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October 07, 1981 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-07

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, October7, 1981-Page 5
U.S. alerts mlitary,
world mourns Sadat

WASHINGTON (AP) - Elements of
the U.S. Rapid Deployment Forces and
U. S. warships in the Mediterranean
and Middle East "have been placed on
r increased readiness" in the wake of
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat's
assassination, the Reagan ad-
ministration announced.
The statement was released by the
Pentagon and officials there, speaking
anonymously, indicated the actions
were intended as a warning to Libyan
leader Moammar Khadafy or anybody
else who might be tempted to move
against Egypt and take advantage of
any instability there.
ON CAPITOL HILL,Secretary of
State Alexander Haig jr. was quoted as
saying that Libya may have known in
advance of the assassination.
Sadat was mourned yesterday across
the united States and around the
world, by leaders and common folk, by
Arabs and Jews, as a man of courage,
honor and peace.
In Washington, Reagan said with the
death of Sadat "America has lost a
close friend, the world has lost a great
statesman and mankind has lost a
champion of peace...In a world filled
with hatred, he was a man of hope."
REAGAN CALLED the assassination
AP Photo an act of "cowardly infamy.;."
In Jerusalem, Begin said he hoped
EGYPTIAN PRESIDENTANWAR Sadat shakes hands with U.S. President Jimmy Carter and Israeli Prime Minister the U.S. sponsored peace process with
Menachem Begin, right, on the White House lawn following the signing of a Middle East peace agreement March 26, Egypt would continue "as President
1979. President Sadat was assassinated in Cairo yesterday while viewing a military parade. Sadat would have wanted with all his
Sadat's death threatens peae

heart. I have lost not only a partner in
the peace process but also a friend."
But hard-line Arabs reacted with joy,
firing rifles in the air in Lebanon to
celebrate the death of the man who
signed the peace treaty with Israel.
The Palestine Liberation
Organization's security chief, Abu
Lyad, said he would "shake the hand of
he who pulled the trigger."
MOTORISTS HONKED horns in
jubilation as privately owned radio
stations of the Moslem sector of the
Lebanese capital interrupted programs
to announce news of the shooting.
But in Plains, Ga., where he and
Sadat renewed their personal frien-
dship in informal conversation a few
weeks ago, former President Jimmy
Carter described Sadat as "a man of
great courage" and "a man of
destiny."f
Carter, who engineered the Camp
David accords between Sadat and
Begin in quest of peace in the Middle
East, said their final talks revealed "no
sign of fear" in Sadat and said the slain
Egyptian leader was "admirable in
every possible way."
The value of the dollar, gold and
domestic oil stocks rose yesterday after
Sadat's assassination.
STANDARD OIL CO. Ohio, with large
Alaskan oil reserves, gained $2.50 a
share to end the day at $43.25 on the
New York Stock Exchange.

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DAILY-7:20, 9:20
WED-1:10, 3:10, 5:20,
7:20, 9:20 _

7:20, 9:20
U.-------------

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From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON- The assassination of Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat yesterday cost the United
States its closest Arab ally, threatened the Camp
David peace process and raised the specter of a new
Middle East war.
Middle East experts said Sadat's immediate suc-
cessor, Vice President Hosni Mubarak, will be placed
under increasing pressure from Arab hardliners to
withdraw from the U.S.-sponsored direct
negotiations with Israel.
AT THE SAME time, they said, there is likely to be
a move by some Israeli politicians to halt their with-
drawal from the Sinai, at least until the situation
becomes clearer.
The Egyptian and Israeli anibassadors, however,
predicted yesterday that the Camp David peace
process will survive the assassination of Anwar
Sadat, but both U.S. and diplomatic sources agreed
the death of the Egyptian leader greatly complicates
efforts to devise a lasting Arab-Israeli peace.
Sadat staked his career and his life on the Camp
David accord and on good relations with the United
States." His death raised immediate questions
whether his successors could, or would, follow that
path.

THOUGH SADAT'S successor, vice president
Hosni Mubarak, is considered a staunch friend of the
United States, it simply isn't known whether
government will be strong enough to follow Sadat's
policies-unpopular among Egypt's Arab neighbors
and among Sadat's domestic opponents.
"We are very, very worried," said an Israeli sour-
ce here who didn't want to be identified. "It's a very
severe realization how shaky the situation in Egypt
is, and how shaky the peace is."
There was no mistaking Sadat's influence in
American efforts to establish a firm position in the
Middle East.
"SADAT HAS been the linchpin of our policy," said
a State Department official. "This is a very serious
blow." While Sadat's fate was still in doubt, former
Secretary of State Henry Kissinger said of him, "If
there is an indispensable man in the diplomatic.
process, it is Sadat."
Later Kissinger said: "The Camp David process
was based on fundamental realities. President Sadat
recognized these realities, but he didn't invent them,
and therefore these; realities still exist for us to build
on. I think it would be a terrible mistake for America
now to give way to despair, to think that we cannot go
forward."
Egyptian' Ambassador Ashraf Ghorbal said his

country will continue to pursue peace in the Middle
East and close ties with the United States.
THE EXPERTS SAID the United States will have
to tread a narrow line between showing support for
Mubarak and not trying to shelter him so much that
he can be called an American puppet, according to
Middle East experts.
"If there is a Libyan connection with the shooting,
there will be an Egyptian-Libyan war," said William
Quandt, a former National Security Council. staff
member now with the Brookings Institution.
"In that case," he said, "we (the United States)
will be called on to make some decisions-and very
suddenly."'
Dr. Yahya Sadowski, a Middle East expert at the
Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International
Studies, predicted that at the very least, there now
will be some movement by the Arab states-par-
ticularly in the Persian Gulf-to bring Egypt back in-
to the Arab mainstream, which means moving away
from the Camp David process that. produced the
Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty.
In that case, the experts agreed, the United States
will have to be able to demonstrate that continued
Egyptian participation in the talks with Israel will
produce something tangible.

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Egypt in state of emergency

(Continued from Page 1)

MUI$ARAK SAID Parliament
Speaker Soufi Abu Taleb will serve as
interim president until the elections to
pick a permanent successor-who
without doubt will be Mubarak himself.
Abu Taleb immediately announced a
state of emergency banning all street
demonstrations for a full year.
In Beirut, a group calling itself the
"Independent Organization 'for the
Liberation of Egypt".claimed respon-
sibility for the assassination. Observers
said the group appeared to be connec-
ted to exiled Lt. Gen. Saad EddIin El-
Shazli, a former chief of staff and a
virulent opponent of Sadat and his Mid-
dle East peace policy.
"We can expect much, much tighter
security," one Western diplomat said
after Mubarak announced the state of
emergency.I
THE ATTACKERS were said to have
shouted, "Glory to Egypt" and yelled
"Agents and intruders!" at foreigners
on the reviewing stand watching the
parade.
The reviewing stand was littered with
bullet-riddled armchairs and bloodied

dignitaries thrown into pandemonium
by the attack.
It occurred shortly after 1 p.m.
during a low flyby by jet fighters. Ex-
plosions also were heard, indicating
grenades were thrown in the attack, in
the Cairo district of Nasr, which means
"Victory"'in Arabic. Just before the at-
tack, Sadat was laughing heartily with
his topadvisers while six Egyptian air
force jet fighters thundered overhead.
A PANDEMONIUM of shots,
shouts and screams erupted as am-
bassadors, generals and other
dignitaries fell wounded or hurled
themselves to the floor of the reviewing
stand to escape the gunfire.

Live television coverage of the
parade abruptly stopped. The state
radio continued to broadcast for a few
minutes and an unidentified man was
heard shouting an obscenity while
another ordered the audience to remain
seated.
Troops surrounded the national
palace, the state radio and several em-
bassies. But these were apparently
precautionary measures and there
were no indications that Sadat's
assassination was part of a coup d'etat.
Even before the official confirmation,
the state radio began broadcasting ver-
ses from the Koran, a traditional sign of
mourning apparently aimed at
preparing Egyptians for new of Sadat's
death.

HARRISON ZPA/A1PRI OF TNT'_A45r
FORD LOST ARK p 4.0
7:00
BARGAIN HOURS NOW IN EFFECT 9:30
What hoppened DAILY
1AW FAL to him shouFti 1-15 3:15 ? 5:15
b ue KRA d ICI A uM% happen to you. 7-15 4.15

Mubarak
... will run for presidency

it Superlative... this was a brilliant performance,
technically and interpretively. 3
- The Philadelphia Inquirer
-
Zagreb Philharmonic Orchestr
Stanko Horvat: Choral for Strings (1968)
Dvoiak: Cello Concerto in B minor
Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 in E minor
HIll Auditorium
Friday,Octf10 at 8:30
Tickets at $13.00, $11.00, $10.00, $9.00, $7.00, $5.00
Pal Denali .Cnducirtor

'I

IN A VERY SPECIAL edpse
BENEFI T PERFORMANCE

When they met they
heard bells. And that
was just round one.
JOHN BELUSHI &
BLAIR BROWN
CONTINENTAL ,
DMDE
~~JA UNIVERSAL
7-PICTURE
Tonight At
7:20-9:35

rf

A REVEALING
COMEDY

I

RYAN O'NFAL
JACK WARDEN
(Upper Level)
TonightAt 7:40-9:40
f{I xTN.TVY 11ITW AMI

AP-" -MI M

W 4C7

23 aU go UE-o- ,

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11

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