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November 03, 1981 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Page 8-Tuesday, November 3, 1981-The Michigan Daily
1.

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University
establishes
exchange
program
with China
(Continued from Page 17
China is emerging onto the world
scene faster than many people realize,
Oksenberg said. China has become the
world's third largest energy consumer
and fourth largest producer. It has the
third largest defense budget and the
fourth largest metallurgy industry. In
addition, the United States has become
China's third largest trading partner
after Japan and Hong Kong.
"ANYONE WHO wants to under-
stand our era must take into account
the' Chinese experience," Oksenberg
said, explaining that China has been
closed to the West for approximately 30
years. "In many scientific and
humanistic areas, China is virtually
unmapped," he said.
The University has a long relation-
ship with China. Before the communist
takeover in 1949 the University was
second among U.S. universities in the
number of Ph.D.s bestowed on Chinese
scholars, Oksenberg noted.
Consequently many of the Univer-
sity's alumni hold prestigious positions
in the People's Republic. The head of
the Chinese Academy of Medical Scien-
ces and top officials in various
engineering fields are University
graduates, Oksenberg said.
THE UNIVERSITY'S current ex-
change program with China is distin-
ctive from other schools such as Min-
nesota, John Hopkins, Stanford, and
Berkeley, because the University's ap-
proach focuses on opening up quality
research projects, and does not extend
to undergraduates at this time, Oksen-
berg said.
University faculty and graduate
students desiring more details on the
exchange program should contact
Associate Dean Donald Deskins at
Rackham, Oksenberg said.

6
6

Daily Photo by DEBORAH LEWIS
POLITICAL SCIENCE PROF. Michel Oksenberg discusses an upcoming
exchange program between scholars from the University and the People's
Republic of China. A special China task force, of which Oksenberg is chair-
man, will soon release details of the exchange through the Rackham
Graduate School.
Many Chinese scholars
,here at 'U'already

6
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(Continued from Page 1)
research associate at the Center for
Chinese Studies.
But Oksenberg said, that high
Chinese government officials, including
Minister of Education Jiang Nanxiang,
have indicated they would like td in-
crease social science research in the
United States. China already has
scholars enrolled in law, business, and
economics at the University.
"THEY'RE very interested in lear-
ning business management courses,"
Oksenberg said.
The current drive in Cina, according
to Luo, is "To learn new technology
from the western world to improve our
modernization."
"But our modernization cannot be a
copy of western modernization," the
Chinese professor said, explaining that
China is a large country with a unique
culture and socialist system.
ABOUT THE recent exchange
program established between the
University and China, Luo said U.S.
scholars must realize China is only a
developing country and they should not
"j ook at China from only the American
point of view."
Some U.S. scholars complain about
the research conditions in China and
state the exchange is not based on
reciprocity, he said. Luo contends this
view is shortsighted because it is dif-
ficult to equate the two countries item
per item.

THE GREATEST difficulty for
Chinese scholars, doing research here is
the langufage, noting rarely are inter-
preters provided in the United States,
he said. This problem may 'be
alleviated in the future, because
English has replaced Russian as the
primary second language taught in
China, Luo said.
Luo, who has been doing research
here for more than a year, said he
wishes to visit farms and factories -
not only museums and universities - so
he can write his book about American
scoiety. But he said he has not been
able to visit many of them.
Luo will be returning to China this
January. He said "My task is not com-
pleted very well; to understand such a
huge country is a difficult task."

D

Sweden
questions

0

Soviet
skipper
STOCKHOLM, Sweden AP - The
Soviet Union allowed the commander of
a submarine stranded deep inside
Swedish waters to be questioned
yesterday and Swedish tugboats
refloated the sub to prevent bad
weather from battering the vessel.
Sweden at first insisted that a
satisfactory explanation for the sub's
presence in restricted Swedish waters
would be required before it could be
taken off the rocks close to the
Karlskrona naval base where it ran
aground last Tuesday. The Swedes said
the sub was equipped as a spy ship.
SOVIET AMBASSADOR Mikhail
Yakovlev earlier in the day told the
Foreign Ministry that his government
had approved interrogation of the skip-
per, paving the way for a solution to the
nearly week-long impasse.
But while the sub's skipper was being
questioned aboard a Swedish naval
vessel, its assistant commander sent
distress signals to naval headquarters
at Karlskrona.

'up;

rm

i T

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GRE PSYCH - GRE BIO - MAT
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