murder, a capital
crime.
The indictment accused Lt. Khaled Ahmed Shawki el-Islambouly with
leading the attack on Sadat at a military parade outside Cairo on Oct. 6.The
attackers halted their truck in front of the reviewing stand, then stormed the
stand with guns blazing. According to the indictment, they killed Sadat and
seven other people and wounded 27.
Poland negotiations delayed
WARSAW, Poland- Spreading strikes by about 450,000 workers, far-
mhands and students forced postponement yesterday of negotiations bet-
ween Solidarity and the Communist government.
The regime asked for a four-day delay until Tuesday in opening the talks
and indicated the long-awaited negotiations on political and economic
reforms might not begin until labor peace returns to Poland.
"The strike situation complicates a lot of problems," a spokesman for the
government said. "It is difficultto sit'down at the negotiating table when the
strikes continue."
The biggest new strike yesterday, a sit-in protest by more than 190,000
university students across the country, had no immediate economic impact.
But strike leaders who initially said they would occupy their classrooms for
only six hours changed their minds later and told individual campuses to
decide whether the protest should continue indefinitely.
Prime rate drops
NEW YORK- Several large commercial banks, led by Chase Manhattan,
yesterday lowered their prime lending rates to 161/ percent from the
prevailing 17 percent amid predictions that both short and long-term interest
rates drop.
Philip Braverman, a senior economist at Chase, said, "We have sufficient
factors in place to suggest that this is indeed a sustainable decline in long
and short-term interest rates and it should continue through the end of the
year.~
Chase, the third largest bank in the country,was immediately followed by
Continental Illinois and First Natiofal Bank of Chicago, and Mitsui
Manufacturers Bank of Los Angeles.
GOP balks at Reagan budget
WASHINGTON- Republicans on the Senate Budget Committee moved to
the brink of revolt against President Reagan's budget plan yesterday,
criticizing his cal to wait until next year before considering tax increases or
cuts in benefits.
But as the panel opened debate on a spending plan for 1982, Republican
and Democrat sources cautioned that there was no clear majority either for
Reagan's position or an alternative designed to balance the budget in 1984.
Seven of the committee's 12 Republican members expressed preference
for the alternative, developed by committee chairman Sen. Pete Domenici.
It calls for $48 billion in higher taxes, $40 billion in cuts in programs such as
food stamps and Medicaid and doubling the $13 billion Reagan wants trim-
med from the defense buildup.
Reagan has urged the House and Senate to delay until next year any con-
sideration of possible tax increases or cuts in benefit programs. He conceded
his campaign promise,of a balanced budget in 1984 is an "unlikelihood."
Vol. XCII, No. 56
Friday, November 13, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by'students at The Univer-
city of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 49109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109.
The Michigan-Doify is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles imes Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.

News room: (313) 764-0552: 76-DAILY. Sports desk. 764-0562: Circulation. 764-0558; Classified Advertising.
764-0557; Display advertising. 764-055 Billing, 764.0550.

0

Ii

starring
Miller High Life

it

e

- Ua,

ist be
F~resbm .i

'a.

I

I

'v

01

I

n

S1

I

i

1

Editor-in-thief ....................,SARA ANSPACH

Managing Editor..........
University Editor ........ .
News Editor ............ .
Opinion Page Editors ......
Sports Editor ...:.........
Associate Sports Editors ...
Chief Photographer ..... .
PHOTOGRAPHERS- Jackie
Lewis, Mike Lucas. Brian Mc

.......JULIE E4GE8RECHT
........LORENZO GENET
........ DAVD MEYER
.... CHARLES THOMSON
KEVIN TOTTIS
.......MARK MIHANOVIC
..... GREGDeGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
GREW SHARP
... PAUL .ENGSTROM
Bell. Kim Hill. Deborah

X1

I

J

0

IU

SPORTS STAFF: Barb-Barker, Jesse Borkin, Tom Bent.
ley. Randy Berger. Mark Borowski, Joe Chapelle.
Martha Craft. Jim Dworman, Larry Freed. Chuck Hart-
wig, Matt Henehan. Chuck Joffe. John Kerr: Doug
Levy. Jim Lombard. Lorry Mishkin. Dan Newman. Ron
Pollack. Jeff Quicksilver. Steve Schaumberger. Sarah
Sherber. Kenny Shore. James Thompson, Kent Wolley
Chris Wilson. Bob Wojnowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager ..,. RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager,......... ..BARB FORSLUND
Operations manager.............SUSANNE KELLY
Display Manager ..MARY ANN MISIEWICZ
Classifieds Manager............. DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager..............MICHAEL YORICK
Assistant Display Manager.......... NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals ManagerNSUSAN RABUSHKA
Circulotion Monager .. . KIM WOODS
Sales Coordinator...........E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Liz Altman. Hope Barron. Alan Blum.
Daniel Bowen. Lindsay Bray. Joseph Broda. Glen Con-
tor, Alexander DePillis. Susan Epps. ,Wendy Fox.
Sebastian Frcko. Mark Freeman. Marci Gittelmon.
Pamela Gould. Kathryn Hendrick. Anthony Interronte.
Indre Liatkus, Beth Kovinsky. Caryn Natiss. Felice
Oper; Jodi Pollock. Ann Sachor. Michael Sovitt.
Michael Seltzer. Karen Silverstein. Sam Slaughter.
Nancy Thompson. Jeffrey Voight.

lI

I

Si

I

I

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F S SM T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F $
123 1 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
1011 12 4 6 7 8 9 10, 8 10I11 121314 6 8 9 101112
13 1516 17 18 19 1t 13 14 15 16 17 15 17-18 19 20 21
20 224 5 26 18 -20 21 22 23 24 22 24 25 2640?48 7 ?9-
27 2930 25 627 2829 3031
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCHT APRIL

ARTISTS: Robert Lence, Jonathan Stewart. Richard
'Walk. Norm Christianson.
ARTS STAFF: Richard Campbell, Jane Carl. James Clin-
ton, Mark Dighton. Michael Huget. Adam Knee. Pam
Kramer, Gail Negbour. Carol Ponemon. RJ Smith. Ben
Ticho.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam. Beth Allen. Julie Barth.
Andrew Chapman, Lisa Crumrine, Ann MarieFazio.
Pam Fickinger, Joyce Frieden, Mark Gindin. Julie.Hin.
ds. Steve Hook. Kathlyn Hoover. Horlon Kohn. Mincy
Loyne. Mike McIntyre. Jennifer Miller. Don Oberrot-
man. Stacy Powell. Janet Rae. David Spok. Fannie
Weinstein. Barry Witt

I

L

I

I

K46

2

IU

m

14

-o 1'-

0

gal

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan