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October 18, 1981 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

New Years in New Jersey?
RECEIVING

First downs .......
Rushing.........
Passing (comp/att/
Int)...........
Passing yds........
Fumbles (no/lost) .
Punts (no/avg)....

MICH.
15
36/155
6/20/1
108
2/1
5/45.6

IOWA
19
54/171
10/19/0
127
1/1
6/40.7

MI
Carter ...............
Bean ................
Blatcher..........
Granger...........
Hufford .............
Webb................
Brown...............
Moritz..............

ICHIGAN
No. Yds.
5 91
1 17

IOWA
3
2
2
I
I

37
12
31
25
12
10

TD
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1

a

SCORING

RUSHING

MICHIGAN ..........................0 7 0 0-7
Iowa .................................6 0 3 0-9

MICHIGAN
Att. Yds.
Woolfolk ............ 14 .56
S. Smith ............. 11 60
Edwards ............'9 31
Carter ............... 2 8

SCORING PLAYS
lowa-Nichol, 20 FG.
Iowa-Nichol, 36 FG.
MICH-Carter, 17 pass from S. Smith (Haji-Shiekh
kick).
Iowa-Nichol, 30 FG.
PASSING
MICHIGAN
Att. Comp Int. Yds. TD
S. Smith ............. 20 6 1 108 1
IOWA
Bohannon ........... 19 10 0 127 0

Granger..........
Bohannon..........
Blatcher..........
Phillips ..............
Forte................
Brown...............

IOWA
13
12
16
7
3
3

Avg.
4.0
5.3
3.4
4.0
3.5
2.8
2.2
3.0
7.1
5.1

TD
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

44
34
34
21
22
16

PUNTING

MICHIGAN
No. Yds. Avg.
Bracken...... .. . 5 228 45.6

6

IowA
Roby ................ 3
Nichol............... 3

142 47.3
102 34.0

Daly rfoTo Dy KIIH rILL
MICHIGAN QUARTERBACK Steve Smith (16, center) rests dejectedly on his hands and knees toward' the end of yesterday's game..
azor.Shara Blue offense sputters in
By DREW SHARP
a takescharge.. second conference defeat

OWA VS. WISCONSIN for the Big Ten championship-can you believe it?
If that possible match-up was mentioned three weeks ago, it would have
gotten more chuckles than a Northwestern football game. No one, however,
seems to be laughing now.
"This isone great ball game for us," said Iowa head coach Hayden Fry
following his Hawkeyes' 9-7 victory over fifth-ranked Michigan. "The vic-
tory over Michigan is even better than the ones we had over UCLA and
Nebraska because nobody expected us to win simply because Michigan was
playing at home. They had their backs to the wall, and they wanted to go
back to the Rose Bowl."
That's a wish that has faded for the Wolverines, but which now shines
brighter than ever for Iowa.
"I never dreamed we could hold an explosive offense like Michigan's to
just seven points," boasted Fry, revelling in his greatest triumph ever in
three years with the Hawkeyes. "Our game plan was to try and keep the ball
away from their big men-especially Woolfolk, Carter, and Smith-and limit
their effectiveness."
Wolverines were outmanned
Iowa not only limited Michigan's effectiveness, it simply-outmanned the
Wolverines where it matters most-on the line of scrimmage. The Hawkeyes
held possession for 36:56 compared to Michigan's total of 23:04.
The Iowa offensive line of Bruce Kittle, Joe Levelis, Bill Bailey, Ron
Hallstrom, and Paul Postler (not as well known as their Wolverine counter-
parts) repeatedly controlled the line, allowing running backs Norm Granger
and Phil Blatcher to eek out the necessary yardage. Granted, the gains were
nickel and dime, but that is how low scoring games are won. That theory
held true yesterday.
As angry as Michigan fans may be over the outcome, one truth cannot be
denied-Iowa deserved to win: There can be no looking for excuses,
reminiscent of the Wisconsin debacle on Opening Day. The Hawkeyes were
simply the better team out on the field.
All of the pre-season hype and nationwide hoopla over the Wolverines
walking away with the national title has been flushed down the drain-per-
manently. Their "Run for the Roses" has been derailed and for all practical
purposes, Michigan's season came to an end when the final seconds ticked
off the Michigan Stadium clock yesterday.
"Zero to none, no chance," said Wolverine coach Bo Schembechler of his
team's Rose Bowl aspirations. "We are going to play football for the fun of it
from now on. We'll now find out those who came here to play football and
those who came here to win championships."
This was an extremely bitter defeat for Schembechler to swallow because
he has never had a.team in a bleaker situation than right now. True, at this
same time last season, the Wolverines had two blemishes on their record.
But the two setbacks last year were non-conference defeats. This season, the
defeats have come against the present favorites to capture the conference
crown, Wisconsin and Iowa.
"The hell with bowl games"
The defeat may even by a tougher blow to capitalism in Ann Arbor. It looks
as though for the first time in over a decade, a Michigan-Ohio State ticket
may not be worth the paper on which it is printed. The competition in the Big
Ten has gotten so tough that it has added validity to the old college football
adage, "On any given Saturday, any team can beat another."
As much as Schembechler hates to talk about the bowl situation-he said
"The hell with bowl games" following the loss-Michigan's status must still
be considered good in the eyes of the various bowl selectiion committees.
Representatives from the Orange, Cotton, Fiesta, Sun, Bluebonnet, and
Liberty Bowls were present at the game.Assuredly, they must have been
impressed with the high quality of Big Ten football. There is a definite
possibly that the conference may send five teams to post-season play this
season, putting to rest any comments about Big Ten football being weak.
With that in mind, one not only wonders what is going to happen when
perennial conference doormat Northwestern invades Ann Arbor next Satur-
day, but more importantly, whether anyone cares.

"One of our key mistakes was giving up that touch-
down to Carter," said Fry. "I knew they were going
to call that play even before they ran it, and even
though we defended against it properly, they were
still able to score. That's just a tribute to Carter's
ability as a receiver."
Ironically, Carter had one of his most productive
afternoons of the season, nabbing five of Smith's
aerials for 91 yards and the touchdown. In the past
few games, the. speedy wide-receiver has been
drawing double coverage, which stifled his big-play
ability for the Wolverines.
IN THE SECOND half, the Wolverines came out
firing. After Robert Thompson recovered a fumble by
Iowa's Phil Blatcher at the Michigan 45-yard line, the
Wolverines rolled down to the Hawkeyes' 10-yard
line, helped by a 29-yard reception by Carter. Tight
x%

end Norm Betts then dropped a picture-perfect toss
by Smith on second down, and on third down, Iowa
linebacker Mel Cole ended the threat as he picked off
a pass intended for Woolfolk in the end zone.
The Hawkeyes offense came back to move the ball
67 yards in the next 12 plays to the Michigan 13, where
Nichol picked up the third of his field goals, a 30-
yarder that gave Iowa the final 9-7 margin.
Holding the game ball presented to him by his team
after the game, Nichol said, "Today I just looked at
the kicks and said 'There's no way I can miss this.' If
I made them in practice, I can make them in the
game."
WITH 1:51 LEFT in the game, Michigan got the
ball back and began a last-ditch drive at its own 33-
yard line. After completing an 11-yarder to Carter,
Smith hit split end Vince Bean for 16 yards, but a
holding penalty moved the ball all the way back to the

31 and made it first and 23. After three plays netted
the Wolverines 12 yards, Schembechler opted to run
the fourth-and-11 play without using his last time out,
and Smith's desperation pass as he was getting.
sacked fell incomplete, turning the ball back to the
Hawkeyes with 31 seconds left in the game.
The poor showing by the Wolverine offense also put
Woolfolk's assault on the all-time Michigan career
rushing record on hold. The senior from Westfield,
N.J. required 112 yards entering the Iowa game to
surpass Rob Lytle on the top spot on the list, but his
56-yard performance was only half of what he
needed.
Chances are good that Woolfolk will be able to pick
up the needed yardage next week when the
Wolverines host cellar-dwelling Northwestern for
homecoming.

3-

ANTHONY CARTER (1) zeroes in on
a Steve Smith TD pass. The catch gave
the Wolverines a 7-6 second quarter
lead and their only points of the after-
noon. Carter's five receptions for 91
yards could not supply the Wolverine
Power needed as they fell to Iowa 9-7.

6

Daoly Photo by BRIAN MASC
S. .. ..

BLOWS UP

AT PRESS CONFERENCE:

Bo fumes as Michigan swoons

By GREG DeGULIS,
A three-by-five foot black and white poster of a squinting
Bo Schembechler sporting the infamous 'M' baseball cap
stared at the throng of anxious reporters in the Michigan
media room yesterday after the loss to Iowa, 9-7. Comments
such as "how are the bars in Jacksonville" and "there goes
my suntan" bounced among the reporters under the watchful
eyes of the poster. Bo's spirit filled the room, but his flesh
hadn't. arrived yet.
When he finally did emerge from the locker room, Bo
looked angry, as expected. He entered the media room,
stared at the television camera, advanced a step, glanced at
the army of tape recorders on the desk, and finally sat down
with a gruff, "What do you want to know."
IMMEDIATELY, THE reporters inquired about the of-
ficials, 'and specifically about the call overruling Vince
Bean's first down catch with five minutes left in the game.
The call, which stalled a late fourth quarter drive, caused
quite a stir on the Michigan sidelines including some Schem-
bechler jawing with the officials.
"It was a legitimate catch-no doubt about it," Schem-
bechler told the reporters. "In this league, you have to be far

As the post game interview continued, it became more and
more obvious that the calm Schembechler of 1981 finally (and
publicly) had lost his patience. The time was ripe for the
'old dumb question to set off Bo,' but no reporter committed
that error-yet.
The inevitable topic of Big Ten Championship and the Rose
Bowl arose, and Bo made his feeling well known on the
possibility for a Pasadena venture. "Zero to none," he quip-
ped. "No chances. We are going to play football for the fun of
it now. Now we'll find out who came here to play football and
those who came here for championships."
THEN SOMEBODY dropped the bomb.
A reporter asked if Bo had any goals left for the season.
"Goals? I just got beat 9-7 and you're talking about goals,"
Bo fumed.. "What about the smaller bowls," the reporter per-
sisted. "The hell with bowl games," Bo said as he stood up. "I
donut care about any bowls," Bo raved, in front of Orange and
Cotton bowl representatives.
And then silence.
"ANYTHING ELSE?" Bo challenged the group of repor-
ters.
More silence.
Bo paused momentarily and then bolted through the

:Arkansas {
2.S.
dump
Texas
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP)
Unranked Arkansas, ignited by
halfback Gary Anderson and
quarterback Tom Jones, shocked
No. 1 Texas out of the unbeaten
ranks yesterday with a 42-11
Southwest Conference victory
over the astounded Longhorns.
It was the second worst whip-
ping Texas had received from
Arkansas in the 63 years the two
schools have played each other.
The Razorbacks bounced them
42-6 in 1938.
4 The Longhorns joined the
}graveyard ranks of Michigan, .
NotreyDame and Southern
California who had been listed
No. 1 in The Associated Press poll

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