100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 30, 1981 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 6-Friday, October 30, 1981--The Michigan Daily
Prism and WABX present
.811 0010,
S.
I TI C K ES0N A E OWa e
,.,Mo . .. ....e... .. . .,A,.. u s1
, y5 o
CAI1 EaOaE
Ipe
!ItC1;
IMICHIGAN THEATRE
TIKT ON SNW
I T4C KETS S7.50 RESERVED tAVAILABLE AT SCHOOLKIDS' RECORDS.
MIHIA THAR BOX OFFICE, HUDSON'S, & ALL CTC OUTLETS.
Ii II k IB II91

Fan stabbed at Stones concert

0

HOUSTON (UPI)- Police yesterday held a 16-
year-old concession worker in the fatal stabbing of a
fan at a Rolling Stones concert in the Astrodome, the
second death on the band's current 32-city U.S. tour.
Police said Wesley Shelton of Houston was stabbed
twice in the chest during a fight with a worker at a
sixth-level concession stand about 10 p.m. Wed-
nesday, 15 minutes after the band took the stage. He
died 30 minutes later at Ben Taub Hospital.
"WHAT I'VE been told is the man supposedly took
some nachos (a snack food) without paying," Detec-
tive L.W. Hoffmaster said. "We're still in-

vestigating."
Hoffmaster said the suspect was arrested at a
motel across the street. His name was withheld
because he was a juvenile and had not been formally
charged.
Police said off-duty officers working security at the
motel arrested the suspect after a man complained
his watch was stolen. The boy later was identified as
a suspect in the knifing.
THERE ALSO were reports of two rapes related to
the concert, but police said they were unable to con-
firm them. They said records were incomplete but

they had nine dispatcher calls at the concert, most of
them drunks or disturbances.
The killing was the second death on this U.S. tour
by the Stones. Two hours before the band's Oct. 15
concert in Seattle's Kingdome, a 16-year-old girl died
of injuries in a fall from a stadium ramp while
waiting to see the band.
Rolling Stones spokesman Paul Wasserman in Los
Angeles expressed regret about the Houston death
but said it would not affect the band's schedule. The
Stones went ahead with their second concert in
Houston last night.

0

U.S. could suf fer a deeper recession

ยข

of d

WASHINGTON (AP) - An
"especially steep plunge" in a key
government index foretells a national
economy already in a mild recession
sinking even deeper in the next few
months, a top Commerce Department
official said yesterday.
"The only real question is how far it is

going to drop," said Assistant
Secretary Robert Dederick.
BUT DEDERICK and other analysts
inside and outside the government say
they don't foresee a downturn as sharp
as last year's recession.
The Commerce Department said
yesterday that the government's Index
of Leading Indicators fell 2.7 percent in
September, the biggest drop since April
1980. Since April 1981, the index has
fallen 5.5 percent.
Dederick called the new decline "an
especially steep plunge" in the index,
which is designed to forecast future
trends of the economy.

"THE REPORT strongly suggests
that industrial production will be down
for the third successive quarter. Any
upturn is unlikely before early 1982.
"The iffy question," he said, "is
whether it is going to turn around in the
first quarter or the second" of next
year.
At the same time, the Labor Depar-
tment reported yesterday that over all
business productivity fell at an annual
rate of 1.9 percent in the third quarter,
the biggest decline since the first quar-
ter of 1978.
AND FEDERAL Reserve Board
Chairman Paul Volcker told senators

on Capitol Hill that it is "quite
possible" the economy was in a
recession. But he declined to make any
flat declaration, saying a recession is
"something you pronounce after the
event when you can see what's hap-
pening."
But Dederick agreed with his boss,
Commerce Secretry Malcolm Baldrige,
that the Reagan administration's
forecasts of a 3.4 percent average
growth throughout 1982 may be too op-
timistic.
"The year-over-year growth could
well turn out to be less than what was
earlier projected," he said.

je
r
?0

Groups donates money
to aid Atlanta families

By SUSAN SHARON
A $1,000 donation to families of the
slain children in Atlanta was given to a
local official of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference during a news
conference at the Trotter House yester-
day.,
The money, presented by Michael
Shane of the University's
Afromusicology Society, was raised
primarily through a recenty musical
production. Twelve area churches of
various denominations and University
music school students combined talents
for the cause.
"IT WAS A beautiful thing," Shane
said. "Black and white joined together

for a common bond."
John Powell, vice president of the
local branch of the SCLC accepted the
donation on behalf of his group. The
money will be sent to Ralph Abernathy,
the organization's director, and added
to a trust-fund set up for the victims
families.
Other Afromusicology Society fun-
draising efforts that contributed to the
$1,000 donation include a dance last
April and a "Ribbon Day" in the Diag.
President Reagan has sent $900,000 of
federal money to be used to investigate
the killings. "This is the most expen-
sive manhunt in all of history," Shane
said.

1S

W IN E is the civilized accompaniment to every
meal, but many would-be wine lovers have been intimidated
by high prices, fancy names, and haughty service.
The LORD FOX is offering a remedy for this: with
presentation of this ad, we are offering our patrons a com-
plimentary glass of wine chosen to enhance EACH COURSE
of the meal. Ask our wine steward for suggestions, and begin
to learn everything about wine you were afraid of before.
This offer is good Sunday thru Thursday only.
And while you're at it, you, can enjoy our
UNIQUE SETTING ...
CONTINENTAL SPECIALTIES..
BEEF WELLINGTON, CAESAR SALAD,
FLAMING DESSERTS
Over 300 Domestic & Imported Wines
Lunch: M-F 11:30-2 tP.kf W';If
Dinner: M-Th 5-10, F-Sat 5-11
Sun 3-8:30 ( )z 8 - .zqo (S%
Reservations Recommended

0

Ap

RECORDS & TAPES
523 E. Liberty
MON-THURS 10-9
m -A '1 AIn 0Af

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan