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October 07, 1981 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-07

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Is

SPORTS
Wednesday, October 7, 1981

The Michigan Daily

Page 8

A

Alumni groups true

Blue at heart

By JOHN KERR
Somewhere, scattered throughout the
world, there are 213,000 people
who have received a degree from the
University of Michigan.
This alumni population is not only one
of the largest, but when it comes to
remembering the University and the
athletic department with financial con-
tributions, one of the most generous.
Each year, various alumni groups
solicit, millions of dollars from
Michigan graduates, much of it ear-
marked for the athletic department,
and much of it for the general student
body.
The most visible and 'well known
alumni groups are such organizations~
as the Graduate'M' Club, (consisting of
former Michigan letter-winners), the
Maize and Blue Club, aiid' the Victors
Club. These groups, all associated with
the athletic department, help keep the
Michigan athletic program one of the
most successfulin the country.
HOWEVER, UNBEKNOWNST to
many people is that these groups do not
support the athletic Drogram by purch-

asing new equipment or directly aiding,
certain Michigan teams. According to
'M' Club president, Dr. Ralph Gibson,
the $7,000-$10,000 that the
organization's 3,000 members con-
tribute annually, is given to the tutorial
fund. The tutorial fund is a service
which provides tutors for student
athletes.r
"(Our purpose is) to make whatever
contributions, tangible or intangible,
we can to Michigan athletics," Gibson
said. "The primary program we con-
tribute to is the tutorial fund. We fell

that for an athlete to really experience
the University, he must be a student-
athlete."
The Victors andMaize and Blue clubs
are somewhat different groups than the
'M'Club. Unlike the latter, these
groups are not actually organized
becomes a member of either club by
simply contributing a given amount of
money; $1,000 to the Victors Club or
$100 *to the Maize and Blue Club.
Currently, there are 692 members of the
Maize and Blue Club and 522 people in
the Victors Club.
THESE TWO GROUPS were started
in 1968 by then-football coach Bump
Elliot. Elliot noticed other schools star-
ting similar fund-raising organizations
and decided it was a good idea for
Michigan.
Assistant Athletic Director, Don
Lund, explained that, the money that
has been raised by the Victors and
Maize ard Blue clubs has gone into the
athletic scholarship fund to help sup-
plement the cost of athletic scholar-
ships.
However, different teams can also
solicit money for the scholarship fund.
IF, SAY, the tennis team wanted to

contact ex-Michigan tennis players in
an attempt to raise money," Lund said,
"that cash would be used to supplement
tennis scholarships."
One sport, baseball, even has its own
club. The Dugout Club, which is not
associated with the University but is a
private organization, was formed about
four months ago by the captain of the
1942 Wolverine baseball team, George
Harms. The organization has about 120
members right now, but more mem-
berships are "coming in daily.

President's Club are numerous. To
become a member of this prestigous
,organization, one must contribute
$10,0(0 to the University. The club has
over 3,100 members and since its incep-
tion in 1961, has contributed over 70
million to the University of Michigan.
INSTEAD OF USING the mail for its
fund-raising, the President's Club
relies on current members to recruit
new people. This process accounted for
over 40% of the people that joined the
club last year.

The groups's functions.are numerous,
and include sponsoring reunions,
publishing the Michigan Alumnus
magazine, running camps around the
world for Michigan alumni, and the
alumni tour program.
"WE DON'T specifically contribute
to the athletic program," Forman said.
"We do no fund raising for them. But,
grups such as the Michigan Alumni
Club of Detroit have made contributions
to Michigan athletics. In general,
though, we are -aligned to the general

0

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'Michigan has always
academically compared
with such institutions as
Harvard, Yale and Stan-
ford. The idea is that when
you come to Michigan you
have a lifetime commit-
ment. The alumni are
proud.'
--Alumni Association
President Bob Forman

A

Association

k~v~1:Ib~I4Lund
516 E. Liberty 994-5350
... favors scholarship clubs
isn't just a Michigan cheer. Now it's.
a Michigan magazine, jam-packed.
with quality features and photos,
statistics, quizzes, quotes and more on ALL U-M athletics.

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For $25 a year you'll get 10 slick magazines
and 20 newsletters. GO BLUE!
Inside Wolverine Sports is endorsed by the
U-M Athletic Department. To subscribe, just
fill out the form below and return it today!

PLEASE PRINT
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for subscriptions

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The club is not only for alumni but
also for friends of, college baseball,"
said Harms. "We want people who like
college baseball and like to watch it."
AT THIS TIME, the Dugout Club is
not involved with fund-raising for
Michigan's badseball team.
"We'd like to get. involved with
raising money for the team if it isn't
against NCAA rules," Harms said.
"But right now we just sponsor an an-
nual banquet for the baseball team at
the end of the year.
One similarity between the four
organizations is their fund-raising,
techniques. All four get most of their
contributions by mail. A letter is sent
Siiout to all prospective members asking
for a donation to the given club.
TWO OTHER MAJOR alumni groups
include the President's Club and the
Alumni Association. These
organizations, although not actually,
. 4 well-known, make very imprtant and
sizeable contributions to the University
and the athletic office.
The purpose of the President's club,
according to Wendell Lyons, who is in
charge of development for the group, is
"to enlist dedicated alumni and sup-
port the University of Michigan with its
resources."'
And indeed, the resources of the

The President's Club, however, is
not primarily concerned with athletics..
In fact, it does not give any money
directly to the athletic department
unless the donor requests it.
"A donor can designate where his
contribution will go," said Lyons.
"Some members do choose to give their
contribution to athletics."
DONATIONS TO the athletic depar-
tment from President's Club members
have, among other things, provided
support for scholarships and needed
equipment.
Most of the donations, however, do
not go to the athletic department. The
money is used to aid all aspects of the
university. The- club takes all the
money that donors have not designated
for a specific department and turns it
over to the Office of Financial Affairs.
From there the Regents and Officers
of the University decide how to use the
donations.
"WE ARE AN organization of alumni
brought together to serve the univer-
sity," said Alumni Association
President Bob Forman.
The 52,000 member organization
solicis money only from its own mem-
bership and last year brought in
$450,000. The money is used to run the
Association's own functions.

EXP DATE

1

NAME
PHONE

City
Make Check Payable To
Overseas -Add $5.00

STATE

ZIP

:GO BLUE! Magazine
P.O. Box 21126
Lansing, MI 48910
PLEASE PRINT.

FOR OFFICE USE

s Pc

F'

I

CN

student body."
However, it is without a doubt that
many of the members of the various
Alumni groups have 'remained close to
the University because of the success of
the Wolverine athletic teams.
"Winning breeds winning," said
assistant. AD Lund. "We have great
alums that feel kindly (toward the
University)., The guys in the (alumni)
clubs just want to show that they ap-
preciate the University."
'M'Club president Gibson agrees.
"SO MANY OF our prominent alumni
are athletes," he said. "(Athletic Direc-
tor) Don (Canham) has maintained a
good relationship with the 'M' Club
the alumni are eager to contribute."W
But a successful athletic program is
not the only reason for the outstanding
rapport between the alumni and the
University.
"Michigan is a very special in-
stitution," said the Alumni
Association's Forman. "Michigan
always academically compares with
such institutions as Harvard, Yale and
Stanford. the idea is that when you
come to Michigan you have lifetime
commitment. The alumni'are proud."
Also, as the President's Club Lyons
points out, this relationship between the
University and the alumni is not
something that .just suddenly came,
about.
"The relationship has been developed
over a number of years,"said Lyons.
"-The executive director of the alumni
Association and myself believe that by
working together .the University profits
and we work very close."
And so it is, the 213;000 Michigan
alumni and the University form a truly
remarlable relationship. One that if
continued, and it most certainly will be,
can only keep on benefitting the
University.

Elliot
... club founder

SI

S IE CE AND POLICY: Cost-Benefit An-
a SS -Its Uses & Limits, is an under-graduate level mini-
course consisting of public lectures and debate by nationally-
known experts from a broad range of disciplines-and fields.
The class meetings will include attendance at the Sci-
ence and Policy Colloquium on Cost-Benefit Analysis be-
ing held on Friday & Saturday, November 13 & 14, 1981.
in addition, four class sessions of lectures will be given.
For more information, call 764-2553 (weekdays, 8:00-noon).
1632 Haven Hall.

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