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October 10, 1981 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-10

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v

TtAP Photo
Big oot
The six Marines who raised the American flag on Iwo Jima on Feb. 19, 1944, symbolically wore big shoes during one of
World War II's most heroic moments. Now, their shoes are portrayed in giant size in the plaster cast of the Iwo Jima
monument. A truck caravan carrying the dismantled cast of the six-story monument stopped at Little Rock Thursday
for a Marine ceremony.

Wholesale inflation at

WASHINGTON (AP)-nflation at the
wholesale level hit its lowest rate in
more than three years last month, with
stable food costs and falling car prices
holding the overall rise to an annual
pace of just 2.2 percent, the government
reported yesterday. ,
The only clotd in the report wasn't
very dark: a modest 0.6 percent mon-
thly increase in energy prices. That
was the first such increase after four
months of decline.
AND THE REPORT'S figures on food
prices at the earliest stages of produc-
tion strongly indicated that there will
be more good new for shoppers in
coming months.

September's seasonally adjusted 0.2
percent gain in the Producer Price In-
dex for finished goods would mean a 2.2
percent yearly increase if wholesale
prices rose at the same pace for 12
straight months.
The September figure, down from
August's 0.3 percent, was the lowest
since the 0.1 percent increase in August
1978.
THE PPI, compiled by the Labor
Department, has now risen 0.4 percent
or less in each of the past five months,
and analysts are saying there is no in-
dication of any big surge before the end
of the year.'
The index has risen at an annual rate

3=year low
of 7.6 percent so far this year, well
below last year's 11.8-percent rate.
Another principal government in-
flation measure, the Consumer Price
Index, has been running slightly higher
than the Producer Price Index, but so
far it also is below its 1980 level of 12.4
percent.
The PPI, which measures the prices
of goods at an earlier stage of delivery,
is often a good gauge of the direction
consumer prices will move.
A number of analysts have noted that
there have been few major labor con-
tracts negotiated this year, and they
say big settlements next year could
send prices rising higher.

/(I....iurrljUarZI)i tPUIE0

Business
leaders see
interest
rate drop
HOT SPRINGS, Va. (AP)- Top U.S.
business leaders agreed with predic-
tions by corporate economists yester-
day that interest rates will fall in the
next 15 months, but they were divided
on how much relief is coming for the
sluggish economy.
A report by economists for 20 major
U.S. corporations predicted short-term
interest rates would decline two per-
centage points by the eddof this year
and perhaps another 2 points by the end
of 1982.
BUT WALTER Wriston, chairman of
Citicorp, the nation's largest bank-
holding company, and Reginald Jones,
former chairman of General Electric,
said they expected the prime lending
rate at major banks to fall to between 9
percent and 10 percent by the end of
1982. The current rate ranges between
18.5 percent and 19 percent.
The forecasters predicted the
economy would show growth in the next
15 months and that inflation would con-
tinue to wind down.
"However, the rate of growth will be
relatively moderate . .. and-despite
their declines-interest rates, inflation
and unemployment will still be
relatively high," said Charles Brown,
chairman of the American Telephone &
Telegraph Co., who delivered the
report.
THE REPORT was presented to the
Business Council, a group of about 100
top executives of major corporations
that is holding its annual closed-door
meeting with top government officials
at the Homestead resort in Hot Springs.
The Business Council was formed
about 50 years ago to advise gover-
nment on corporate issues.
THE ECONOMISTS' forecast was
less optimistic about economic growth
than projections made in July by the
Reagan administration. They said:
-Inflation, as measured by the Con-
sumer Price Index, will fall from 12.5
percent last year to 9.5 percent in 1981
and 8.2 percent in 1982. That compared
to administration forecasts of 8.6 per-
cent this year and 6.2 percept next year.
-The inflation-adjusted gross
national product, a measure of all
goods and services produced by the
economy, will rise 2 percent in 1981 and
nearly 4 percent in 1982. The ad-
ministration estimated 'a 2.5 percent
rise this year andma 5.5 percent gain in
1982.
-Unemployment will remain at 7.5
percent through the final months of this
year, declining to 7 percent by the end
of 1982.
B omb
kills
PLO
chief
ROME, Italy, (UPI) - The infor-
mation chief of the Palestine Liberation
Organization was killed yesterday by a
bomb exploded under his bed in one of
Rome's most luxurious hotels.
Police said it was a highly professinal

assassination. Majed Abu Sharar, chief
of the PLO's public relations depar-i
tment, died when the bomb went off
shortly before 1 a.m., 8 p.m. EDT Thur-
sday in his room on the fourth floor of
the Flora hotel on Romes tourist-famed
Via Veneto.
A PLO spokesman blamed Israel for
the attack, calling Abu Sharar a victim
of the "homicidal madness of Israeli
terrorists."
However, a hard-line Palestinian
group in Beirut claimed responsibility
for the assassination, saying it kil)ed
Abu Sharar because he had "diverg'd"
from the radical line and had become
too moderate.
The bomb, placed beneath his bed,
started a fire that burned Abu Sharar's
corpse beyond recognition and forced
scores of tourists and other hotel guests
to flee their rooms in nightclothes.

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Rally in Lansing protests
high interest rates
LANSING- About 250 people gathered yesterday to protest the nation's
high interest rates at a rally, ironically, sponsored by some of the groups:
rying to repeal the state's usury laws.
Conference participants were warned by a widely booed U.S. Rep. Donald
Albosta (D-Mich.) that interest rates will not come down unless citizens are
willing to give up the recently enacted federal tax cut.
U.S. Sen. Donald Riegle (D-Mich.) accused the Reagan administration of
"monetary madness" and said it could control high interest rates now
through use of credit laws.
Khomeini calls for Islamic
revolution in Egypt
BEIRUT, Lebanon- Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini presiding at the
swearing-in yesterday of Iran's new president, called on tie Egyptian people
to overthrow their government and replace it with an Islamic republic,
Tehran Radio reported.
It said the patriarch of Iran's Islamic revolution, referring to Tuesday's
assassination of President Anwar Sadat, urged Egyptians to defy the state
of emergency declared by "the dead pharaoh's successors."
Khomeini said Egyptians "should not be afraid of martial law or a state of
emergency. They should ignore it, like the Iranians when they defied martial
law and surged into the streets to defend Islam."
U.S. scientists win Nobel prize
STOCKHOLM, Sweden- Two Harvard researchers'who showed that sight
stimulation in infancy is tied to future vision and a California professor who
demonstrated a kind of division of labor in the brain wog the 1981 Nobel prize
in medicine yesterday.
Canadian-born David Hubel, 55, who is a naturalized American, and his
Swedish colleague at Harvard, Torsten Wiesel, 57, will share the honors and.
half the $180 000 equivalent cash award with Dr. Roger Sperr, a 68-year-old
American who is a professor at California Institute of Tchnology,
The award announced here by the Karolinska Medical Institute Nobel
Assembly was the first in this year's series of Nobel prizes to be announced
and marked the eighth consecutive year that American recipients have
dominated the award in medicine or physiology.
Last year's medical award went to three immunologists-Venezuela born
Harvard professor Baruj Benacerraf, retired Maine researcher George
Snell and French scientist Jean Dausset-all of whose work was important
in the field of genetics, organ transplants and the fight against many chronic
diseases.
Judge revokes light sentence
for gang of rapists
DEDHAM, Mass.- A judge who was assailed for suspending the senten-
ces of five rapists revoked the suspensions and $5-a-week fines yesterday
and gave the men another chance to stand trial for the assault on a former
beauty queen.
Superior Court Judge Herbert Abrams decided to revoke the suspensions
after four days of outcry, iicluding criticism by Massachusetts' Gov. Ed-
ward King, who said he was "outraged" by the light sentences for the men,
who had pleaded guilty.
Abrams, after meeting with lawyers, told a packed courtroom he had
originally given the suspended 3-to-5 year prison sentences and $500 fines
because, "I felt imposition of a suspended state prison sentence could be
more reasonable under all the circumstances."
The fines were to have been paid at $5 a week.
The case involves the gang rape of a 38-year-olf Whitman woman on Jan.
23, 1980. Abrams had earlier defended his decision by saying the victim,
identified in police records as a former Miss Ohio, was of questionable
character.
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
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News room: (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY, Sports desk, 764-0562, Circulation, 764-0558, Classified advertising

A

d

4

IN BRIEF

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:+.
8:30 .a.m.-Holy Communion in.the
Chapel.
30 and 11:00 a.m .-Morning Wor-
shilpin the Sanctuary:
Sermon for Oct. 11-"What About the
Wrath of God?" by Dr. Donald B.
Strobe.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
End 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at 7:15
p.m._
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directors:.
Rose McLean and Carol Bennington
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
Service of Worship:
Sunday 9:30and 11:00a.m.
: Student Fellowship meets at 5:30
Em.
-Wednesday: Bible Study, 8:45 p.m.
Thursday: Breakfast, 8:00 a.m.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of then
Christian Reformed Church
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
6:00 p.m. Evening Worship:
7:30 p.m. Community Groups.
Wednesday:
10:00 p.m. Evening Prayers.

01

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
(The Campus Ministry
of the LCa-ALC-AELC)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 10:30 a. m.
Wednesday 7 00 p.m. Choir practice.
o . - * * *
NEW GRACE APOSTOLIC CHURCH
632 N. Fourth Ave.
Rev. Avery Dumas Jr., Pastor {
9:45 a.m. Sunday School.
11:45 Morning Worship
4:00p m. Young People's Service.
Bible Study-Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.
For rides call 761-1530
* * *
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH and
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
FOUNDATION
502 East Huron 663-9376
Jitsuo Morikawa, Pastor
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship. Child
care provided.
Oct. 11: "Gospel for Family and
Children," by Rev. Morikawa.
11:00 a.m.-Church School. Classes
for all ages. Class for undergraduates.
Class for graduates and faculty.
Also:
Choir Thursday 7:00 p.m., John Reed
director; Janice Beck, organist.
Student Study Group. Thurs., 6:00
p.m.
Support group for bereaved students,
alternate Weds. 7 p.m.
11:00 Brunch, second Sunday of each
month.
Ministry Assistants: Nadean Bishop,
Terry Ging, Barbara Griffin, Jerry
Rees..

UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 South Division
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Rev. Steve Bringardner, 761-5941
STUDENT SUNDAY:
9:45 a.m. Study of Basic Christian
Doctrine.
11:00 a.m. David Best, Guest
Preacher.
12:00 noon Italian Meal provided.
1:00 p.m. Concert with Steve and An-
nie Wamberg, an exciting musical,
drama and puppetry duo.
* * *
ANN ARBOR MISSIONARY CHURCH
2118 Saline-Ann Arbor ld. 668-6640
Rev. Marvin L. Claasen, Pastor
10:00 a.m. Sunday School
11 a.m.. 46p.m. Worship Service
7:00 p.m. Wed. Bible Study & Prayer
A Cordial Welcome to All
* * *
ST. MARY'S
STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Mon.-Wed.-5:10 p.m.
Thurs.-Fri.-12: 10p.m.
Sat.-7:00 p.m.
Sun.-8:30 and 10:30 a.m. (Upstairs
and downstairs)1
12 noon and 5 p.m. (upstairs and
downstairs)
North Campus Mass at 9:'30 a.m. in
Bursley Hall (Fall and Winter Terms)
Rite of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5 p.m.
on Friday only; any other time by ap-
pointment.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Sunday Worship 9:15 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Supper: 6:00 p.m.
Bible Study: Sunday-9:15 a.m.,
Wednesday-10 p.m., Thursday-10
p.m.

9
0

'WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?'
Psalm 2:1 and Acts 4:25
After the completion of the conquest of Canaan, The Tabernacle, or
Church, was set up at a place called Shiloh. God blasted and destroyed this
Church, overturned the High Priest's high seat - his neck was broken in the
fall - his two sons were killed in battle along with thirty-four thousand
others; and The Ark, the symbol of God's Presence that contained within it
the tables of stone on which TheA~en Commandments were written "with the
finger of God," this Ark was captured by the pagan Phillistines and put in the
temple of their idol god, Dagon' However, even there, God did not have too
much trouble in looking after His own business without any humn hands to
help - He did use some beastsl in Jeremiah 7:12 God, in threatening the
destruction of the great Temple built by Solomon, said: "But go ye now unto
my place which was In Shiloh, where I set My name at the first, and see what
I did to it for the wickedness of my people Israel! If interested in "going to
Shiloh to see" read the first six chapters of 1st Samuel.
The fame and glory and magnificence of Solomon's Temple spread far and
wide over the earth. The, Queen of Sheba, who doubtless herself was
accustomed to magnificence, came to see and hear. The wonder and glory of
it all just about "knocked her out."
But God got displeased with it, or rather with the way It was being used
and misused, and brought the King of Babylon over to sabotage and burn it
- It is an old and ancient custom to burn churches.
The great Temple in Jerusalem standing when Jesus was on the earth was
forty-six years in being built. "And as He went out of the Temple, one of His
disciples saith unto Him, Master, see what manner of stones and what build-
ings are here! And Jesus answering saith unto him, "Seest thou these great
"__" "__ n - .. ... ___ _"_ aa-&S _ t w . w --- - &k~ #k£3.a h l o

764-0557, Display advertising, 764-0554, Biklng 764.0550.
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I

RELIGIOUS DIMENSIONS
OF CONTEMPORARY CONCERNS:
A SERIES OF LECTURE-DISCUSSIONS
Continuing the Monday Night series of lectures where sub-
jects of current major interest are discussed at The Ecu-
menical Campus Center, 921 Church Street. Everyone is
welcome to these discussions. Beginning at 7:30 p.m.,
with refreshments, the speaker or speakers will make their.
presentation and engage in discussion until 9:00 P.M. _.
COME JOIN US I MONDAY OCTOBER 12th -
Snanker. Dr. Patrick Murrav

1.
PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F2S S M T W T F S WTFS S T W T F S
1-?a48i2 3 1 3 45 67 12 34 5
1011 12 4 6 7 8 9o10 8 101t 121314 6 8 9 oi 12
131 1516 1718 19 i f 13 14 15 16 17 15 17 18 19 2021
2 23 24 25 26 18 2021222324 22 242596-Ef-s
27 29 30 25 27 28 29 30 31
JANUARY1982
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL

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