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October 27, 1981 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-27

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 27, 1981-Page 5

Grant to attractwomen to science

The Department of Educational
Resources at The University School of
Dentistry has been awarded a two-year
grant for producing eight educational
videotapes designed to attract young
women to careers in science.
Funds of $142,600 for the first year of
the project have been received from the
Women's Educational Equity Act
Program, U.S. Department of
Education.
The "Women in Science Videotape
Series" aims to encourage junior high,
senior high, and college age women
who are talented in mathematics or

science to elect courses or curricula in
preparation for possible careers in
science-related fields.
Seven videotapes will feature four
women as role models in dentistry,
chemistry, geology, physical science,
engineering, computer science and
biomedicine. These areas, currently
underrepresented by women, have
been identified as offering good career
opportunities. The four role models in
each videotape will vary in personal
and professional life style, age, ethnic
background,-and occupation within the
field.

THE EIGHTH videotape will portray
the dilemma of a high school age
woman who is talented and interested
in math and science but is discouraged
from taking science-related courses by
peers, counselors, teachers, and paren-
ts.
The tapes will be used in science
career workshops and counseling
sessions in high schools and colleges
across the country. After viewing a
videotape, participants will receive a
brochure which describes . the
academic preparation required for the
featured field plus an overview of the

occupations and opportunities in
science.
Project director is Christine Black,
senior research associate at the School
of Dentistry, with Dr. David Starts,
chairman of the Department of
Educational Resources, serving as prin-
cipal investigator. Also participating in
the project is Dr. Barbara Sloat, coor-
dinator of the Women in Science
Program at the Center for Continuing
Education of Women. The Advisory
committee for the videotape series is
composed of U-M women faculty from
various scientific disciplines.

Slain convict linked
to Brinks car heist

Enjoy your 'U' Life Better
-Join The Daily

NEW YORK (AP) - Aconvict slain in
a gunbattle with police was linked
yesterday to the earlier $1.6 million
Brink's heist in which members of the
Weather Underground allegedly killed
two policemen. and a guard.
Police sources said a .38-caliber slug
found in the pocket of the convict, Sam
Smith, came from the gun of Nyack
Police Sgt. Edward O'Grady Jr., one of
those killed last Tuesday.
SMITH WAS killed and Nathaniel
Burns, a former Black Panther, was
arrested after Friday's shootout. Both
men were wearing bulletproof vests
and Smith had a bandaged chest wound
consistent with having a slug stopped
by his vest. ,
O'Grady, another police officer and a
Brink's guard were killed last Tuesday
during the ambush of a Brink's ar-
mored car and subsequent shootout in,
suburban Nyack that led to the arrest of
Weather Underground radicals
Katherine Boudin and Judith Clark and
two others.

Daily Photo by BRIAN MASCK
ssault and bicycle
The owner of this ill-fated vehicle soon discovered the merits of walking af-
ter parking his bike at a rack on Maynard Street.

- I
U Uphobia clinic helps
students overcome fears
( Continued from Page 1)

The ballistics test provided the first
definite link between the two incidents,
a police source said.
SMITH AND BURNS were spotted in
the borough of Queens last Friday in a
car with a license plate matching one
seen on a car connected by police to the
Brink's case.-
The ballistics results came as a grand
jury sitting in a Queens courthouse
began hearing evidence stemming
from the shootout involving Burns and
Smith.
Extra heavy security was in place at
the courthouse. Authorities were
especially concerned about security
because schematic diagrams of the
Queens court buildings were among the
materials confiscated in 10 raids in the
metropolitan area since the Brink's job
and the arrest of four, including
Boudin.
SMITH'S POLICE record included
charges of attempted murder and rob-
bery. He was imprisoned in 1971 for an
armed robbery in which he shot and
wounded two officers but jumped
parole two years later.
But police said Smith had no known
connections with any radical or
terrorist group.
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the symptoms are often the same. The
confusion in defining the phobia lies in
the actual cause of the patient's fear.
For example, two persons may both
have an irrational fear of a large shop-
ping mall. But the root of each of their
fears may be totally different; one may
fear the crowds and the other fear the
ctual place-its openness, being far
away from exits, or being away from
home.
IN THE treatment of phobias, it is
helpful not to label the patient's phobia
too readily. Often, phobias occur in
clusters or overlap with other phobias.
There are no absolutes in phobia treat-
ment or study.
Greg (not his real name), a recent
SA graduate, first learned about' the
phobia clinic in a Michigan Daily ar-
ticle on agoraphobia last year. He is
ow working to overcome his phobia,
hich involves anxiety and is sparked
by his anticipation of the actual event, a
panic attack. Greg, who is considered a
possible agoraphobic, said, "A panic
attack would happen out of the blue.
Once I was at a restaurant with
someone, became very nervous and ac-
tually got sick."
Greg's fear restricted him from
restaurants, from traveling and
cializing. He didn't understand what
was the matter with himself, he was
frightened and ashamed. He faced his
problem alone and didn't tell family or
friends.
A THERAPIST at the phobia clinic,
Kathleen Peoples, carried out Greg's
program. They worked together and
concentrated on areas Greg had the
most trouble with: Large stores, eating
in puIllic places and driving.
Greg said his treatment has been
very helpful. "It helps to have a coach
hen you are unsure of yourself. You
need an objective person to draw out
the specifics of your program and pace
you."
Greg said he is concerned with the
treatment of phobias by the media. Un-

til recently, little information has been
given the public on the subject of
phobias and mainly the coverage has
been in woemp's magazines.
MOST KNOWN phobics are women,
a condition Greg believes may be
brought on by social roles of men and
women. , Social conditioning expects
men to deal with the problems alone
and fear isn't acceptable. Greg said
that just as many men suffer from
phobias. as women, but men . are
ashamed to admit they are afraid.
"Panic is a dread word among
males," he said. I hid my problem

N

because I was afraid of what people
would think"
Greg also said magazines directed to
a male audience are not supportive of
phobics, "Playboy doesn't write about
phobias or anxieties," Greg said. "It
doesn't fit in with its macho image."
Further education on phobias and
anxieties, may help people with fears
will realize there is nothing to be
ashamed of and that help is available,
Greg said. "Up until recently, I had.no
idea that this was something other
people had. I thought I was alone"
THIS FRIDAY ONLYI
At the Michigan Theatre
FRANK ZAPPA'S
3:00, 6:00, 9:00,
12:00 Midnight
Join
News Staff

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The next time you
pick up your car keys and
head for the door, ask
'yourself whether a phone
call could save you the
trip-and the wasted
gasoline.
For a free booklet
with more easy tips on
saving energy and money
write "Energy," Box 62,
Oak Ridge, TN 37830.
ENERGY.
We can't afford
to wasteit.

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ING OCTOBER 14th.

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