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October 25, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-25

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I'

Page 2-Sunday, October 25, 1981-The Michigan Daily
FBI probes radicals-IR A link

NEW YORK (UPI) - The FBI said
yesterday it is investigating the
'possibility of a link between-the violent
'radicals suspected of ambushing a
Brink's armored truck and European
"terrorist groups, including the Irish
"Republican Army.
Two fugitives suspected of belonging
to the gang, known as the May 19th
Coalition, were arraigned yesterday as
M funerals were held for two police of-
ficers and a guard who died in the
bloody ambush in the city's suburbs.
LOCAL AND STATE police pressed a
two-state manhunt for more members
of the new group, believed to be a union
of the long dormant Weather Un-
derground and the Black Liberation Ar.
my.
The manhunt has turned up a star-
tling string of "safehouses" throughout
the metropolitan area, stocked with
weapons, disguises and radical

literature.
It has also resulted in a series of arrests
of Weather Underground and BLA
fugitives sought in a series of crimes
including the $1.6 million armored car
holdup in Nanuet, N.Y., last Tuesday,
the prison break of BLA leader Joanne
Chesimard and the creation of a .
Hoboken, N. J., bomb factory.
IN RESPONSE TO reporters'
questions at a news conference, Ken-
neth Walton, head of the FBI's New
York office, said his agency was in-
vestigating possible links between the
tightly knit radical grup and the IRA
and other European terrorist
organizations.'
"We are looking at it as part of (our
ongoing) investigation," Walton said.
He also said the group was respon-.
sible for ambushes of at least three ar-
mored cars in recent months., Another
Brink's guard was shot dead in one of,

the holdups, which took place in a Bronx
shopping center last June. A total of
$900,000 was taken
IN THEIR WIDENING search for in-,
formation on the gang, police raided
three more apartments Friday, two in
Queens and one in Manhattan, but no
evidence was found, Walton said.
While the -manhunt continued, the
Brink's guard and two police officers
killed in the armored car ambush and
subsequent shootout were buried. Four
people, including Weather Un-
derground fugitive Kathy Boudin, are
under arrest in that attack.
The Rev. O.T. Moore, Jr., pastor of
the Pilgrim Baptist Church, praised of-
ficers Waverly Brown and Sgt. Edward
O'Grady, saying, "They lived as
brothers ought to live, They worked as
a team ought to work. They were slain
as heroes together."

More than 3,000 officers stood at at-
tention during the funeral of Brown and
later of O'Grady. Stores in the sleepy
Rockland County village were shut-
tered and flags flew at half staff.
Reputed Weather Underground
leaders Jeffrey Carl Jones and Eleanor
Stein Raskin, arrested in their Bronx
apartment Friday, were ordered held
on $200,000 bail by U. S. Magestrate
Kent Sinclair of U.S. District Court in
,Manhattan.
Jones and Raskin, who lived with
their 4-year-old son, had been sought in
connection with the operation of a bomb
factory police raided in Hoboken, N.J.
in 1979.
The couple's lawyer, Morton Stavis,
asked Sinclair to release them in his
custody, saying he has known. Miss
Raskin since she was a child.

Polish
workers
reject
appeals

WARSAW, Poland (UPI)- Despite a government threat to
call out the army, union chapters yesterday flatly rejected'
the Solidarity leadership's appeal to end a wave of wildcat
strikes by at least 300,000 workers across Poland.
A one-hour nationwide strike-only the second in the
history of Communist Poland-was still planned for next
Wednesday in spite of an announcement Friday that troops,
would be sent to towns and villages to preserve order.
There was no indication, however, that extra troops had
been deployed yet. The streets of Warsaw and other major
cities remained calm.
BUT WILDCAT STRIKES and strike threats to protest
food shortages or demand the resolution of local grievances
persisted in most of Poland's 49 provinces. They included
general strikes involving at least 270,000 workers in two key
industrial provinces.

And in a dramatic indication that control of the 9.5 million-
member independent union may be slipping away from Lech
Walesa and other Solidarity national leaders, union chapter
after chapter rejected the leadership's appeal for an end to
the unauthorized strikes.
"There has been no indication that any action has been
stopped or suspended after the appeal," a Solidarity
spokesman in Warsaw conceded.
In Tarnobrzeg province, where a general strike by some
120,000 workers idled 250 factories, a local union
spokeswoman defiantly rejected Friday's appeal to return to
work.
In Zielona Gora province in western Poland, some 150,000
were into the third day of a general strike called to demand
the reinstatement of several irer workers.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Demonstrators protest
U.S.-Soviet arms race
LONDON-An estimated 150,000 demonstrators streamed into London's
Hyde Park yesterday for the second mass protest against nuclear weapons
in Western Europe in two weeks. It coincided with a visit to London by
Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger.
Michael Foot, leader of the opposition Labor Party, which is pledged to
scrap Britain's nuclear deterrent and ban American nuclear weapons from
British soil, told the rally: "What we want President Reagan to do is to put
his administration's whole support behind the possibility of real arms reduc-
tions. We believe there- should be no cruise missiles and no Pershings
established in Britain and Western Europe."
Prof. E. P. Thomson of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament said the
protesters were against both the new U.S. nuclear missiles being deployed
throughout Western Europe beginning in 1983 and the Soviet build-up of SS-20
missiles that the American effort is aimed at counter-balancing.
Carter decides against
Post libel suit
WASHINGTON-Former President Jimmy Carter said yesterday he
will not sue The Washington Post for libel over a gossip column item
suggesting that President Reagan's pre-inauguration quarters were bugged.
Carter, in a statement, also sharply criticized gossip columns and the
reporting of rumors, particularly by a newspaper of The Post's stature.
Post Publisher Donald Graham wrote Carter and his wife Thursday
-apologizing for the Oct. 5 item in the newspaper's "The Ear" column and
retracting the story, a retraction carried Friday in a story on the Post's front
page.
'Mr. Graham's letter, although tardy, has now included a complete and
full retraction of the libelous news story, a public apology and a clarification
of a policy concerning the printing of unverified rumor," Carter said in a
statement read to reporters by spokesman Jody Powell.
"We have therefore decided to take no further action in this matter,"
said Carter.
Man arrested in New York
nun slaying case
CHICAGO-A 22-year-old man was arrested in the rape and torture of a
New York City nun whose body was slashed with 27 crosses. Police said he
confessed because he feared the revenge of an outraged Mafia.
Harold Wells, a former Chicago resident was seized as he and a
girlfriend, identified only as "Sugar," stepped off a bus at the downtown
Greyhound terminal.
Sgt. Thomas Kelley said after officers read Wells his rights, the suspect
confessed to the Oct. 10 attack and told authorities he had fled New York for
fear of his life.
"He told us he wanted to talk about it," Kelley said. "We told him he
didn't have to.
"He said he was in fear of his life, that the New York Mafia had offered a
$25,000 contract on his life. He fled to Chicago to save his life."
Guerrillas kidnap and burn
Khomeini loyalist
BEIRUT, Lebanon- Mujahedeen Khalq guerrillas kidnapped and bur-
, ed <t death'a provincial government official loyal to Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini; Tehran Radio said yesterday. The, broadcast also implicated
followers of a dissident ayatollah in the killing.
Parliament Speaker Hashemi Rafsanjani, who claimed Friday that 90
percent of the Mujahedeen Khalq guerrilla group had been destroyed, called
for accelerating the process of eliminating dissidents, and said the "roaring
waves of the revolution will swallow them up."

S

Argentina and The Revolution".
DR. RICHARD COUCH will be speaking on the follow-
ing occasions about the revolution in Latin America:
TUESDAY LUNCH-DISCUSSION AT THE
INTERNATIONAL CENTER--12 Noon
603 E. MADISON STREET
WEDNESDAY AT THE ECUMENICAL
CAMPUS CENTER-7:30 P.M.
921 CHURCH STREET
THURSDAY LUNCH-FORUM AT THE
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN-12 Noon
1432 WASHTENAW AVENUE
FRIDAY MORNING AT THE
WESLEY FOUNDATION-9:30 A.M.
602 E. HURON STREET
SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE AT
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH-9:30 & 11 A.M.
1432 WashtenawAvenue
Dr. Couch has been in Argentina under United Presbyterian auspices since
1959. He has served as Director of the River Plate Christian Study Center
dnd teaches practical theology in Buenos Aires. He has worked actively in the
area of human rights in Argentina.,He is currently on leave in the USA.
Sponsored by: The Ecumenical Campus Center, First Presbyterian Church,
and Office of Ethics and Religion,°U. of M.
HOUSING WINTER TERM, 1982
University Family Housing
Applications Available, Monday, October 26
University Residence Halls
Applications Available, Thursday, October 29
Telephone 763-3164
Off-Campus Housing
Listings, Roommate Matching, Advice, Meditation
Telephone 763-3205
HOUSING INFORMATION OFFICE
1011 STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING
8 a.m.-12; 12:30-4:30 p.m.

32 hospitalized at
Flint football game

104

FLINT, Mich. (UPI)-Officials said
yesterday freezing temperatures,
exhaustion and the power of suggestion
led to near panic at a high school foot-
ball game and sent nearly three dozen
students to the hospital.
Thirty-two young people, most of
them members of the Flint Beecher
High School marching band, were
taken to four local hospitals late Friday
with symptoms including shivering,
hyperventilation and weak pulse rates.
"WE WERE ON THE brink of a real
panic," said Brian Hodge, a hospital
spokesman. "The real issue here is that
we had some students out in the cold ...
and a combination of cold and fatigue
caused some to have body stress and
chills.
"Then it became a near-panic
situation with rumors spreading about,
tainted chocolate and contaminated
water."

Only one of the students was
hospitalized, Hodge said, and that was
for reasons unrelated to the Friday
night incident.
BAND DIRECTOR Ronald Brown
said the -first student became ill just
before the 105-member band began its
halftime presentation at school's
homecoming game.
Near the close of the halftime show,
he said, several other students collap-
sed and the band was ordered to stop
playing.
Band member Darrin 'Coggins, 15,
said many students were upset and
crying when they began feeling ill and
saw their friends collapsing.
"They didn't know what was wrong
because everybody was falling dqwn,
he said. . " .,
The temperature at game time was 31
degrees with a wind chill factor of 11.

10

10

Student activists meet
to build national ties

ulb 'IIE tbtoit tirll

II

(Continued from Page 1)
Scripps said, taking time out from a
group attempt to write a conference
resolution on U.S. intervention in El
Salvador. She said she hoped to learn
new strategies at the conference which
her organization could employ in its ef-
forts to build support for Puerto Rican'
independence.
Many of the students said their
reasons for attending the conference
were riot so much to spread their
political views as to hear what was
happening at other campuses.
TOM JACKSON, president of Iowa
State University's Government of the
Student Body, said he found the con-
ference to be "an opportunity to share
information with students who view
themselves as progressive."
Jackson, who was staffing the table
spread with literature from various
Iowa-based political organizations, said
that even though people may think of
Iowa and other midwestern universities
as "hick schools," and lacking in ac-
tivist movements, Iowa State suffers
many of the same problems as other

universities.
"We're hurting from budget cuts
and worried about military interven-
tion, too," Jackson said.
Ken Munz, a history major at the
University of Wisconsin in Madison,
said he was glad to have the chance to
meet both "old timers" in the activist
movement and those students new to
activist organizations. He said he felt
all participants had been successful in
"putting aside basic ideological dif-
ferences" to discuss current issues.
BUT, "IDEOLOGICAL differences"
did clash during the conference yester-
day when members of the Spartacus
Youth League, a communist student.
group, attempted to register for the
conference. People United For a
Human Future, another campus group
which sponsored the conference locally
charged that the SYL is too "disrup-
tive."
In turn, the SYL countered that PUHF
and other conference participants who
voted to bar, them from the activities
were engaging in "political censor-
ship" and were not allowing a full
debate of issues.
Keith Madden, a representative of
the Progressive Student Network, in
Washington D.C., said the conference
organizers had decided last year to
prohibit the SYL from participating.
"It's not their politics we're intolerant
of, it's their practices," Madden said.

* Vol. XCII, No. 40
Sunday, October 25, 1981
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PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
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1982
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