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September 10, 1981 - Image 42

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-10

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Page 2-B-Thursday, September 10, 1981-The Michigan Daily
Running the 'U'
in dicult times

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Meet the Regents

,

By BARRY WITT
Although some students may not
know such a body ever exists, the Board
of Regents has a great deal of influence
on their lives, establishing the formal
policies followed by the University.
Much of the Regents' monthly agenda
is filled with regular reports and
requests from the vice-presidents,
rarely questioned by the board. But at
almost every meeting, some issue
arises to spur lengthy presentations,
anki/or debate among the Regents, ad-:
mmnistratyors, and occasionally studen-
ts.
THE BOARD studies most carefully
the University's financial con-
siderations, leaving the majority of
academic concernsto the ad-
ministration and individual schools and
colleges.
The Regents do, however, have the
ultimate responsibility for all affairs of
the University; and hold the authority
to make substantial changes when they
deem it necessary.
Because their positions are advisory,
the Regents leave most routine
decision-making to the administration,
approving the overwhelming majority
of recommendations brought to their
attention each month.
ALL OF THE Regents hold other full-,
time jobs and meet as a board only on
the third Thursday and Friday of every
month; but they need to do a con-
siderableamount of homeowrk on up-
coming issues.
Thirty minutes are set aside at each
meeting for comments from members
of the University community who wish
to address the Regents. Participants
must sign up for time at the meeting in
advance, and they are alloted five
minutes for their presentations.

Some issues, such as University in-
vestments with companies that studen-
ts are not especially fond of, receive
much attention from the public
speakers. Other important questions,
including sizeable hikes in tuition, are
often left unaddressed by the public.
THREE YEARS ago, a large group of
students disrupted a Regents meeting
to protest University investments with
companies involved in South Africa.
Last February, a number of students
protested the possibility of investments
in defense industries.
Students also addressed budget cuts
in recent months, although the Board
was not directly involved in decisions
on the cuts.
The Board usually listens attentively
to public opinion, but its members are
not easily swayed by the opinions
presented. They tend to rely more
heavily on the opinions of the Univer-
sity president and vice-president.
In some cases, however, an issue
brought to their attention by the public,
prompts swift action. Last January, an
Ann Arbor resident informed the Board
that the state might open a halfway
house for prisoners near North Cam-
pus; the Regents quickly passed a
resolution condemning the plan.
Members of the Board are elected in
statewide elections to eight-year terms.
University President Harold Shapiro
presides over the eight member Board,
but does not vote.
Two women, Sarah Power (D-Ann
Arbor) and Nellie Varner (D-Detroit),
two blacks, Varner and James Waters
(D-Muskegon), hold seats on the Board.
Only one Republican currently serves.
Four of the Regents are lawyers, and
every member of the Board plays an
important role in his or her state
political party.

Deane Baker
Baker won re-election to the board
last November and is often the most
vocal member of the Board, with a par-
ticularly watchful eye toward the
destination of University funds.
details of University affairs.

Gerald Dunn
A former state senator, Dunn is in his
13th year on the board. The 40-year-old
Democrat from Lansing is a lobbyist
for the state's schools.

Sarah Power
Power. 46, worked in the Carter ad-
ministration as deputy assistant
secretary of state for human rights and
social affairs. A resident of Ann Arbor,
Power often speaks on minority issues.

Nellie Varner
Elected to her first term last Novem-
ber, this Detroit Democrat is a partner
in Strather & Varner Properties, a real
estate brokerage firm.
. . .
T

Paul Brown
The son of former U.S. Senator Pren-
tiss Brown, this 46-year-old Petoskey
Democrat is a graduate of the Univer-
sity Law School.

Robert Nederlander
A 13-year veteran of the Board, 48-
year-old Nederlander is a lawyer from
Birmingham. This Democrat is often
concerned with the University's long-
term obligations.

Thomas Roach James Waters

Perhaps the hardest worker on the
board, this 52-year-old Saline Democrat
comes prepared to the monthly
meetings to question some of the finer
details of University affairs.

This 41-year-old Democrat from
Muskegon is often quiet at Regents
meetings, but has opinions widely
respected in the University community.

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Prestigious 'U'faculty
attracts quality students

ME

By LOU FINTOR
A recent study by Colurbia Univer-
sity sociologists Peter Blau and Reb-
beca Margulies showed -that the
University of Michigan faculty is rated
among the top 10 schools in 13 of the 18
professional areas surveyed-the best
overall record of any university in the
country.
"University of Michigan 'faculty is
consistently rated among the best in the
nation," said University information
services officer Wono Lee.
FACED WITH OVERALL cutbacks
in state funding, University officials
maintain that they do not anticipate a
decline in the quality of education.
"We expect the quality of the
teaching faculty to remain at least the
same," Lee said. "We will never

sacrifice the quality of education here."
In another .survey conducted by
Everett Ladd and Seymour Lipsett, 15
of the University's departments were
among the top 11,nationally in 19 fields
surveyed.
"A RATING OF Graduate
Programs," published by the American
Council on Education in 1970 ranked 12
U-M departments among the top 5
nationally, while 23 departments
ranked among the top 10 in the 36 areas
surveyed.
In the Ladd-Lipsett study, various
University departments that rated.
among the top 11 are: Psychology;
Philosophy; Music; Political Science;
Engineering; Law; Sociology; Biology;
History; Economics; Foreign
Languages; Mathematics and

A MICHIGAN
ST UDEN T
The Michigan Student Assembly, YOUR student government on the Univer-
sity of Michigan, consists of representatives elected by the student body
each year in April. MSA strives to work for you and with you on issues of
concern to student life, and needs your input to effectively represent your
concerns. Openings to be filled this fall exist on the following standing com-
mittees:
-Academic Affairs
-Budget Priorities
-Communications
-Student Organizations
-Legislative Relations
-Minority Affairs
-Permanent Interviewing
Special Prolects

Statistics; Business; and English.
The School of Public Health and the
Department of Library Science were
both rated number one in the nation by
the survey. The University's School of
Dentistry tied for first place with the
University of North Carolina's dental
school.
ACCORDING TO THE various sur-
veys, the University has one of the best
combinations of distinguished faculty,
curriculum, and -facilities in the con-
try.
Blau and Margulies noted that the
size of a university's library is substan-
tially correlated to the reputation of
nearly all types of professional schools.
"A university's large library is in-
dicative of a strong academic climate
in which professional schools flourish. 4
Such a climate provides incentives for
mobilizing whatever resources are
necessary to improve a school's quality
and it's reputation," they wrote.
THE UNIVERSITY HAS TWO major
libraries, the grad and undergrad, and
each department maintains a substan-
tial collection of books and periodicals
pertaining to its field.
According to Hawe's "Compreheh-
sive Guide to Colleges," the University
is rated tops in the state in areas sueh
as social achievement, admission
policy, social prestige, and faculy
salaries.
Among nine midwestern schools
rated by Thawes, including North-
western, the University of Chicago, and
Minnesota University, the University
again comes out on top.
IN FACT, THE University was
ranked "at least comparable" to subh

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