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October 18, 1981 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-18

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Page 2-Sunday, October 18, 1981-The Michigan Daily
State, city and 'U'
woo robotics Industr

THE RUDOLF STEINER INSTITUTE
(a non-profit organization)
presents a public lecture on:
G~esnb~ Jeusand ingArthur
by PETER A. S. SMITH,
Professor of Chemistry, U of M.
PLACE: Rudolf Steiner Institute,
1923 Geddes Avenue, Ann Arbor.
TIME: Saturday, October 24, at 8 pm
Opportunity for questions and for meeting the speaker
after the lecture over refreshments.
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED
A donation of $3 (stud/sr. cit. $2) will be requested to help
cover costs of the lecture program.

By JOHN ADAM
Their work is consistantly perfect,
they never take a coffee break, and
they can't go on strike.
Industrial robots could change the
nature of American industry, and both
the state and University plan to play a
major role in that revolution.
At the state level, Gov. William
Milliken has outlined a plan to create a
$200 million world class robotics
research center.
HERE IN ANN Arbor, the University
Friday allocated an initial $1 million
over the next two years to create a"
campus center for robotics research.
Engineering Dean James Duderstadt
will be recruiting experts from around
the world~
City officials also are playing a large
role in bringing the robotics industry
here. Mayor Louis Belcher has
recruited several robotics and elec-
tronics manufacturing firms from
California.
"When you look at the growth of
future industries, there is no doubt

about it: Robotics is No. 1" Belcher
said.
"THE WHOLE infrastructure of the
Ann Arbor area is highly supportive of
the kind of efforts needed for robotics
companies," said Tim Keating, Vice
President of the U.S. Division of
DeVilbiss, a robot manufacturing firm
Belcher has convinced to come to Ann
Arbor.
There are signals all over the state
that robotics is going to be a key part of
Michigan's future.
LAST MONTH, Prab Conveyors, a
major robot manufacturer in
Kalamazoo, publicly offered shares of
robotics stock for sale - a move that
many say is indicative of the high
degree of optimism in the state.
Detroit will be the site of an inter-
national robotics show held in early
March. More than 40 robot manufac-
tures and equipment suppliers from the
United States, Europe, and Japan have
already reserved space at the show.

Come celebrate

IN BRIEF.
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reportsy
Poisonous fumes prevent
Japanese miners' rescue
TOKYO- Thick poisonous gas fumes and searing temperatures yesterday
forced back rescuers in one of Japan's worst mining disasters, dimming
hopes that 50 trapped coal miners were still alive.
Forty-three others were confirmed dead in the gas leak and fire at the
Yubari coal mine 500 miles north of Tokyo. The body of a man previously
listed missing was found yesterday, reducing those unaccounted for from 51
to 50.
Mine officials said rescue teams sent into the mine had to stop several
hundred yards above the point where poisonous methane and carbon
monoxide gas had gushed into the shaft Friday afternoon.
Guerrillas tried to bomb
Bush's plane, report says
BOGOTA, Colombia- An anonymous caller claimed guerrillas tried to
blow up Vice President George Bush's plane with a bomb that was found at
Bogota's El Dorado international airport, a newspaper reported yesterday.
A bomb of 22 pounds of dynamite and detonator attached to 600 feet of elec-
trical cable was found Friday buried alongside the runway, the Bogota daily
newspapers El Tiempo and El Espectador said yesterday.
A security agent at the airport, asking not to be identified, confirmed that
a bomb was found. El Tiempo said an anonymous caller claimed a guerrilla
group planted the bomb and had intended to blow up Bush's airplane.
Bush arrived last Tuesday about 11 a.m. and left for Brazil at 9 a.m. Wed-
nesday.
The bomb was found buried eight inches deep along a point of the runway
where planes first touch down when landing, airport workers said.
Published versions saying the bomb was close to the international ter-
minal were incorrect, the security agent and the airport workers said.
But the bomb was close enough to the runway that it could have caused an
airplane to crash while landing, the security agent said.
Workers respond to Polish charge
WARSAW, Poland- Replying to a stern speech by Communist Party chief
Stanislaw Kania, more than 3,000 Solidarity shipyard workers accused the
government yesterday of trying to destroy Poland's-independent union
movement.
More than 12,000 striking garment workers also pledged to continue their
five-day-old occupation of Warsaw-area textile mills to protest chronic food
shortages.
Dock workers held a rally at the Lenin shipyard in Gdansk to reply to
Kania's charge Friday that Solidarity was trying to establish a "totalitarian
dictatorship" in Poland-a charge Solidarity angrily rejected.
As attacks on Solidarity continued during the second day of a key Com-
munist Party Central Committee meeting, the garment workers in Zyrar-
dow, near Warsaw, said their occupation of plants would not end "until we
see an improvement of food supplies in the shops.
Refueling for shuttle begins
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.- NASA technicians began the week-long
operation of fueling the space shuttle Columbia yesterday in preparation for
the reusable spacecraft's second launch Nov. 4, space agency officials said.
Roland Raab, spokesman for the National Aeronautics and Space Ad-
ministration, said technicians entered the orbiter at noon and began oooling
one of the propellants, nitrogen tetroxide; to 60 degrees Fahrenheit to reduce
the chance that fumes would escape.
"Everything so far is on time," Raab said. "We're on schedule for a Nov. 4
launch."
Raab said workers in protective suits entered the orbiter to cool the
poisonous liquid. "The major reason is to make it (the nitrogen tetroxide)
denser and thus it will fume less," Raab said. During an attempt to fuel the
orbiter on Sept. 22, nitrogen tetroxide spilled down the side of the shuttle,
forcing a month's delay in Columbia's second mission.

0

with

us.

And save on.
Texas Instruments Calculators.

We're having a
Grand-Opening Celebration
all this week for our
New Electronics Showroom
And we re celebrating
with specials for everyone.

Come in and register for our
Thanksgiving Give-Away
Winners will receive a
TI-55 list $40.00
or a
TI-59 list $250.00
or a
HP-4lCV list $325.00

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* Drawing will be held
Friday, Nov.

at the showroom
27, 1981

I

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Specigls
for the kids

Little Professor (6 only)'. .,....lst $15. .... .
DataMan (50 only).... .......list $25. ........
Mr. Challenger (60 only)........list $40...... .
Spelling B (30 only).. ......list $40........ .
Specials for
business & finance

.$10.95
.$17.95
.$27.95
.$27.95

Vol. XCII, No. 27
Saturday, October 10, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.

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TI-Investment
Analyst ............list $65.............$41.95
TI-5015........ ..... list $75.............. .$52.50
TI-5040.... .......list $115...............$60.95
TI-5213 ............list $160............... $98.95
TI-5215 ............ list $175..............$107.95
TI-5221 .............list $250..............$152.50

Specials for0
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TI-1890 .. . . . list $24.95 ....... .
TI-Programmer ........list $65.00.... .
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TI-55-II ............ $50.00 ....... ..
TI-58C .. ........list $115.00....... .
TI-59 . .........list $250.00 ..........
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All TI-58/59 Speciality Packettes - $8.00
*Special price plus a $20 rebate from TI
and a FREE module from Ulrich's
Specials
for the home

We'll be open Friday 'til 9 p.m.
Stop in, see our new digs and take advantage
of these and other specials tQo
numerous to mention here.

News room: (313) 764.0552. 76DAILY, Sports desk
764-0557, Display advertising. 764-0554. Billing 7640550.
Editor in chief.,.....,............ SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor ............... JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor ...................ULORENZO BENET
News Editor .......... ....... ..... , DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors...........CHARLES THOMSON
KEVIN TOTTIS
Sport? Editor...................MARK MIHANOVIC
Associate Sports Editors ........... GREG DeGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
Chief Photographer ............. PAUL ENGSTROM
PHOTOGRAPHERS- Jackie Bell, Kim Hill, Deborah
Lewis. Mike Lucas, Brian Masck.
ARTISTS: Robert Lence, Jonathan Stewart. Richard
Walk, Norm Christiansen.
ARTS STAFF: Jane Carl, Mark Dighton, Adam Knee,
Pam Kramer, Gail Negbour
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, Beth Allen, Julie Barth,
Carol Choltron, Andrew Chapman, Lisa Crumrine,
Debi Davis, Ann Marie Fazio, Pom Fickinger, Denise
Franklin. Joyce Frieden, Mork ,Gindin, Julie Hinds,
Steve Hook, Kathy Hoover, Mindy Layne, Jennifer Mil-
ler, Dan Oberrotman, Janet Rae, David Spok, Fannie
Weinstein, Barry Witt.

764052. Circulation. 764.0558. Classified odverfising
SPORTS STAFF
SPORTS STAFF: Barb Borker, Randy Berger, Mark
Borowdki, Joe Chapelle, Martha Crall, Jim Dworman.
John Fitzpatrick, Larry Freed, Chuck Hortwig, Chuck
Joffe, John Kere, Larry Mishkin, Dan Newman, Ron
Pollack, Jeff Quicksilver, Steve Schaumberger,
Sarah Sherber, James Thompson, Kent Walley, Chris
Wilson, Bob Wojnowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager.... RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager .......BARB FORSLUND
Operations Manager ....... SUSANNE KELLY
Dsplay Manager MARY ANN MISIEWICZ
Classifieds Manager............. DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager MICHAEL YORICK
Assistant Disalav Manager.......... NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals Manager ............ SUSAN RABUSHKA
Circulation Manager .... . ..... KIM WOODS
Sales Coordinator E ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Liz Altman, Hope Borron, Lindsay
Bray, Joe Broda, Alexander DePillis, Alda Eisenstadt,
Susan Epps, Wendy Fox, Sandy Frcko. Pamela Gould,
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Beth Kovinsky, Barbara Miner, Caryn Notisse, Felice
Oper, Jodi Pollock,.'Michael Savitt. Michael
Seltzer, Karen Silverstein, Sam-Slaughter. Adrienne.
Strombi, Nancy Thompson, Jeffrey Voigt.

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TI-1010(20only).........list $14.00 . ....... .
TI-1031 ...........lst $12.95 .......... .
TI-1750-III ...........list $15.95 ........ .
TI-1890 .. .........list $24.95......... .
Electronic Digital
Thermostat (8 only)........list $160.00.. .. .

.$10.75
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PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
MTTF S S MT WT F S S MT W T FS S MT WT FS
SETEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
1 2 3 1 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
101112 4 6 7 8 9 10 8 1011121314 6 101112
13 1516 7718 19 11 1314 15 16717 15 1718 19 20 21
20 ~ 12 24 2526 r 18 20 21 22 2324 22 .4 24 25 06?;[ 0
1982
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL

Celebration

sale ends Saturday,

Oct. 24,

1981.

A ~

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