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November 12, 1981 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-11-12

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Page 10--Thursday, November 12, 1981-The Michigan Daily
Prof allegedly
threatened by
student'
By STACY POWELL questioned the student at the request
A University undergraduate was of the professor.
questioned Nov. 2 by the Univrsity Th
Department of Safety in connection undenrfessor, who asked to remain
with a class paper he wrote allegedlyu, saide does not believe
threatening his professor. he is in any personal danger at this
thaeAnn Ahirs s ytime and that the situation is under
The Ann Arbor News said yesterday control.
that criminal proceedings against the
student are underway. However, ac- LSA Assistant Dean Eugene Nissen
cording to the professor involved and said the process for investigating a
Walter Stevens, director of the Depar- threat is a long one. A professor must
tment of Safety, the case has not been go through hearing procedures to
classified as a criminal matter. determine the accuracy of the
alegations. "A decision may take a
The Ann Arbor Police public infor- week to two weeks," Nissen said.
mation spokesperson was unavailable
for comment yesterday. Nissen said there have been about
three or four faculty members
STEVENS SAID his department allegedly threatened by students in
has not filed a report with the Ann Ar- the past five years. "We should have a
bor Police and that he is not aware of policy in place which allows a com-
any other office that has filed mittee to' act swiftly in cases of
criminal charges. Stevens said he harassment," he said.

Cancer research

New blood treatment shrinks tumors

BOSTON (AP)- Large cancerous tumors can be
shrunk dramatically by washing small amounts of
the patient's blood with protein from a common bac-
teria, according to a new study.
The work may represent a ;unique approach to
treating cancer, but doctors caution that it is ex-
perimental and needs far more study. The, bacteria
from which the protein is taken has been linked to a
variety of ailments, including toxic shock syndrome.
RESEARCHERS have used the new treatment so
far on five victims of breast cancer, and in four of
them, the therapy reduced the size of their tumors
between 33 percent and 80 percent.
Although the doctors are not sure exactly how the
treatment works, they think it somehow activates a
natural cancer defense system that exists in the blood
of victims of the disease.

The study was directed by Dr. David Terman at
Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. It was
published in today's issue of the New England Jour-
nal of Medicine.
THE SPECIAL ingredient in this treatment is
protein A, a substance found in the cell walls of the
bacteria Staphylococcus aureus. When it infects the
body, this common germ can cause a variety of ills,
among them endocarditis, an inflammation of the
heart lining, and osteomyelitis, an inflammation of
the bones. It also has been associated with toxic
shock syndrome, a mysterious and sometimes fatal
ailment linked to tampon use.
The doctors mixed protein A with cellulose and
charcoal, then poured a sample of the patient's blood
serum through it.

The washed blood, put back into the patient, seems
to go to work almost immediately. The patient
quickly feels pain in her tumor and within as little as
two days, the cancer cells begin to die.
ALL OF THE patients treated so far had large
tumors in their chest walls resulting from breast
cancer, and all but one had had a mastectomy. Their
cancer had relapsed after they had undergone stan-
dard kinds of therapy.
In.a single treatment, the doctors filter and replace
as little as a fraction of an ounce of blood or as much
as seven ounces.
The doctors believe that patients with cancer have
antibodies in their blood that fight cancer, but for
some reason, these natural disease killers fail to
work.

GM workers show high cancer rate

Swedish wildlife officials estimate
that there are more than 200,000 elk
roaming the country. Police statistics
show that one acident in three on coun-
try roads is caused by an elk or other
wild animals.

DETROIT (UPI) -- A study conduc-
ted by University and General Motors
Corp. researchers released yesterday
revealed a colon-rectum cancer rate
nearly three times higher than the
national average among workers in GM
woodshops.
But researchers from the firm and
the University warned the rate may be
"artificially high" because of the close
scrutiny given the ailments of the 5,007
participants.
THE STUDY detected 26 cases of

cancer among employees of the GM's
workshops. Of those, nine were colon -
rectum cancer, another three closely
related. This is nearly three times the
national rate.
Of the group, seven were 60 years of
age or older and two were retired.
GM launched the $1.3 million study a
year ago following a Sloan-Kettering
Institute report showing an abnormal
incidence of cancer among the pattern
and model makers.
DR. ROBERT Wiencek, who headed

the research team that included
University Prof. Victor Hawthorne,
said no cause for the high cancer rate
has been found.
"We don't have enough data to link it
to any specific item," Wiencek said.
The rate may be artificially high. We
may have found much more cancer
than we would have found under nor-
mal conditions."
He stressed that the findings of the
study are "preliminary" and that
researchers will not know for several

years whether the rate is a true reflec-
tion of the incidence of cancer in the
wood workers.
HOWEVER, United Auto Workers
Vice President Owen Biebersaid the
union is "greatly concerned" by the
study's findings.
'Although GM's study calls this a
'preliminary conclusion,' we find it
alarming," Bieber said. "It obviously
necessitates an all-out effort to pursue
this matter vigorously and speedily."

Nuclear threat discussed

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in cooperation with UAC-MEDIATRICS

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(Continued from Page 1)
Energy Agency to prevent idversion of
nuclear fuels to developing countries.
ZIMMERMAN spoke on the Soviet
Union's nuclear capabilities and
strategies.
"The image of the monolithic charac-
ter of the Soviet Union needs finally to
be put to rest," Zimmerman said, ex-.
plaining that the tendency to view the
INTERNATIONAL
CAREER?
A representative
will be on the campus
THURSDAY
NOVEMBER 19, 1981
to discuss qualifications for
advanced study at
AMERICAN
GRADUATE SCHOOL
and job opportunities
in the field of
INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT
Interviews may be scheduled at
CAREER PLANNING
& PLACEMENT
AMERICAN GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT
Thunderbird Campus
Glendale, Arizona 85306

USSR as a united actor in foreign policy
is inaccurate.
"The threat lies in the political uses
of their military force," Zimmerman
said. He said the Soviets are increasing
their nuclear capability "more with a
view to affecting behavior, short of or
without war. They want to manipulate
perspectives with respect to world
power."
SINGER'S remarks focused on the
threat posed by the two superpowers,
the United States and the Soviet Union
He prefaced his remarks with a call for*
more extensive commitments to peace
research.
"There is not nearly enough
systematic, rigorous,. quantitative
research available," he said. "We are
today victims of the collective ignoran-
ce of mankind regarding international
conflicts."
According to Singer, both the United
States and the Soviet Union are "highly
pluralistic with clashing interest
groups and inconsistent goal
priorities." He said one of the driving
forces behind proliferation is the ten-
dency of the" two countries to regard
nuclear weaponry as "the currency of
diplomatic and political influence.
"RATHER THAN deciding we are
using, the wrong instrument (for
political influence), we decide we need
more-of the same instrument," Singer
said. "We try to get a lot more mileage
out of our military power. You end up
discovering you never have enough."
Singer's suggestions included selling
the Soviet Union "four or five American
Polaris systems to let .them know
there's absolutely no way we'll strike
first.
"The United States has to makean
absolutely unambiguous decision that
nuclear war is not winnable," he said.

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