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October 22, 1981 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-22

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Page 10-,Thursday, October 22, 1981-The Michigan Daily

Michi

gan harrier
By JEFF QUICKSILVER Donakowski from co
Welcome to the four year saga of Gerard outdoor track seaso
Donakowski. The story begins with a freshman hard during the offs
all-state high school runner arriving on the and ready to contribu
Michigan campus with great expectations, and harriers.
concludes with a highly talented senior eyeing It was not to be,
the Big Ten Championships. In between, would fail to mak
however, are two years of frustration, pain, and sophomore and jun
withdrawal from running. weren't physical, the
In his freshman year Donakowski was fourth "I had lost the des
man on the cross country team and a 16th place longer the most imp
finish in the Big Ten Championships highlighted Donakowski. "I wasa
his performance. lacked the motivatio
"BASICALLY I found out that there was a big achieve my potential
difference between high school and collegiate SURPRISINGLY e
running," said Donakowski. "All of sudden bitter against the coa
everyone you're competing against is a state given up on him.
champion. Natural ability is no longer "Ron's job was to
enough-desire and motivation to run up to your could, not to motivat
potential are the key ingredients." be helped. The first s
An injury at the end of the season prevented from yourself that

rekindles lost desire

ompeting in the indoor and
n. However, after training
eason he was healthy again
ute to Coach Ron Warhurst's
however, as Donakowski
ke the team in both his
nior years. His problems
y were attitudinal.
ire to run. Running was no
portant thing to me," said
a loser. I had the talent but I
on to go out and strive to
."
nough, Donakowski was not
ach or anyone else who had
o make the best team he
te me when I didn't want to
tep has to be a commitment
you want to do it," said'

Donakowski.
The spark to run again came from
Donakowski's older brother. "He never stopped
encouraging me to run," said Donakowski. "All
of a sudden I looked at myself and decided that I
was not a quitter."
THE TURNING point came late in his junior
year during the indoor-outdoor track season. at
the Central Collegiate Indoor Championships
Donakowski won the two-mile race in 8:54. For
Donakowski winning the race was overshadowed
by something far more significant.
"Winning was great, but more importantly I
knew that I went out and gave 100%. I wasn't
doing that before; I didn't have that desire," said
Donakowski.
With a rekindling of the desire to run com-
petitively, Donakowski started slowly this
season due to an ankle injury. However, after a
disappointing 17th place finish in the Springbank
Invitational, and missing the Notre Dame In-

vitational due to injury, Donakowski finished fir-
st in the MSU dual meet last week.
MORE THAN individual success, Donakowski
is hoping for a team championship in the up:
coming Nov. 7 Big Ten meet on the University of
Minnesota campus.
"Confidence is the key. We need seven guys to
believe in our ability to win the Big Ten, and then
go out and run up to their potential. If we can-do
that, we will win the title," said Donakowski.
Although cross country rarely receives the at-
tention and glamour associated with more
popular sports such as football and basketball,,
Donakowski finds the sport exciting and rewar-
ding.
"Everytime you compete you stretch yourself
and your body to the limits. You really get the,
chance to find out what you are capable of," said
Donakowski.
Reaching those limits can be a long and rocky
road. Just ask Gerard Donakowski.

Donakowski'
reaching his potential

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Yanks goose Dodgers, 3-0- lead series, 2-0

V U-7 / /

NEW YORK (UPI) - Tommy John,
using his sinker to perfection, drove his
ex-teammates' championship hopes
deeper into the ground last night with
seven innings of three-hit pitching in
helping the New York Yankees defeat
the Los Angeles Dodgers 3-0 and take a
commanding two-game lead in the
World Series.

Lary Milbourne's two-out, run
scoring double in the fifth inning, which
came after an error by second baseman
Dave Lopes, provided the only run John
and reliever Rich Gossage needed to
defeat Burt Hooton and complete a
home sweep for the Yankees in the first
two games of the Series.
THE YANKEES added a pair of
eighth-inning insurance runs on an RBI
single by Bob Watson and a sacrifice
fly by Willie Randolph.
The best-of-seven Series resumes at
Los Angeles tomorrow night beginning
at 8:30 p.m. EDT, with rookie left-

hander Dave Righetti pitching for New 1
York and rookie left-hander Fernando
Valenzuela going for the Dodgers. It
will mark the first time since 1950 that
two rookie starters will oppose each
other in the Series.
John, 38, who pitched for the Dodgers
against the Yankees in the 1977/and 1978
seasons, struck out four and allowed
only three outfield outs before leaving
the game for a pinch hitter in the seven-
th. Gossage allowed one hit over the
final two innings to pick up his second
save of the Series.
AS HAS BEEN the case in the

previous meetings between these club
since 1977, it was a defensive play the
Yankees made and one the Dodgers
didn't that proved to be the difference.
John turned in the defensive gem for
the Yankees when he knocked down
Steve Yeager's hard liner with two out
in the fifth and runners on first and
third and threw but the Dodger catcher
at first.
John set down the first 12 batters in
order, retiring nine on infield groun-
ders, before Steve Garvey broke the
string with a ground single to cente4
leading off the fifth.

BECOME,
PART OF THE
FAIRCHILD SCHOLARS
PROGRAM AT
THE UNIVERSITY
OF MARYLAND

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You Are Eligible if You
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Write or call Prof. Anthony Ephremides,
Director of the Fairchild Scholars Program,
Electrical Engineering Department, Univer-
sity of Maryland, College Park, Maryland
20742. Phone (301) 454-6199.
Or contact the Fairchild Scholars Program
representative when he visits your campus:

S.
,0

DATE:

October 29, 1981

TIME: 9:00 am - 4:30 pm
PLACE: Career Planning & Placement
Room 3200 Student Activities
Building
A Cooperative Program between
the University of Maryland
and Fairchild Industries

UNISEX
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AP Photo
LOS ANGELES DODGERS second baseman Davey Lopes leaps to clear
New York Yankees runner Jerry Mumphrey after tagging the bag for the
forceout in the first inning of last night's World Series game in New York.
Yankees batter Larry Milbourne was safe at first on the play. Dodger shor-
tstop Bill Russell, watches at left.
IM SCORES
Sunday Crush 20, Deep Cleats 0
Football Bursley Boozers 26, Fletch 0
Ruinsey 24, Apocalypse New 0
Fraternity Maclow Profiles 12, 3rd Lewis 6
Theta Chi 4, Triangle 2 (first downs) Graduate/Faculty/Staff
Sigma Nu 20, Delta Tau Delta0 MBA6, DSD0
Kappa Alpha Pi3, Sigma Phi1 (first downs) Trichobezoar 12, ANSMA6
Evans Scholars 8, Alpha Sigma Phi 0 Co-Rec
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 20, Alpha Phi Delta 0 Crusaders 116 Blow Gut 0
Residence Halls Awesome Giants 44, Chicago Maize 0
Class A High Ho's 2, Couzens 0
Oxford 24, Elliott 0

Pat Metheny & Lyle Mays

a'

"The Yellowjackets' album ranks as one of the
finest, most radio-accessible jazz-rock offerings
of the year. Gut reaction to The Yellowjackets par-
allels the power of the Crusaders (the good of
Crusaders with Larry Carlton, etc.). Featured musi-
cians include Russell Ferrante on keyboards, Rob-
ben Ford on guitar. A digital recording produced
by Tommy LiPuma, Yellowjackets floats like a but-
terfly, stings like a bee and sounds like a hornets'
nest of honey-dipped jazz/rock. An extremely
FRED MOORE
July 6,1981
Includes Matine ti n t
The Hre \' ::

As Falls Wichita
So Falls Wichita Falls

MEEKREH Sponsors:
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Saturday, October 24
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PAT MFTHENY & LYLE MAYS

Pat Metheny, electric and accoustic
six and twelve string guitars, bass.
Lyle Mays, piano, synthesizer,
organ, autoharp.
With Nana Vasconcelos, berimbau,
percussion, drums, vocals.
On ECM Records & Tapes
Manufactured & distributed by
Warner Bros. Records Inc.

As Falls Wichita.
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iCM'1'19
"A uwinninn mix of PIPCtrrnnirt innovation

W

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