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October 15, 1981 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-15

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Page 6-Thursday, October 15, 1981-The Michigan Daily

THE FOLKS EXPECT YOU TO

Imogen Cunningham's

WRITE HOME ONCE IN A WHILE...
b
1 *
HERE'S AN EASIER WAY
TO WRITE HOME- SIX DAYS A WEEK!
"II
Dear Mom and Dad:
* I thought you might like to know what school is like for me every day. The Michigan [
* Daily is the University's daily newspaper. It brings the most complete coverage of

j Campus news six days a week . . . not to mention community, state and national
1 coverage, a Sunday magazine; sports, features and editorials, and more!;
1 Just fill out this form and mail, with your check to:1
1 The Michigan Daily/420 Maynard/Ann Arbor, MI 48109 I
That way we'll have lots to discuss about living in Ann Arbor, and my days at
1 Michigan, the next time I come home.
1 1
LEAVE BLANK Yes, I would like to s'u b s c r i b e to THE LEAVE BLANK
MICHIGAN DAILY. I agree to be billed later 1
1 - " (pre-payment necessary for subs. outside of 1
1 L..Ann Arbor, Mich.)
ONE SEMESTER - TWO SEMESTERS __ PERMANENT I
(automatically renewed
yI- each term) 1
I is-------~~~------------------------
1 SCHEDULE OF PRICES: I For Circulation Dept. Use Only
1 $12 SEPT. thru APRIL (2 Semesters)
$13 by Mail outside Ann Arbor I E Stencil Typed
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-IAmount Due $
1' I Date Started 1
(Please Print) Lost Name First Middle Initial ICode 3...
I I.D. No. Phone No._(circle one)

smouldering

eroticism

'4

By Jenny Carlson

focus, Pictorials
return it to pu
sharp, straightfo

F YOU THINK photography as art Cunningham's
is superficial, think again. Look, for simple. Decepti
instance, at Imogen Cunningham's although her ima
"The Unmade Bed" (1957). Sure it's a asked to look b
commonplace sight, but with some message.
sensuously rippled sheets and a few That the plain
hairpins (those Victorian symbols of tant than the d
surrender), Cunningham has created ningham's art i
an image of smouldering eroticism. these plant forn
Such is the nature of her work. light as her o
"Imogen Cunningham: Plant Forms camera, she mol
and Nudes" is a small show in the small nearly three dim
space of a dentist's office-turned-Duffy Blossom" (192
Gallery, located just above Kresge's at Georgia O'Keefe
317 S. State. But the gallery has a supple petals ent
unique charm, and its Art Deco interior were insects.
puts these images-most of which date The equally or
from the '20s and '30s-right at home. blends well as th
The show runs through October 28, and image. The mag
is a must-see for admirers and skeptics "Nude" (1939) i
alike, shadows and sens
Educated . in Chemistry and harmony is most
Photography at The University of in the pairing of
Washington and later in Berlin, Cun- and "Two Callas
ningham soon settled in California. the emphasis is
There she banded together with the compositions em
likes of photographers Edward Weston the flesh-like pet
and Ansel Adams to{ form the now turing.
famous Group f/64. Their aim was to But just when t
rescue photography from the soft- of her images e
in MAPLE VI LAGE SHP CTR
, * MON - FRI $ 2 tiI 6 PM
Robert DeNiro -WILLIAM HURT
_KATHLEENTURNER
Robert Duvall B Y

style of the 1910s and
re imagery through
rward prints.
subjects and style are
vely so, in fact, for
ages are direct, we are
eyond the given for a
image is more impor-
doctored one in Cun-
s highly apparent in
ms and nudes. Using
nly tool beyond the
ids the image until it's
ensional. In "Magnolia
25), the dramatic,
e-like close-up of the
ices viewers as if they
ganic form of the nude
e exhibit's companion
nificant pear-shape of
s exalted by smooth
suous line. This perfect
successfully conveyed
"Two Sisters" (1928)
" (1929). In both works
on the sensual, their
aulating each other in
als and delicate sculp-
he inherent sensuality
merges and becomes
375 N. MAPLE
769-1300
SAT-SUN S2 ti 3PM

1.00
3:10
- 5:15
7:20
9:30
DAILY
BARGAIN
H 1 45
NOR415
NO 7.00
ITU ES. 91

United Artists1

IAI~A4AtU Two hours of
nwnstop thrills.
1:15 3:20 4Q%4
0 LOST AR
709:50 ® A PARAMOU

familiar, Cunningham tosses in a few
photographs with a completely opposite
treatment. In "Agave Design I"
(1920s), the extremely sharp, angular
points of the agave plant pierce the
work so dynamically that it is anything
but natural. "Triangles" (1928) is par-
ticularly intriguing in the placement of
a form so voluptuous as the female
nude in a strictly geometric context.
Honorable mention for self-
contradiction, however, goes to "Leaf
Pattern" (1929). Though the image of
this silhouetted lead could hardly be
more direct, the sharply contrasted
colors and serrated edges come across
abstractly, at first glance resembling
the Fauvist cut-outs of Matisse.
The most significant of the remaining
prints are those from Cunningham's
early days of Pictorialism. "On Mount
Ranier 2" (1915), the best represen-
tative of these, is a haunting landscape
steeped in soft-focus mist. These
images foreshadow her later
works-particularly the photographs in
this show-in that the accented nude
forms was, even then, the highlight.
The exhibit concludes, fittingly, with
two "Self-Portraits" one made in 1913
and the other in 1974, two years before
Cunningham's death. The clear focus of
the later print and the blurred, roman-
tic style of the early one convey almost
ironically that her sharpening of vision
came, rather than went, with age.
If nothing else, Imogen Cun-
ningham's prints should force. some
new readings of old,forms. A second
glance is the very least she deserves.
The show at the Duffy Gallery is open
Tuesday through Friday from noon to
5:30 p.m., and Saturday from 10 a.m. to
5:30 p.m. until October 28.
Blood
knot
(Continued from Page 5)
David Little must be given credit for
trying to make Morris authentic.
However, his character is not conveyed
well. The effort is expressed on his
face, especially when he is alone on,
stage of delivering a lengthy
monologue.
Little, who is not South African, has
trouble with the accent and at times it
sounds Irish. The problems of timing
and the overemphasis of certain words
like "white woman" are probably more
a result of Stephen Wyaman's directing 4
than Little's acting. Morris comes
across as a whining, spoiled progeny
and although he acts like a child, he is
definitely an adult character. He has
traveled and is aware that there is
more to life than living in a shack, yet
he is unable to characterize these ex-
periences and emotions. Little is better
when he and Mokae are conversing, but
the basic elements of his character are
never developed.
Seeing a well-produced version of
The Blood Knot is more than enter-
tainment; it qualifies as a learning ex-
perience. As Fugard said, "Anything
that will get people to think and feel for
themselves, that will stop them (from)
delegating these functions to the
politicians, is important to our survival.
Theater has a role to play in in this."
Do a Tree
a Favor:
Recycle

Your Daily

.Z-

E 5rJ Gallo Winery
presents
"The History Of The
Marketing Of Wine"
Friday, October 16-4 P.M.
Wolverine Room
School of Business Administration

A

IN

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