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November 06, 1981 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-11-06

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Page 10-Friday, November 6, 1981-The Michigan Daily
The weekly DAILY line

Counting and Non-Counting Techniques for winning Blackjack
Play.

Three of the Daily's senior football "experts" held
an emergency meeting earlier this week behind
closed doors. Mark Mihanovic, Greg DeGulis, and
Drew Sharp met with just one objective in mind-
putting a stop to fellow editor Buddy Moorehouse.
Over the last three weeks, Moorehouse has com-
piled a record of 25-5 to jump out to a three-game ad-
vantage over his closest competitor, DeGulis.
"MARK, THE guy is dangerous," begged DeGulis.
"He's got to be shut down, and right now-before it's

too late. He's got to be stopped."
"Let's shoot him," interjected Sharp.
"I was thinking of something a little more subtle,"
said Mihanovic, puffing on a cigar. "I've already
threatened him with the midget frisbee beat and a
one-way ticket to Escanaba, but he's still winning."
"LET'S SHOOT him," said Sharp.
"That pudgy round-headed kid has been a thorn in
our side since we started these selections," said
DeGulis. "Let's cork him permanently."

"I was thinking more in the line of thumbscrews,"
said Mihanovic.
"Shoot him!" screamed Sharp.
The debate rages on, as Moorehouse and special
guest prognosticator Don Else, provide the challenge
for the other three enraged editors. But one thing is
certain; if Moorehouse values his existence, he will
see to it that a 5-5 record appears by his name next
week.

0
6

On fire:

Eason puts winning stamp
on Illinois aerial attack

--- - -m -m -- oo m ---- - - o ==' m
1 SHOW STARTS:
1AT 9:30
AIIO
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H Schoollcids
1 ~Mave Waves
For more info: 996-1843' Record & Tape Exc.
uL -..--- --- --- -o- - . -o-

replacement, the man who was not cer-
tain from week to week during the fall
of 1980 whether or not the courts would
pull Wilson off the field and put him on
it, is setting Champaign, Illinois on fire.
Tony Eason (don't be-silly, of course-
he's a junior college transfer) is
playing coach Mike White's free-
wheeling offensive philosophy to the
hilt, averaging 291 yards per game
through the air. And the Illini, who
finished 3-5 in the Big Ten behind a
zillion yards of Wilson passing last
season, enter Michigan Stadium
tomorrow at 4-2 (5-3 overall) and one-
half game from the top.
The major question entering the 1981
season was whether a quarterback who
did not throw much in high school or at
American River Junior College in
California could adapt to the put-it-up-
and-keep-it-up attack coached by
White.
Eason adapted. He has thrown for
more than 300 yards five times thus far,
prompting White to flatly state, 'Tony
Eason is an All-American."
EASON IS NOT about to, boast,
however, that he knew it all along.
"Coming into the season, I didn't really
look ahead to where I'd be right now,"
he said. "I just wanted to contribute to
the team. This offense is a good offense
to play quarterback on."
Indeed, the wide receiver combo of
Mike Martin and Oliver Williams (55
catches, 1074 yards, and 10 touch-
downs) is an attractive pair totwork
with. But there's no doubt that the big
weapon for the Illini is the right arm
wh' h has uncorked 72 straight passes
without interception in its last two
outings.-
"Tony has just had a great year,"
White said. "He's done all the things
that we've asked of him. He's throwing
a variety of passes, and he's thrown for
a better completion percentage than
Wilson. We've centered the offense on
him like we did on Dave."
THE KEY TO obtaining Eason's ser-
vices was one of the California connec-

tions which White developed as head
coach at Cal and offensive coordinator
at Stanford.
"I never saw a film on him," White
said. "He was recommended by one of
my ex-assistants out in California, Al
Saunders. He had seen him throw the
ball, and he told me I'd better take
him."
Eason is just as grateful to Saunders
as White must be. The junior physical
education major said that his biggest
asset as a quarterback is "being un-
I~ \
Eason
... sparks Illini offense
der Coach White. He's very intelligent,
and he takes advantage of certain
situations quite well. We don't like to
audibilize. 0
"We're happy. We've done well in
couple of games and badly in a couole
of others, but everybody's gaining con=
fidence," Eason continued. "We've im-
proved defensively as well as offer-
sively, and when we win, it's a team
victory."
For the Illini to secure a "team vic-
tory" over Michigan, they will need an
outstanding individual performance by
Eason. But it will have to be the type
that wins games, not the kind of day
that the aforementioned Wilson had last
year in Ann Arbor, when he threw for
318 futile yards as his squad lost, 45-14.

MR.FLOOD'S _0
k. PARTY -
- HUNTO"& SAFETl 'T I 2
NEVER IJNT A LOP4G
SUNDAY MO}NDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY TNURSDAY FRIPAY SATUJRDAY
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