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November 08, 1981 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Paae 8--Sundav: November 8. 1981-The Michiann Dnilv

ilhini no
(Continued from Page 1)
the Illinois 33 and returned it all the
way to the nine-yard line. Smith hit
tight endCraig Dunaway in the endzone
on the next play, knotting the score at
21-21.
"It all happened so fast," said
Needham of his interception. "I just
wish I could have returned it all the
way.'
AFTER ILLINOIS kicker Mike Bass
missed a 22-yard field goal attempt
which would have put his team back on
top, Michigan moved 38 yards in the
next four plays to the Illinois 42. Then
on a third-and-10, Smith scampered the
42 yards through the entire Illini defen-
se for his second ground score, moving
the Wolverines ahead, 28-21.
Schembechler called Smith's run the
turning point of the game. "That was
the play that did it for us," said Bo. "It
was beautiful."
The Wolverines came out after the in-
termission and could no wrong. After
stalling on its first possession,
Michigan scored every time it had the
ball in the second half. And after
surrendering 395 total yards to the Illini
in the first half, the Blue defense shut
down Eason and his receivers in the
second, allowing Illinois a mere 99 yar-
ds total offense.
IN ADDITION to Smith, who led all
rushers with 116 yards on the day,wide
receiver Anthony Carter also had an
outstanding afternoon. The speedy

longer '
junior hauled in six of Smith's throws
for 154 yards and two touchdowns,
making Illinois head coach Mike White
regret his decision to only affordCarter
one defender. His performance
yesterday boosted his career total to,
1,950 yards moving into first place on
the Michigan all-time list. Carter also
had a good day returning kicks, picking
up 62 yards on two punt returns and 82
yards on three kickoffs.
"They were going after the run, so I
was open a lot," said Carter. "Then
when they gave me double coverage,
we'd run it."
Fullback Stan Edwards picked up 71
yards and one touchdown, while
tailbacks Lawrence Ricks and fresh-
man Rick Rogers (picking up the first
score of his college career) also added a
TD each. Second-string quarterback B.
J. Dickey entered the game early in the

Fi hting
fourth quarter and completed two
passes, including a 6-yard toss to Tom
Hassel for the game's final score.
Despite the fact that Michigan hadn't
been so productive offensively since
1976, when Navy fell to the Wolverines,
70-14, White did not accuse Michigan of
running up the score. "Bo felt terrible
after the game and afterwards made it
a point to come up and tell me he felt
bad," said the second-year Illini coach.
"We deserve what we got. How can you
blame kids for playing hard?"
Schembechler, who has to prepare
his team for Purdue and Ohio State the
next two Saturdays, was quick to point
out that the score was deceiving. 0
"We're not as good as the score in-
dicated," said Bo. "And they're not as
bad. We can't start thinking that we're
a super power, because there ain't one
of them in the United States of
America."

,I

Daily Photo by MIKE LUCAS
WOLVERINE DEFENSIVE BACKS Jeff Reeves (43) and Jerry Burgei (15) break up a Tony Eason pass attempt to
Darrell Smith (22) in the second quarter of yesterday's game. After spotting Illinois 21 points in.the first quarter, the
Blue defense shut out the Illini offense for the final three quarters._

- .

Razo SRhEarp
By DREW SHARP

BloWout is deceiving ..
... Burgei lift s defense
A T FIRST GLANCE, Michigan's 70-21 throttling of Illinois may rekindle
fond memories of Wolverine blowouts of the past. In the days of the Big
Two, a Michiganromp by more than 40 points was as predictable as the
Wolverine offensive philosophy of "three yards and a cloud of dust."
Yesterday's final score gave no indication of how close the Illini came
from blowing the Wolverines right off their own Tartan Turf.
Two outstanding defensive plays by cornerback Jerry Burgei thwarted a
second period Illinois drive, which if successful, would have given the Illini a
28-7 advantage. A lead which would have been next to impossible for the
Wolverines to overcome.I
Illini signal-caller Tony Eason turned the Wolverine defense every which
way but loose with his pinpoint passing and clever mixing of plays in the first
period. Sensing the kill, Eason had his troops on the Michigan 25-yard line,
first down and 10. The junior quarterback dropped back into the pocket and
lofted a perfect pillow.pass to running back Darrell Smith in the end zone.
But before Smith could cradle the toss in his arms, Burge! drilled him in the
-back and the pass fell incomplete.
Treating it as only a nmomentary setback, Eason loaded up again and fired
a bullet, complete this time, to Smith at the Michigan 14 for another first
down. Going for it all again on the following play, Eason attempted to hit
running back Joe Curtis in the corner of the end zone. Burgei stepped in front
of him and picked off the pass, killing the Illini drive and resurrecting the
sieve-like Blue defense.
I just anticipated the play'
"He (Eason) was looking right at him (Curtis) so I knew that he was going
to him," said Burgei, who snatched two of Eason's aerials for the day. "Our
linebacker was all over him in a man for man defense, but he wasn't looking
at the pass so it could have dropped right in there for the score.. I just an-
ticipated the play. I'd like to think that it helped us get back into the game
and give us some momentum."
What it did was give the Michigan defense some reassurance that it could
stop Eason, the nation's fifth leading passer, when it had to.
"We were mixing up our coverage throughout the game," added Burgei.
We were trying to find the right combination. When Eason kept completing
those passes, it was a bad feeling. Usually, a team will drive on us, but we
would stop them from scoring when they got close. They've got a very ex-
plosive offense."
Not only explosive, but sophisticated-the type of offense to which
Michigan usually succumbs. But according to Burgei, there were no special
preparations in the week's practices to stop Eason, just some quick
reorganization at halftime.
"Practices went about the same. We weren't planning anything out of the
ordinary," said Burgei. "At halftime, we discussed what we had to do. I was
dropping back too deep in the beginning and Eason would dump the ball un-
derneath the coverage. We decided to change that. We were constantly con-
cerned with the deep threat. Eason is just a great quarterback and to beat
him, you're going to need your fair share of breaks."
The Wolverines got them by way of four Eason interceptions. ,
Eason became unravelled
"Going into halftime (with Michigan ahead, 28-21) I still had a good
feeling," said Illinois' second-year coach Mike White. "We were moving the
ball well throughout the first half, but we totally fell apart in the second
half."
Collapse would aptly describe the Illini's showing in the second half,
especially Eason. The junior college transfer passing whiz became
unravelled-missing open receivers with bounce passes which would give
shortstops fits.
"Coming in we were confident we could win," said Eason. "It just didn't
work out that way. Earlier, we ran a couple reverses which kept them off
balance. They never got their feet on the ground."
But when they did, the Wolverines pounded away to their biggest margin
of victory (49 points) since 1978 when they blanked Duke, 52-0.
Michigan coach Bo Schembechler, always the cautious one, refused to get
overly excited about his team's 70-point performance.
"We were fortunate we had a hot hand," said Schembechler. "We didn't
make a lot of mistakes and we didn't turn the ball over. We are still un-
predictable. We're not as good as the score indicates. We can't go on thinking
we are a super power because there isn't one in the country."
Unlike the days of the Big Two.

Can't get
MICH ILL
First downs................ 31 26
Rushing................... 373 108
Passing (comp/att/int) ....19/11/0 53/31/4
Passing Yards............. 272 386
Fumbles .................. 2/0 1/0
Punts....................4/44.8 6/47.3
SCORING PLAYS
ILL-Eason 3 yd. run (Bass kick)
MICH-Carter 60 yd. pass from Smith
(Haji-Sheikh kick)
ILL-Curtis 5 yd. run (Bass kick)
ILL-Smith 7 yd. pass from Eason (Bass kick)
MICH-Smith 1 yd. run (Ha ji-Sheikh kick)
MICH-Dunaway 9 yd. pass from Smith
(HajiSheikh kick)
MICH-Smith 42 yd. run (Haji-Sheikh kick)
MICH-Carter 12 yd. pass from Smith
(Ha ji.Sheikh kick)
MICH--Smith 14 yd. run (Haji-Sheikh kick)
MICH-Ricks 1 yd. run (Haji-Sheikh kick)
MICH-Edwards 7 yd. run (Haji-Sheikh kick)
MICH-Rogers 4 yd. run (Ha ji-Sheikh kick)
MICH-Hassel 6 yd. from Dickey (Haji-Sheikh kick)
PASSING
MICHIGAN
Att Comp Int Yds TD
Smith..............5 9 0 224 3
Dickey.............. 4 2 0 48 1:4
ILLINOIS
Att Comp Int Yds TD
Eason...............53 31 4 386 11
RUSHING
MICHIGAN Alt Yds Avg
S. Smith ........................ 15 116 7.7

enough
Edwards ........................1
W oolfolk ........................ !
Ricks ....... ................... !
Rogers .......................... 1
Dickey .......................... :
Hassel ..........................
Carter...........................
ILLINOIS
Curtis .................... ....
Eason.... .................
Wilson .......................
Sm ith ..........................
Thomas .......................
RECEIVING
MICHIGAN
Carter ... .....................
Bean ........................
Edwards.....................
Dunaway ........................
Brockington+ .....................
Hassel ..........................
ILLINOIS

12 71
9 57
8 51
8 49
2 11
3 9
1 9
Att Yds
6 36
8 17
3 24
3 16
3 15
Rec Yds
6 154
1 46
1 15
1 9
1 42
1 6

5.9
6.3
6.1
6.1
5.5
3.0
9.0
Avg
6.0
2.1
8.0
5.3
5.0
TD
2
0
0
1
0
1
TD
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Sm ith .. . .....................
Curtis ..... .............. ...
DeOliver ...... ............
Williams.....................
Wilson ..........................
Martin ..........................
Murphy......................
Passmore ..................
McAvoy .........................
Thomas .........................

Rec
7
7
4
4
3
2
2
1
1

Yds
78
48
48
62
33
.54
13
"8
6
5

Daily Photo by BRIAN MASCK
MICHIGAN QUARTERBACK STEVE Smith keeps the ball and turns up
field as Illingis defensive back Mike Heaven moves in for a tackle. Smith
keyed the Wolverine offense, accounting for six touchdowns (three running
and three passing) while rushing for 116 yards. In the air, Smith completed
nine passes for 224 yards.

0

Smith directs offensive explOsion
(Continued from Page 1)

and right into the outstretched hands of Anthony Car-
ter, who glided another 30 markers into the end zone.
His next two scoring plays, a one-yard plunge off
right tackle and a nine-yard pass to tight end Craig
Dunaway, brought the Wolverines back from a 21-7
deficit and seemed to take the heart out of Illinois' of-
fense and defense.
THEN, WITH 19 seconds remaining in the first
half, he stunned Illinois by sprinting 42 yards on a
quarterback draw up the middle of a wide open
defense.
Smith's perception was as much responsible for
those six points as his speed. "I changed plays," he
explained afterwards. I read something, and I

thought I could run up the middle, so I called a draw
play."
Another touchdown pass to Carter, this one a 12-
yarder, and a 14-yard scamper, which broke the
game open in the third period, earned Smith a fourth
quarter rest.
MICHIGAN COACH Bo Schembechler was equally
pleased with his signal-caller. "This is what we hoped
would happen to him," Bo said. "He's a better runner
than (Rick) Leach-on the basis of speed. Rick'll
admit that. I even told him (Leach) that."
It is not coincidence that Smith's output has risen
during the last two weeks in proportion to that of the

dazzling Number '1.'
Last weekend in Minneapolis,;Carter snagged eight
receptions for 154 yards in the 34-13 win over the
Gophers, and he was equally productive yesterday.
He finished with six catches for 154 yards and two
touchdowns, and he also returned two punts for 64
markers and three kickoffs for another 82.
"Steve picked up the blitzes, and he hit me on the
breaks," the soft-spoken Carter explained. "I had a
lot of confidence in Steve even after we lost to
Wisconsin. He's a great quarterback, and right now
he's coming into his own. I'm just glad he's, on my

a

team." v

i

,,..

BUCKEYES DROP OUT OF FIRST:

_._. .,+......r:{tiX. '....r ........s .............r..........:-.'! : :"Yt;{,v:.t.:t:.tii::.,S"..'X_::::. n.; w'itn:. u.....v.

Gophers buek Ohio Ste,35-31

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - Mike
Hohensee passed for five touchdowns
and 444 yards, including a 28-yard
game-winner to Jay Carol with 2.38 to
play, as Minnesota upset Ohio State 35-
31 yesterday to knock the Buckeyes out
of first place in the Big Ten.
Hohensee, a 6-foot-1 190-pound junior

college transfer, completed 37 of 67
passes and rallied the Gophers from a
21-7 halftime deficit.
Carroll, a tight end, caught the win-
ning pass in the end zone after Buckeye
cornerback Kevin Bell deflected the
ball. That erased a 31-28 Ohio State
lead and gave Minnesota its only lead of
the game.

Wisconsin 28, Indiana 7
BLOOMINGTON (AP)- Wisconsinr's
defense throttled Indiana nearly the en-
tire game yesterday, while quarter-,
back Jess Cole ran for one touchdown
and passed for two others to lift the
Badgers to a 28-7 Big Ten football vic-
tory.
Cole completed only five of 13 pass at-
tempts, but one of them, a 30-yarder to
Marvin Neal, set up his own touchdown,
run. Then he lofted a 56-yard touchdown
pass to Michael Jones early in the four-
th quarter to put the game out of reach..
THE BADGER defense, meanwhile,
intercepted four Indiana passes and
kept the Hoosiers in their own territory
nearly the whole game.
The victory put the Badgers- into a
two-way tie for first place in the Big
Ten at 5-2 with Michigan.
Iowa 33, Purdue 7
IOWA CITY (AP)- Quarterback
Gordy Bohannon ran for two touch:
downs and Tom Nichol kicked a pair of
field goals as Iowa, ending 20 years of
frustration, swept past Purdue 33-7
yesterday in Big Ten Conference foot-
ball.
The victory secured Iowa's first win-
ning season since 1961 and broke a 20-
game losing streak to Purdue. No other
major school in the country had gone
longer without finishing .500.
Michigan State 61,
Northwestern 14

Celts stall'
Pistons,4
By JIM DWORMAN
and LARRY FREED
Special to the Daily
PONTIAC-They were overmatched,
outplayed and outclassed. The Detroit
Pistons continued a descent to earth
with a 129-88 loss to the defending world
champion Boston Celtics.
"The people in the green shirts came
in here tonight and taught us a lesson,"
said Piston coach Scotty Robertson.
"Our guys have a lot to learn."
AFTER- A sloppily played first quar-
ter, in which the Pistons only trailed by
eight, 35-27, the Celtics reeled off 13
unanswered points midway through the
second stanza and opened up a 21 point
halftime margin.
Boston removed all doubt about the
game's outcome when they tallied 10
straight points late in the third quarter
to take a 94-58 lead.
Nate Archibald led the onslaught with
a torrid 12 for 14 performance from the
field as he led all scorers with 24 points.
Cedric Maxwell added 22 along with a
game high 11 rebounds.
DESPITE A team-high 21 points,
Isiah Thomas was outplayed by Ar-
chibald. "They played harder than wer

Mal

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