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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 08, 1981 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-THE

PUZZLE

Yal

The Michigan Daily-
e rec

I

By Don Rubin
The following hate mail just
came in from Queen Mataaho,
who was nice enough to
enclose the following clues as
to where on earth she was
coming from:
175°14'
21*10'
We'd like her return address
(to the nearest population
center).
Last week's answer:
Key -1600 fit the lock.
The following people answered
last week 's puzzle correctly:
Kevin Whitted
Andrew Jacobsen
Edward Masck
Marius Dulcamara
Dan McCord
Leslie Ann Stead
Doug Dougherty
Susan Weidenthal
David Petrella
Steve Collins
Adrian Wyllie
Olga Szamuaj
Therera Sigillito
Thomas Hitchman
Send your completed puzzle to the
Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109 by Wednesday of next
week. One person will be selected at
Random from the correct entries to win
a free Michigan Daily T-shirt.
Fed up with these crazy puzzles?
Would you like to get even with Don
Rubin and win $10 to boot? Then
send your original ideas for The
Puzzle to The Michigan Daily, 420
Maynard St., Ann Arbor, 48109.
All entries will become the property
of United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
(You only win the big bucks if we
use your puzzle idea.)

I!

_ _ _

Iz

Iz

'I!

bud get s
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP)- After 15
years of operating deficits, Yale
University yesterday revealed it had
balanced its budget during the 1981
fiscal year and achieved a $52,000 sur-
plus.
The university's books were balanced
"without adversely affecting the
academic programs or the nature of the
university," finance and ad-
ministration Vice President Jerald
Stevens said.
"ALL MEMBERS of the community
have been part of the efforts to
strengthen Yale financially while
retaining academic excellence,"
Stevens said in a report to the president
and fellows of Yale.
Stevens said the balanced budget was
important because Yale has suffered
operating deficits every year since
1965.
"The transition from operating
deficits to a break-even level required

-Sunday, November 8, 1981-Page 5
iords
several years of planning ani
budgeting effort, and we achieved oui
objective as planned," Stevens said.
IN 1977, the Yale University Corp
called for a balanced operating budge
by 1980-81. University officials said i
balanced budget also is projected fo
the current fiscal year.
According to the report, Yale's en
dowment reached a new high of $79
million during the fiscal year endini
June 30, 1981, and its return on invesi
ment improved significantly, to 22.
percent. The endowment produced
return in dividends, interest and rents
income of more than $50 million.

-
rA

N'.

AS ' . V
f i *

4

MON. TUE. THUR, FRI, 7:00-9:15
THEf ADVENTURE
C " 0e eN T IN UE 5 R E
GENE HACKMANf
CHRISTOPHER REEVE-
NED BEATTY
JACKIE COOPER
upAN
S o®
When they met the),
heard tells. And that
wa justo~ "ow,''l!one,
low, BI I I. 'rHI &
B AIR BROWN
CONTINENTALa
DIVIDE
SA UNIVERSAL
PIC T IRE
MON, TUE, THUR, 7:00-9:15
SUN, WED,
1-3-5-7-9:1S

From a place you
never heard of...
A story you'll
never forget.
A Peter Weir Film
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
ALBERT FINNEY IF LOOKS
JAMES COBURN COULD
SUSAN DEY
KILL...
IM IIERO

MON, TUE, THUR, 7:15-9:15
SUN, WED,
1: 00-3 :00-5:00-7 :15.9.:15

(5)
Ho-

43

MON. TUE, THUR, 7:10-9:25
SUN, WED,
1:10-3:10-5:10-7:10-9:25

:1

lb . V-% --

@J 1981 United Feature Syndicate. Inc.

RogeJones

(Upper Level)
MON, TUE. THUR 8:30 ONLY
SUN, WED
I1:00-4:00-8:30

(Upper Level)A
MON, TUE, THUR. 7:15-9:20
SUN, WED,
1:15-3:155:15-7:15-9:20
It's the land of hospitality...
unless you don't belong there.
Keith Carradine
~~ Powers, Boothe
SOUTHIERNI
IGOMFORT_.

'U' life hard for foreign students

John T. Scopes, a science teacher in
Dayton,. Ohio, gained worldwide atten-
tion after being found guilty in 1925 of
teaching the theory of evolution in con-
travention of state law. The presiding
judge prevented any debate on the con-
stitutionality of the laws

(Continued from Page 1)
the resulting large student-teacher
ratio requires her to be "over-
aggressive in order to meet a teacher."
LANGUAGE differences present very
real communication problems for
foreign students. Hanisup Kown, for
example, said, he found his language
problems got in the way whenever he
was talking to an American student.
Kown said he could "just answer
questions, often by yes or no, and was
very passive especially in the begin-
ning."
Anothe student, Dimitris Zadelia, a
Greek researcher at the Health Clinic,
said, "Even if international students
are capable of expressing themselves
inEnglish, they sometimes find it hard
to pick up some words from Americans
with regional accents."
To grapple with these difficulties,
foreign students often turn to ethnic or
international clubs, or the the Univer-
sity's International Center, for help.
HOWEVER, because of the constan-
tly increasing numbers of foreign
students at the University, the Inter-
national Center finds its staff strapped
for time trying to help students with
their individual problems.
"Fifty years ago, a foreign student
coming to Ann Arbor for the first time
was treated as a very special guest.
The ladies would serve tea to the new
Chinese or African student (who in-
cidentally would be the only Chinese of
African student on campus) in their
long gowns," explained International,
Center Director Jon Heise. "Today, if a
student comes up to me and says he is
Chinese or African, I have to ask for his
indentification number." A counselor
at the center, Ellen Kolovos, concurred,
"Our most serious limitation is the
numbers with which we are dealing."
Heise added, however, that foreign

students usually only consult Univer-
sity counselors with their problems as a
"last resort." As a result, he said, most
of the problems the center deals with
are administrative and only about 2
percent of the problems it addresses'
are of a personal nature.
INTERNATIONAL students also of-
ten turn to each other when they arrive
in the United States, Heise sadi.
Peter Dolan, an American foreign
languages major, said he notices how
Chinese students often group together
in South Quad. Marian Thompson, who
lives in Baits housing on North Campus,
said she has seen how Spanish-speaking
students often eat together in groups in
the Bursley Hall cafeteria.
Foreign students meet casually at
cafeterias or libraries, but they also
meet formally in the many ethnic
student societies on campus. There are
about 40 such clubs at the University,
ranging from the Muslim Club, to the
Ukranian Club.
These groups' main function, accor-
ding to a number of the club presidents,
is to pass on "social knowledge" about
American culture from seniors to
newcomers. This knowledge may
regard administrative details, such as
Poetry Reading
with
Marilyn Churchill
ond
Sue Budin
Monday, Nov. 9 - 8 p.m.
-ADMISSION FREE
GUILD HOUSE - 802 Monroe
X62-5189

University registration or housing
rules. But it also includes what may
more broadly be called "social advise."
Senior international students help new
students learn American customs and
habits so that the new students don't
need to learn the same lessons first-
hand.

--

You are cordially invited to attend the

nel

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