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October 21, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-21

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.,

Page 2-Wednesday, October 21, 1981-The Michigan Daily
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CLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS EYEGLASS FRAMES
GOLD COINS GOLD PINS GOLD CUFF LINKS
BROKEN JEWELRY
a DIAMONDS GOLD WATCHES PtiY SILVER
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any color stone. Tea Sets * Jewelry *"IndustrooIl

They say it's
OK to be fat

We pay by weight

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State certified scales

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 21 -
7:30 pm-TROTTER HOUSE
DAners Angelica Guevers Senegas
Representative of AMES (Association of Women of
El Salvador) and former trade union organizer. She
has been imprisoned twice by the El Salvador
security forces and can speak first hand of Human
Rights abuses. She will be speaking about women
in El.Salvador and current developments in the
struggle there.
Sponsored by:Latin America Solidarity Comm. (LASC)
(in cooperation with the Office of Ethics & Religion)

(Continued from Page 1)
tive woman at a party, I don't have to
be wistful, as I used to be," Mydlarz
said.
More important than the ego boost,
he said, is the great weight NAAFA has
lifted from his mind. He can now "get
on with the business of living."
AS ONE OF about three men in the
12-person state group, Mydlarz is a
minority. He said he considers himself
fat at 270 pounds, but noted that thin
men also attend NAAFA meetings.
"A lot of men like large women,"
Kessler said. "But mostare afraid to
admit it. It's not socially acceptable."
- NAAFA neither condemns nor con-
dones dieting. While NAAFA members
acknowledge the health hazards of
obesity-though they say they are

exaggerated-many contend the
psychological effects of dieting can be
more harmful than carrying the extra
weight.
SOME MEMBERS are content at
their present weight. Others, like
Devereaux, say they are determined to
become thin someday.
"I want to be thin, just to see What it
is like," she said.
"I have a fat friend who thinks it's
sick for me to come to these meetings
and say it's OK to be fat. She thinks fat-
ness is thecause of all the misery in the
world. She hates herself.
"I think fat is ugly too. But I want to
be accepted for myself in the mean-
time.
"I say there is no reason to absolutely
hate yourself."

City housing
vacancy soars

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Blast at Belgium synagogue
kills 2; injures 99,
A booby-trapped yellow van exploded near a synagogue in the heart of An-
twerp's diamond district yesterday, killing two women and wounding 99
other people a half-hour before services were to begin, police said. It was the
fourth fatal attack on Jews in Europe in 15 months.
An organization called "Direct Action Group, Section Belgium," claimed
responsibility, but former members of an anarchist groups with a similar
name in France denied any role and said the claim was "idiotic." The
Israeli Embassy blamed the Palestine Liberation Organization, but the PLO
denied the charge.
The van exploded shortly after 9 a.m. in front of the Antwerp Diamond
Club, which is across from a synagogue on Hoveniersstraat, an S-shaped
street guarded at both ends by police cars to prevent diamond robberies and
bolster security because of the recent spate of attacks on European Jews.
Thatcher target of hecklers
Seven demonstrators shouting "jobs not bombs" disrupted Prime Minister
Margaret Thatcher in the House of Commons yesterday after her Conser-
vative government released new figures showing one in eight British
workers have no jobs.
Attendants escorted the protestors from the Public gallery after a brief
scuffle.
An official for Britain's Young Communist League said its members were
responsible for the protest. "We feel this is the only way to get our message
across," he said.
The Department of Employment said 12.4 percent of the work force was
out of a job, unchanged from September, although the total of 1,988,644 was
down 10,145 from the previous month.
State leaders roasted in Navy
memo on Project ELF
DETROIT - Gov William Milliken, Sen. Donald Riegle and Rep. Robert
Davis are roasted in a Navy memo sent last year to President Reagan's
transition team on Project ELF, a Detroit newspaper reported yesterday.
The Detroit Free Press said the 11 page internal memo obtained by its
Washington staff portrays Milliken as secretly in favor of ELF but afraid to
say so and Davis as incapable of understanding its complexities.
And the memo claims Reigle opposed ELF because of misinformation in
the news media about the size of the anti-ELF movement in the Upper
Peninsula, where the submarine communications system is to be built.
Poll says Americans oppose
insanity defense in courts
NEW YORK - Americans believe too many people accused of murder use
the insanity defense to avoid prison, and say court rules should be changed
so there is no insanity plea in murder cases.
The latest Associated Press-NBC News poll, of 1,600 adults telephoned
Sept. 28-29 in a nationwide random sampling, said 87 percent think too many
people accused of murder are using the insanity defense to keep from going
to prison.
Library records bill designed
to hinder'witch hunters'
LANSING - The House Judiciary Committee approved legislation yester-
day designed to prevent witch hunting extremist groups from snooping
through library records to check up on the kinds of books teachers are using.
The bill, sent to the House floor on an 11-1 vote, was introduced by Rep.
Perry Bullard, the committee chairman, in response to controversies that
have developed i. other states over the use of library records.

0

(Continued from Page 1)
interest- usually 0.5 percent - on the
security deposit for every month the
rent is paid on time. Another possibility
is negotiating a rent-reduction agreem-
ent for the end of the year if rent is
paid on time, Williams said.
A privacy clause would state that the
landlord may enter the apartment at a
mutually agreed upon time for minor
repairs, periodic inspections or to show
the unit to prospective tenants. The
tenants should agree not to withhold
their consent unreasonably, Cohen
said, and landlords always have the
right to enter an apartment in case of
emergencies such as fires or water
pipe breaks.
STUDENTS MIGHT want to ask the
landlord for a nine-month lease, but,
Williams said, "I don't think this two-
year trend is well-enough established to
change long-standing landlord policy"
of using 12-month leases.

Cohen and Williams both emphasized
that students should get any agreemen-
ts made in writing. Cohen said a clause
asking for repairs, painting, or refur-
bishing should also " include a
penalty-withholding a part of the
rent-to insure that the landlord does
complete the repairs.
The increase in the vacancy rate is
the result of student financial troubles,
Williams said. Hikes in tuition, rental
rates, general living costs, and cut-
backs in financial aid have prompted
more students to share rooms.
Campus landlords reported that most
of the vacancies this fall were in ef-
ficiencies and one and two-bedroom
apartments.
Declining enrollment was not a factor
behind the slow market, Williams said.
Total enrollment has only declined by
500 students this year, and "fewer
students are commuting than last
year," she said.

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Come to

Vol. XCII, No. 36
Wednesday, October 21, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $12'September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor..Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Doily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room- (313) 764-0552. 76-DAILY. Sports desk. 764.0562. Circulation. 764.0558. Classified advertising
764-0557. Display advertising. 764.0554. Billing 764-0550.

be Mirhigttn ]Datolv

Editor in chief...................SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor ............... JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor .......... . .......LORENZO BENET
News Editor ............... . ........DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors...........CHARLES THOMSON
KEVIN TOTTIS
Sports Editor ..... . ............. MARK MIHANOVIC
Associate Sports Editors ............ GREG DeGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
Chief Photographer.............PAUL ENGSTROM
PHOTOGRAPHERS- Jackie Bell, Kim Hill, Deborah
Lewis. Mike Lucas, Brian Mosck.
ARTISTS: Robert Lence. Jonathan Stewart, Richard
Walk, Norm Christiansen.
ARTS STAFF: Jane Carl, Mark Dighton, Adam Knee,
Pam Kramer, Gail Negbour
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, Beth Allen, Julie Barth,
Carol Chaltron, Andrew Chapman, Lisa Crumrine,
Debi Davis, Ann Marie Fazio, Pam Fickinger, Denise
Franklin, Joyce Frieden. Mark Gindin, Julie Hinds,
Steve Hook, Kathy Hoover, Mindy Layne. Jennifer Mil-
ler. Dan Oberrotman, Janet Rae. David Spok, Fannie
Weinstein, Barry Witt.

SPORTS STAFF
SPORTS STAFF: Barb Barker, Randy Berger, Mark
Borowoski. Joe Chapelle, Martha Croll, Jim Dworman,
John Fitzpatrick, Larry Freed, Chuck Hartwig, Chuck
Jaffe, John Kerr, Larry Mishkin, Dan Newman, Ron
Pollock, Jeff Quicksilver, Steve Schaumberger,
Sarah Sherber, James Thompson, KentWalley, Chris
Wilson, Bob Wonowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager .............RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager........... BARB FORSLUND
Operations Manager ... .. SUSANNE KELLY
Display Monager MARY ANN MISIEWICZ
Classifieds Manager....... DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager ............. ..MICHAEL YORICK
Assistant Disolov Manager. . . .. . NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals Manager .............SUSAN RABUSHKA
Circulation Manager ............. .... KIM WOODS
Sales Coordinator...........E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Liz Altman, Hope Barron, Lindsay
Bray, Joe Broda, Alexander DePillis, Aida Eisenstadt,
Susan Epps, Wendy Fox, Sandy Frcka. Pamela Gould,
Kathryn Hendrick, Anthony interrante, Indre Luitkus,
Beth Kovinsky, Borboro Miner, Coryn Notisse, Felice
Oper, Jodi Pollock, Michael Sovitt, Michael
Seltzer, Karen Silverstein, Sam Slaughter, Adrienne
Strambi, Nancy Thompson. Jeffrey Voigt.

a

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S-M T W -T F S S M T W T, F S
4$ 3- 1 2 3 1 3 45 67 12 3 45
101112 4 6 7 8 9 10 8 1011121314 6 8 9 101112
13 1 l 516 17 18 19 117 t 1314 1516717 15 1 17 18 19 2021
20 22 23 24 25 26 18 2021222324 22 2425 6-2i
1982
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
C. M a 7' T 9 C cr IuIr- us.r . c S MT Wi 7 9t'C I C AIT .WT. c r

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