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October 30, 1981 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Office of Financial Aid, 2011 Student Activities Building announces:
G S L
PRIORITY DEADLINE
The priority processing deadline for Guaranteed Student
Loans for FalI/Winter or Winter Only* is
OCTOBER 30v 1981
Complete processing and fund disbursement cannot be as-
sured for applications received in the Office after this date.
* Last term of the loan period is Winter Term 1982.

Page 8-Friday, October 30, 1981-The Michigan Daily'
Anirmal.,House

Students turn college food

C.K. SPURLOCK AND
PMeENT
KENNY
ROGERS
L DVWTIE

I

MURFREESBORO, N.C. (AP)- The mayor
yesterday lifted a state of emergency that was im-
posed when a food fight at a college cafeteria
escalated into a riot as students threw furniture as
well as dinner.
Ten students were arrested on felony charges of in-
citing a riot after the incident at Chowan College in
this northeastern North Carolina town Wednesday,
Police Chief Robert Harris said.
PHIL ROYCE, a Chowan spokesman, said the
ringleaders of the food fight would be disciplined,
with penalties ranging from work details to suspen-
sion.
The food fight broke out when about 600 students
started hurling turkey, apples, mashed potatoes and
bananas during a Halloween dinner.,
"Food was all over the ceiling," police officer

Tommy Geesaid. "The floor was such a mess you
couldn't walk on it. It was a total wreck."
POLICE SAID the food fight turned into a riot when
students started throwing plates and chairs.
"It was funny for a while, but it got too funny," said
Mayor W.W. Hill, who declared a state of emergency
and banned sales of alcohol for 12 hours in the town of
3,500.
Harris said the emergency declaration was needed
to ban alcohol sales.
THE STATE of emergency was lifted yesterday
morning, but police said it would be reimposed if
there were signs of trouble.
Estimates of damage to the cafeteria ranged from
$2,000 to $3,000.
Harris, who entered the cafeteria with three other
officers, said he found "students just screaming and
hollering, throwing food and trays, breaking up fur-
niture-they broke the door open, too."

t Mto riot
HE SAID police used dogs to break up the crowd
and ordered students back to their dormitories.
Chowan College's enrollment is 1,100.
After the fight broke out, college officials locked
the doors in an effort to calm the crowd; police said.
Some students panicked when they could not escape
and broke down the doors.
"I locked the doors because I thought when they
realized the doors were closed they would stop," said'
assistant cafeteria manager Larry Lassiter. "But it
got worse, so I opened the doors."
NO SERIOUS injuries were reported.
Students said the idea was born Wednesday after-
noon at a local tavern where a crowd gathered to
drink beer. They said someone stood up and announ-
ced plans for a food fight at the Halloween dinner.""
Harris said the students facing charges would ap-
pear in court Tuesday. Eight of them remained in the
Hertford County Jail on $2,000 bond, police said.

WEST &.

rE
GALLAGHER
KING of THE SLDG-o-guATIC

. %.J"L-j I j 11 %A%

Columbia crew
readies shuttle
for second flight

'IN THE ROUND

,"^

NEXT SUNDAY-NOV. 8-7:30 P.M.
CRISLER ARENA
Tickets are $15.00 and $12.50 and are available at the Michigan Union
Ticket Office, Hudson's and CTC outlets. For mail order, send stamped, self-
addressed envelope with acertified check or money order to Kenny Rogers
Major Events, 530 South State, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. Good seats still
available! A MAJOR EVENTS PRESENTATION
Peofal-Managem Ken Kragen

AN
EVENING
WITH

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.
(AP)-Columbia's launchpad was
cleared yesterday of all but essential
workers as technicians installed ex-
plosive devices before starting the five-
day countdown for the space shuttles's
second flight.
The day long installation of ex-
plosives on the launchpad began at
12:30 a.m. It included explosive
charges to sever bolts to release
spaceship at the moment of launch and
charges which the range safety officer
would detonate by radio signal to tear
the vehicle apart in case it drifted off
course toward a populated area.
TODAY'S LAUNCHPAD schedule
calls primarily for close-out work in
preparation for starting the coun-
tdown. The main goal of the flight is to
prove that Columbia, which made a
highly successful flight debut last April,
can fly again.
The countdown is to start at 1 a.m.
EST Saturday, aimipg for a 7:30 a.m.
Wednesday liftoff of the first spaceship
ever ticketed for a return trip to orbit.
The men who will fly the mission,
astronauts Joe Engle and Richard
Truly, were busy yesterday in a shuttle.
simulator at the Johnson Space Center'
in Houston.

ASKED HOW the astronauts felt
about the upcoming flight, the first
space mission for both, space agency
spokesman John Lawrence said:
"They're really high, animated, ex-
cited and enthusiastic. They can hardly
wait."
Engle and Truly spent the morning
practicing different types of launch
aborts and shifted in the afternoon to
reentry and landing maneuvers. Today,
the astronauts will fly to Edwards Air
Force Base, Calif., to practice landing
approaches in a Gulfstream II jet
plane outfitted to handle like the shut-
tle.
Columbia once again is to land on the
large Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards at
the end of the planned five-day mission.
The National Aeronautics and Space
Administration hopes to gain enough
experience and confidence at Edwards
to begin returning the shuttle to a
15,000-foot Cape Canaveral landing
strip by the fourth and final test flight in
the shuttle program.
THE ASTRONAUTS could escape by
triggering ejection seats if range
safety action became necessary.
NASA hopes that Columbia and
future shuttles each will be capable of
100 roundtrips into space.

.;,

CHUCK
MANGIONE

N

NOVEMBER 18
Hill Auditorium
in Ann Arbor -8 P.M.
Tickets are $9.50, $8.50 and $7.50 and are
on sale at the Michigan Union Ticket Of-
fice, Hudson's and CTC outlets.

TAKE OFF ON A
CAREER AS A
NAVY PILOT
Be part of the Navy aviation team-a Navy pilot. As a Navy pilot,
you'll fly some of the most sophisticated aircraft in the world. You'll
gain early responsibility thanks to advanced technical training. And
you'll have the chance for world wide travel.
QUALIFICATIONS: Minimum BA/Bs degree (summer graduates
may inquire). Applicants must pass aptitude and physical
examinations and qualify for security clearance. U.S. citizenship
required.
BENEFITS: Excellent package includes 30 days' earned annual
vacation. Medical/dental/low cost life insurance coverage and other
tax-free incentives. Dependents' benefits available. Promotion
programs included.
PROCEDURES: Call Navy Management Personnel Office at: 1-800-
482-5140.

(Continued from Page 1)
Arabia's ambassador to the United
States, was cautious in linking the sale
to the removal of specific obstacles
blocking the road to peace. "We are
buying these planes to defend our coun-
try," he said yesterday.
Asked if his country is prepared to
join the Camp David peace process, the

ambassador suggested the burden of
paving the way to peace rests with
Israel.
IN MOWCOW, the official Soviest
news agency Tass said the AWACS sale
fits "into Washington's longterm policy
of increasing supplies of American
weapons to this already explosive,
region. All this pursues the goal of
preparing for armed U.S. intervention
in the case of a 'need' for a direct
seizure of the oilfields."
Paris' liberal Le Monde newspaper
observed, "...It would serve nothing to
deploy the quasi-Herculean efforts to
get the Senate to swallow the sale of the
AWACS if it was to returnl to the
diplomatic apathy that until now has
characterized the American attitude in
the Israeli-Arab conflict."
Le Monde noted the planes would not
be delivered until 1985, "which leaves
plenty of time to see if Saudi Arabia
separates itself from the 'moderation'
with which it is credited today."
The French government, like other
U.S. allies in Western Europe, issued no
official reaction.

AP Photo
MEMBERS OF AN underwater expedition team go through mock exercises
in preparation for the Nov. 4 flight of the Space Shuttle.
AWACS sale draws
mixed reaction abroad

A MAJOR EVENTS PRESENTATION

I

Id

0

L

j

NOVEMBER 4-HILL AUDITORIUM

The next time you
pick up your car keys and
head for the door, ask
yourself whether a phone
call could save you the
trip-and the wasted

AW

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