100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 06, 1981 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


The Michigan Daily-Friday, November 6, 1981-Page 5
At least it's still beer

WASHINGTON (AP) - If the bottle
says beer, you can be sure it's beer, but
the brewer doesn't have to tell you what
else it might be, the Treasury Depar-
tment ruled yesterday.
Department officials, mindful of
President Reagan's orders to cut "un-
necessary" federal regulation, killed
the Treasury's own proposal that would
have required beer and wine makers to
list ingredients on bottle labels - or at
least tell consumers where to write for
a list.
THE PROPOSED rule had been ap-
proved last year during the Carter ad-
ministration to "allow consumers to
make informed choices about alcoholic
beverages, including the option to forgo
ingredients they may not wish to con-
sume."
The new action was a victory for the
industry, which had fought the rule that
was to have taken effect Jan. 1, 1983.
It was a defeat, though an expected
one, for consumer groups which had
argued that beer and wine buyers had a
right to know what they were drinking,
particularly in regard to chemical ad-
ditives. One group indicated it might go
to court to try to keep the issue alive.

TO REAGAN administration
Treasury officials, it was a matter of
dollars and cents, according to a
statement released by Assistant
Secretary John Walker.
"Based on the information available
to us, which is fairly extensive, we are
unable to conclude that the benefits to
consumers of ingredient labeling for
alcoholic beverages outweight the costs
that would be passed on to them as a
result of the labeling requirement,"
Walker said.,
"It is simply a case where the costs
are relatively clear and easy to
calculate, whereas the benefits are
speculative."
HOWEVER, NEITHER Walker's
statement nor the accompanying for-
mal regulations gave a Treasury

estimate of such costs. And other
Treasury officials were not able to
come up with an estimate quickly.
Letters to Treasury from U.S. Senate
and House members ih California - rich
wine-making country - had estimated
consumers would have ended up paying
at least $90 million more a year if the
rule had stuck.
The new order says the Food and'
Drug Administration already approves
ingredients in beer and wine. And it
says current Treasury regulations - en-
forced by the Bureau of Alcohol,;
Tobacco and Firearms - "are sufficient
to protect the consumer and ensure
product integrity through the
establishment of standards of in-
tegrity."

Charlie explains baby
Prince Charles of Wales, left, speaks at a luncheon in London's Guildhall yesterday, just hours after Buckingham
Palace announced that he and the Princess of Wales (Lady Di), right, are expecting a royal baby in June 1982. Sir
Ronald Gardener Thorpe,Iord Mayor of London, sits at center.

400 arrested in disco drug raid,

From AP and UPI
NEW YORK- More than 400 bleary-eyed young
people inched through a criminal processing line at
police headquarters yesterday after their arrests in a
mammoth drug raid on a Manhattan disco.
"They had all kinds of narcotics," said deputy
police inspector Joseph Vincent. "Drugs, smoke and
coke, anything you wanted."
OFFICERS RAIDED the Gotham Disco late Wed-
nesday after undercover agents made eight to 10 pur-
chases of marijuana, cocaine and mescaline.
Police used five vans and spent more than two
hours ferrying those arrested to a ,nearby precinct
stationhouse.
,Lt. John Brennan of the -Narcotics Bureau said 281
males and 138 females were arrested. Most were 16 to

20 years old, but Brennan said about six of the girls
were under the age of 16.
TEN WERE CHARGED with selling narcotics,
which carries penalties of up to one year in jail. The
rest were given summonses for loitering, a
misdemeanor that carries a $25 fine.
As they waited to be processed yesterday, most of
those arrested were unrepentant and many com-
plained about the raid.
"Man, there's crime on the streets and the cops
ain't got nothing better to do than bust us," said one
youth wearing torn dungarees, sweatshirt and
unlaced sneakers.
A GIRL WITH hair tinted light green said: "I'm
more afraid of going home to my mother than I am
about this summons. It's a joke and the judge is going

to let us go."
One young man told a reporter, "We were just pop-
ping pills and doing our thing when the cops came in
like gangbusters."
When police entered the disco on East 54th Street at
11:45 p.m. Wednesday, said Lt. Austin Kelly, the
youngsters tried to rid themselves of incriminating
evidence.
"THEY JUST stood there while the officers took
control of the place," he said. "Then everything star-
ted dropping-pills, marijuana, heroin."
Some of the celebrants didn't realize the party was
over and did chorus line kicks as police led them han-
dcuffed from the Gotham Discotheque to waiting
police vans.

04nnouncing Marty
Seventh Annual
O SALE
ciB 10 V3 ONSV#
saute
.r O' $SAVE
$ 4
- NIX 100
Everybody saves 10% to 100% on Marty's Name Brand Merchandise
Daks of London Anthony Allan Deans Pendleton Pappogollo Accessories
Austin Reed Sero Broemor London Fog J.G. Hook
Corbin Ltd. - Byford Kenneth Gordon Pappagallo Shoes David Brooks
Here's how it works:
Just make a selecion of any quantiy of, items, ranging from suits to socks.
clothing. Before paying for your purchase, pick The sale ends- November 14. so come in.
out1one of our celebration balloons. lvery soon..Joinourcelebration and pick your
balloon contains a discount slip worth 10"to, balloon for great savings.
l57,201,301, 50414ir even IX)"o/off'lor tour convenience, Marty's is open
the price of your purchase. In addition to the Thursday and Friday evenings until :30 ,iiind
discount slips, some balloons also contain '"wild we validate parking from the Mayntard Street
card' gifts that entiile you to copletely free carport
Everythi For The Man
APPAREL FOR WOMEN
306-31. STATE ST ' ANN ARBOR

Italians urge precautions

ROME (AP) - The Italian gover-
ninent is calling on foreign diplomats to
tighten security and suggesting they
2arry guns, officials from several em-
bassies reported yesterday.
Foreign Ministry officials confirmed
that a circular letter was mailed to all
diplomatic missions in Rome, calling
their attention to a series of security
measures Italian azthotftie's' have
suggested previously.
THE DEVELOPMENT came three
weeks after published reports said

,Libya has sent gunmen to kill several
U.S. ambassadors in Europe, including
Maxwell Rabb in Rome.
The reports said Libyan leader
Moammar Khadafy ordered such
attacks in reprisal for the downing of
two Libyan jets by U.S. planes over the
disputed Gulf of Sidra off the Libyan
coast Aug. 19.
U.S. and Italian officials declined to
discuss' the reports. Libya also has not
responded to the charges, according to
the Rome office of the official Libyan

news agency, JANA.
Libyan Radio on Wednesday claimed
the United States was planning to
assassinate Khadafy next week during
U.S.-Egyptian-Sudanese military
maneuvers near Libya's border.
The Italian suggestions included
tightening of public access to embassy
compounds, sealing of gardens and
courtyards and installing reinforced
doors, closed-circuit TV monitors and
direct telephone lines to nearby police
stations.

.
f'
T
1I

Sweden suspects nuclear arms

(Continued from Page 1)
the presence of U-235 could not be
proved because the Soviets would not
allow an onboard inspection of the hold.
One defense official said a "certain
suspicion" had prompted a check of one
torpedo tube that yielded the U-238. The
disclosure came a day after Sweden
said it had been testing a secret anti-
submarine torpedo when the gray
Aiuisian craft ran aground with a crew
of , just 11 miles from the testing site
inithe restricted llekinge Archipelao.
NiLS GYLDEN, a nuclear arms ex-
per on the Swedish defense staff, said
it 'appeared that the Soviet sub was
car'ying nuclear-tipped torpedos, a

secret superpower weapon about which
little is known, but he could not under-
stand why.
"Incredible. I can't understand why
they would be so stupid as to enter
Swedish inner waters with nuclear
charges aboard. The only reason I can
see is their system does not function
yet," Gylden said.
. He said there probably were other
types of uranium aboard the sub than
the U-238 mentioned by Falldin. "There
would have to be Uranium 235 or
plutonium too, but it was probably hard
to find out by the radiation
measurement," he explained, adding
there probably was no risk of acciden-

tal explosion aboard the storm-rocked
sub.
The defense staff, expert said the
nuclear arms aboard the Whiskey class
sub, built in' the mid-50s but modified,
most likely were to be used for fighting
large surface vessels like carriers.

m

m .' 1,

a, s
'Aj4

"
a ,.
r..
<, '
i,

OPEN MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, AND SATURDAY, 9:30 A.M. UNTIL 5:30 P.M.
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY, 9:30 A.M. UNTIL 9:00 P.M.
THE CLASSIC PEA COAT FOR MISS J. $59
Versatile and cozy coat to wear atop everything that's new this
season...particularly knickers or split skirts. Double-breasted
style, notch collar. Of navy wool/nylon plush, sizes 5 to 13.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan