100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 10, 1981 - Image 58

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 18-B-Thursday, September 10, 1981-The Michigan Daily
The art..

BY JULIE HINDS
Although many students may find
the greatest common denominator of
the University is studying, the impor-.
tance they attach to it ranges from just;
squeezing by to overwhelming levels of
obsession.
"It's funny how you can study your
life away and not know what's going on
in the world," said Moe Curran, an LSA
sophopmore. "Sometimes it seems like
~Reagan gets shot, but who cares, you
shave a test tomorrow."
MANY STUDENTS find studying the
surest way to calm GPA woes.
However, instead of finding a direct
link between increased studying and

tion between studying and test results.
One LSA freshman, who took two tests
for the same class within a week, said,
"The first one I took I didn't study at
all, and for the second one I studied my
butt off. I got the same grade on both."
Many Angell scholars (students who
receive all As or A-s for two consecutive
terms), however, attribute their high
GPAs to studying at greater lengths
than other students.
Larry Blase, an, LSA junior and an
Angell Scholar, says his weekly
average of 25 study hours puts him in a
different league from his friends.
Blase, who feels studying is "more im-
portant to him than going to class,"

Sometimes it seems like Reagan gets

namen
Y. Doily Photo
sudying

'4F4
. j,
" R ::..
@a
- '4*-~
'4; 4
14
w
' 1'4
, 34
_4' . '.'

shot,

but who

cares,

you have a test

tomorrow.

-Moe Curran
an LSA sophomore

rising grades, Prof. Howard Schuman's
Sociology 310 class conducted a study
which found little or no correlation bet-
:,ween the hours students reported
studying and the size of their total GPA.
The most recent data stated the small
correlation found between studying and
GPA related to students who reported
seven or more hours of studying per'
day. These students reported com-
paratively higher GPAs, Schuman said.
The professor said a correlation was
found between attending class and
GPA. "The more often they (students)

said a student can miss lectures and do
well if he knows the right things to
study.
LSA SENIOR Matthew Horwitch is
the rare student who is able to maintain
a straight-A average and study less
than his friends.
He says studying and balancing his
participation on the tennis team is "a
constant struggle." But Horwitch says
his study time is more concentrated
than a student who "just picks up his,
books and goes off to the UGLI."
Students who participate in outside
activities that take up at least as much
time as their studying must manage
their time carefully. Mary Sue Patek,

Zzzzzzzzzzzzz: A strategic reservation of mental energy
.of

report going to class, the1
do," he said.
SOME STUDENTS find

better they
no connec-

an LSA sophomore, says she spends
some 30 hours a week working for In-
tervarsity and Young Life Christian
groups.
"THE ONLY time I can study is past
midnight," she said.
Patek, who is seeking a religious
vocation, describes her work as "an
education in itself," a common
justification for the time spent away
from studies by active students.
Sometimes participation in ex-
tracurricular activities can lead to bet-
ter study habits:
LSA sophomore Mary Furgason says
her participation on the Women's soft-
ball team caused her GPA "to go up a

whole point." She said having less time
to study and utilizing her time helped to
stop procrastination.
Study levels may also be strongly
related to field of concentration. The
Sociology 310 survey found that people
in natural sciences reported more study
hours than either students in the social
sciences or humanities.
"In Engineering, you've got to keep
up," sophomore Shelley Crane said.
"Everything practically is required, so
everyone is competing together. They
(engineering) don't give out As as often
as LSA."
Students with study problems have
several options to better their work

habits. The Coalition for the Use of
Learning Skills no longer offers specific
study skills programs, but study groups
are held for common introductory
courses in chemistry, math, and
foreign languages. The voluntary
groups operate on a walk-in basis, and
CULS director John Russ reports a "big
bulge of attendance" around mid-terms
and finals. Students often use the study
groups as "a catch-up service" if
they've fallen behind in class, Russ
said.
Participation in CULS, which
has traditionally served minority
students, is open to anyone, Russ said.
The study groups everage 25 percent

non-minority participation.
A more drastic alternative to sfudy
problems and related grade worries is
withdrawing from a troubling ur'.r
Withdrawing, which can be done -f 6
the third to ninth week of each term, i"
primarily grade oriented, according
Chuck Judge, director of LSA academ
counseling.
Judge said that as many as 1500 drops
occur each term. The poor perform.
ance leading to withdrawals comes not
from "an ability issue, but an issue, f
motivation," Judge said. Some wiTh;
drawals come from students "gett ng
Cs when they prefer to get As," Judge
added.

*4 II/

There's no MAGIC
to it:
Read THE DAISLV
764-0558

I---

Residence Hall

Assoc.

, , 1
4, ,
4 4 .,

b.

coorinates dorm it

.w G~ .0 / 1

s%

By JENNIFER MILLER
Until this term, students have been
required to pay any amount, no matter
how high, a dormitory house decides to
charge for dues. House dues are used.
for activities such as parties or
providing exam-time snacks.
The arbitrary nature of the dues
requirement from house to house
caused problems, which the Residence
Hall Association helped solve by
recommending the Housing Office
place a ceiling of $15 on all house dues
starting this fall. A house can ask for a
voluntary contribution to raise more
money for activities, Drouillad said,
but it cannot require that everyone pay
the extra amount.

COMPRISED OF elected orappoin-
ted students who live in the dorms, the
RHA serves as a liason between dorm
dwellers and the Housing Office.
"We're a way to voice complaints,"
said Lisa Drouillard, chairman of the
RHA. "It's important that students
know this resource is available.
The RHA took action on the dues
requirements for several reasons,
Drouillard said.
The requirement is usually explained
at the first house meeting, but accor-
ding to Drouillard, "freshmen were not
always made aware of it (the
meeting)."
THIS LACK OF communication
caused some problems, Drouillard

said. "Someone knocks on your front
door and asks for $20, and you don't
know what's going on," she said, "most
people are resentful because it's such a
surprise. That first house meeting is so
important," because activities and
dues are voted on by the majority.
Many students complained about
paying for activities they didn't par-
ticipate in, Drouillard said, and others
refused to pay but joined in activities
anyway; this wasn't fair to those who
paid dues.
The dorm house could place a
maximum $5 hold credit on students
who had not paid for activities.
However, because the dues were
usually much higher than that, those
students who. did pay sometimes felt
cheated.
ADDITIONALLY, not all students

ones
could afford the high dues some house
were charging.
Last year the RHA was instrumental
when the dorm cafeterias switched
from Dannon yogert to a cheaper .
brand, and students complaine- bit-
terly. The change was based on taste
tests given to high school students
staying in the dorms for summer con-
ventions, Drouillard said.
The RHA conducted its own,, taste
test and proclaimed Dannon the win-
ner, convincing the Housing Office not
only to drop the cheaper brand but alo
to use University students in future
taste tests. "It set an important
precedent," Drouillard said. _,
"If students are aware of a sitiaton
or a common problem, they ht1ld
come to 'us," Drouillard said, "We're
all students, we all live in the dorms,
too."
~-

WHATEVER
YOUR PHOTO NEEDS
We Can Serve You!

In addition to our selection of popular cameras, lenses, filters, tripods,
electronic flash, gadget bags, frames, albums; etc.
We feature a full line of
DARKROOM EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES
Enlargers - Easels - Trays - Timers - Graduates - Thermometers, etc.
COMPLETE SELECTION OF PAPER & CHEMICALS
FOR BOTH BLACK & WHITE AND COLOR

PROMPT
HIGH QUALITY
PHOTO FINISHING
by
Eastman Kodak,
Guardian Photo and
Precision Photographics
WE OPERATE OUR OWN
PRECISION CAMERA
REPAIR SERVICE
located on the lower level of our store)

OUR KNOWLEDGEABLE
PERSONNEL
are ready to answer
any of your
photographic questions
HIGH QUALITY
I.B.M. COPIES
or
XEROX COLOR
while you wait service

Are you living
in an apartment next year?
WHAT ABOUT MEALS?.
We at McDONALD'S
can help!
In addition to being an
equal opportunity employer,
we offer many benefits for our crew:
FREE MEALS
FLEXIBLE HOURS
CONVENIENT LOCATION
GOOD STARTING SALARY

SUBSCRIBE . . .
NOW
CALL 764-0558
y.0

I I

WOLVERINE
FANS!
What you'ye been longing for is finally here -a publication deal-
ing exclusively with University of Michigan sportsi
SUBSCRIBE Now to
ar14U. (c~ I0 I yia . yui e INSIDE WOLVERINE SPORTS

I

10 slick magazines. at least 36 pages each, filled with
wel -written features and beautiful photography, both color
and black and white.
Vi'20 newsletters, updating readers on the latest U-M sports

U

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan