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October 14, 1981 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-14

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday,;October 14, 1981-Page 9
SPORTS OF THE DAILY

9N*t W~eekRy DigeMt

Blue Stickers bu

SOFTBALL
The following accounts are of the 'A' championship for the various in-
tramural divisions.
RESIDENCE HALL
Elliott House 7, Allen Rumsey 4: Elliott took a big lead early in this contest
and then staved off a Rumsey rally to win its third consecutive residence hall
softball championship.
Elliott, which has now won 18 games in a row, scored four runs in the first
inning when Mike Gass, Jay Gittles, Matt Stanczyk and Roger Smith all
crossed home plate. Gass, Gary Gentile and Stanczyk accounted for the rest
of the Elliott runs in the third inning.
Lonnie Grantham scored for Rumsey in the fourth frame, while Paul Chiu,
Greg Marsh and Andy Krell each tallied a run to narrow the Elliott lead to 7-
4.-F
FRATERNITY
Phi Gamma Delta 12, Sigma Nu 5: Sigma Nu got off to a good start by
scoring two runs in the top half of the first inning, but then the roof fell in. In
the bottom of the first, Kevin Gilligan, Matt Russert and Gordy Erley each
scored to put Phi Gamma Delta on top 3-2.
Then in the second frame, Phi Gamma Delta blew the game wide open.
When the stanza finally ended, Phi Gamma Delta had notched eight runs,
one each by Russert, Erley, Bob Pierce, Wayne Nettnay, Phil Schucter, Tom
Perrine,Bill Ekhorn and Stew Greenlee.
GRADUATE/FACULTY/STAFF
pall Burnishers 6, Cementicles 3: The Cementicles scored three runs in
the first inning, but thereafter their bats remained silent.
Tim Ward led off the Cementicles' first frame with a triple and scored
when Nick Paron followed with a sacrifice fly. Nick Nahernak then stepped
to the plate and matched Ward's triple. Nehernak scored on Mike Girskis
double. Girskis moved to third when Rob Rosseau doubled and scored on a'
Fred Slete sacrifice fly.
The Ball Burnishers narrowed the gap in the bottom of the first when Mar-
ty Werschky and Dennis Fasbinder scored.
Jim Yanoschik walked with one out in the sixth stanza and went on to score
the tying run for the Ball Burnishers.
With two out in the bottom of the eighth inning, Yanoschik won the game
for the Ball Burnishers with a three run homer.
The IM Digest relates briefly the activities of the Michigan intramural a
program during the previous week. This week's information was
compiled by Daily sports writer Ron Pollack.

By JAMES THOMPSON
The Michigan women's field hockey
team, led by freshman Lisa Schofield's
two goals, was finally able to generate
some offense as the Wolverines out-
scored the Falcons from Bowling
Green, 5-3, yesterday at Ferry Field.
The Falcons took an early lead as
Doris Acerbo scored the first of her
three goals, when she moved past
Wolverine freshman goalie Jonnie Lee
Terry.

a ?C¢. y'
F

put the game out of reach for the
Falcons.
ACERBO SCORED two more times
for the Falcons, but the Michigan
defense held on to their lead.
Late in the game Schofield scored her
second goal of the game as the
Wolverines won 5-3.
Michigan outshot Bowling Green for
the game with 24 shots on goal to the
Falcons' 10, and now move into the Big
Ten tournament this Friday against
Iowa, in Iowa City.
"Iowa will be the toughest (opponent
we've played)," said stickers' coach
Candy Zientek, "but the way we played
them before, I expect a close game."
Spikers lose heartbreaker
Central Michigan came back from a
seven point deficit in the fifth and final
game of the match to win 15-13 and
defeat the Michigan Volleyball team
three games to two last night at the
CCRB.
It was a tight match all the way, with
momentum shifting back and forth
between the two teams. Central took
the first game 165-13 holding off a
Michigan comeback.
THE SECOND game was extremely
close with neither team leading by
more than two points. Eventually
the Michigan women finally pulled it
out, 17-15. After Central won the third
game 15-10, it looked as though the
Chippewas would run away with the
match.
Michigan struck back in the fourth
game, however, thrashing the Chip-
pewas 15-2. Coach Sandy Vong said
there was a reason for the turn around.
"We really have to study the other team
and adjust," he said.

m Faic
AFTER THE adjustments in the
fourth game, Michigan carried the
momentum into the final game. They
looked like winners as they ran off eight
straight points early in the game to
grab a 10-3 lead. The Chippewas then
showed why they are one of the top
teams in the state as they grabbed 12 of
the last 15 points to pull out the match.
"I feel like we let the fish get out of
the net,"said Vong following the loss.
"They (Michigan) were kind of waiting
for the other team to make the mistake
rather than taking it to 'em."

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ons, 5-3
The loss dropped Michigan's record
to 22-7, while Central Michigan raised
their's to 23-7 on the year.
"I think the team as a whole is im-
proving," said Vong. "(with) two poin-
ts difference (in the final game) you
really can't say much."
Michigan faces Windsor October 21,
and then prepare for the Big Ten tour-
nament October 23-24, at Minneapolis.
"We feel we'll be lucky in the Big Ten if
we can come out in the top four," said
Vong.HI
--CHUCK HART WIG,

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Ditchendorf
.. notches goal

BUT THE Falcon lead did not last
long as Wolverine junior Marty Maugh
scored to tie the game. Three minutes
later sophomore Heidi Ditchendorf
scored on a corner hit-in after a Sara
Forrestel pass to give the Wolverines a
2-1 lead.
Later in the first half Forrestel
scored on an unnassisted goal which
gave Michigan a 3-1 lead at the half.
The Wolverines did not let up in the
second half. Schofield gave the
Wolverines a 4-1 lead with a goal which

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o By DAN NEWMAN
The lost sheep has returned to its
flock as the University of Minnesota
announced last week it will affiliate its
women's athletic program with the Big
Ten Conference.
Minnesota becomes the tenth mem-
ber of the conference to accept the
guidelines and recommendations made
by a special Big Ten Task Force con-
cerning conference reorganization.
This action was previously approved by
the Council of Ten which is made up of
university presidents.
The other nine members voted to af-
filiate at the joint Big Ten meetings
August 3-5. Why did Minnesota hesitate
in joining the women's Big Ten Con-
ference?
A spokesman for the Big Ten, Charles
Henry, explained. "Minnesota is on a
quarter system," Henry said. "And the
feeling was that such a change required
that all the faculty senate vote on the
proposal."
According to Henry, however, Min-
nesota's women's athletic department
realized that it must accept the
guidelines and affiliate with the Big
Ten's nine other members by October
15 in order to receive certain
"privileges."
The women's program will be set up
along similar lines as the men's
program, explained Henry. "We are
very hopeful and we have been adver-
tising throughout the country for an
assistant commissioner who. will work
with (Big Ten Commissioner) Wayne
Duke, aiming specifically at the

Minnesota
development of the women's
program."
Like the men's team competition, the
women's teams will have twelve sport
championships ranging fromsfield
hockey and basketball to gymnastics

and tennis.
"To have a sport championship, you
need six teams participating," com-
mented Henry, "and you must remem-
ber that some of these teams are par-
ticipating through the AIAW for some
sports. We're only concerned with the
women's Big Ten teams playing in the
Big Ten sports."
The women's conference will also
have all-conference and all-academic
teams which will be based on the same
criterion as those used for the men's
selections.
"The women's committee made
recommendations at the last meeting
(September 28) concerning the 1982-
1983 season which will be considered at
the December meeting," said Henry.

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atrocities.
4:15 FRIDAY - A DISCUSSION OF UNITED STATES POLICIES WITH GARY MacEO1N
U.S. INTERVENTION-
SALVADORAN REFUGEES
WASHINGTON SEES THE ESCALATING REVOLUTIONARY VIOLENCE IN CENTRAL AMERICA AS A
SYMBOLIC WAR BETWEEN EAST AND WEST, TO BE FOUGHT TO THE LAST CENTRAL AMERICAN.
IGNORING THE VITAL NEEDS OF THE PEOPLE IT COUNTS ON MASSIVE INPUT OF SOPHISTICATED
WEAPONS PLUS THE TRAINING AND EXPANSION OF LOCAL MILITARY MACHINES TO RE-
ESTABLISH ORDER WITHOUT JUSTICE.
RESULTS ALREADY ACHIEVED INCLUDE THE KILLING, TORTURE, AND DISAPPEARANCE OF
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