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October 06, 1981 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-06

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, October 6, 1981-Page 5

r

AP Photo,
Steady.!
The external tank for the third space shuttle mission is carefully backed into the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy
Space Center. The tank will be mounted on the Columbia after the spaceship's next mission.
17 faculty members
h]61hored with awards

Japanese
men suffer
impotence
increase
TOKYO (UPI)-Japan's highly com-
petitive industrial society with its em-
phasis on success is blamed for a
massive increase in sexual impotence
among yung men, the Kyodonew ser-
vice reported yesterday.
Japenese doctors are calling for
special centers to deal with sexual
inadequacy and a 150-member impoten-
ce research society composed of
urologists, gynecologists and
psychologists, was recently established
to study the problem, Kyodo said
ONE DOCTOR WAS quoted as
saying he dealt with five to 10 cases of
impotence a year in the 1950s, but now
sees 150-180 cases annually.
He said nearly 70 percent of cases are
young men in their 20s and 30s, the age
when they would normally be in their
sexual prime.
Doctors at a Tokyo university said
nearly 50 percent of some 320 cases of
impotence treated in the past two years
were psychological in nature.
They noted 30 percent were primary,
or "honeymoon," impotence cases in-
volving young men facing their first
sexual experiences.
WHY WON'T ANY
OTHER THEATER IN
ANN ARBOR SHOW
T HIS MOVIE?
MELVYN
DOUGLAS
Marelous KEDROVA
Triumph.
Q LIU&(PG(
BECAUSE . . IT DEALS WITH
TEINSYOU CAE ABOT LE
GROWNG OLD AND LOVE.
00 TUESDAY ONLY $1.00
ALL SEATS-ALL NIGHT
ENDS THURSDAY
"GLENDA JACKSON
IS SIMPLY SUPERB."
-Judith Crist
Saturday Review
(PG)
DAILY-7:20, 9:20
WED-1:10, 3:10, 5:20,
7:20920

The Caine's sailors were angry at Queeg,
They felt the strain of the sea, and fatigue;
But the same food all week
Really heightened their pique,
"Let's mutiny, and head for the Leaague!"
d"l. SPE
STUI
TheNchigan
227,
Next to Hill Auditorium You
Located in the heart of the campus, tick
it is the heart of the campus ... one

~..

GICYCLE JIM'S.
HAPPY HOUR
Beer: 2.25 Pitcher
.50 Mug
Fries .25
Mon.-Thurs. 8:00 P.M. Till Close

1301 S. University

Open 7 days
11 :00 A.M.-Midnight

Fl:

a
1
1

Seventeen University faculty mem-
bers were honored yesterday for
distinguished scholarship, teaching and
service.
Four types of awards totaling $18,750
were made at the last night's Faculty-
Staff convocation: Distinguished
Faculty Achievement Award; AMOCO
Foundation Good Teaching Award;
Faculty Recognition Award; U-M
Press Book Award; and the Josephine
Nevins Keal Fellowship.
THE FIVE faculty members who
received the U-M Distinguished
Faculty Achievement Award are:
Richard Alexander, professor of
biology and curator of insects, Museum
of Zoology; Lawrence Bartell,
professor of chemistry; Isadore Ber-
nstein, professor of, biological
chemistry and environmental and in-
dustrial health; Frederick Gehring,
professor of mathematics; and Jacob
Price, professor of history.
The $1,000 award is presented for

Lunch 11:30to 1:15
Dinner 5:00 to 7:15
CIAL LOW PRICES FOR
JDENTS
d yourLeague Limerick to:
pager, Michigan League
South Ingalls
will receive 2 free dinner
ets if your,limerick is used in
of our ads.

distinguished achievement in teaching,
research, publication, creative work in
the art, public service, and other ac-
tivities which bring distinction to the
University. Funds are provided by the
Michigan Annual Giving Fund of the U-
M Development Office.
AMOCO Foundation Good Teaching
Award winners were: Herbert
Barrows, professor of English; Alphon-
se Burdi, professor of anatomy;
Samuel Eldersveld, professor of
political science; Gene Smith,
professor of mechanical engineering;
Milton Tamres, professor of chemistry;
and David 0. Ross, professor of
classical studies.
THE AMOCO award of $1,500 is' given
to faculty members for excellence in
undergraduate instruction. Funds are
provided by the AMOCO Foundation
through the U-M Development Office.
The U-M Faculty Recognition Award
was presented to: Howard Brabson,
associate professor of social work;

Maria Comninou, associate professor of
civil engineering; Miroslav Nincic,
assistant professor of political science;
George Siedel, associate professor of
business law; and Bernard Van't Hul,
associate professor of English.
The $750 award is given to junior
faculty members for their impact on
the life of the student body as a teacher
and counselor.
This year's $1,000 U-M Press Book
Award was presented to Joseph Sax,
professor of law, for his book "Moun-
tains Without Handrails-Reflections
on theNational Parks," published by
the U-M Press last year.
The Josephine Nevins Keal
Fellowship was awarded to Joanne
Leonard, associate professor of art:
Established by a bequest from the
estate of Josephine Keal, who received
two degrees from U-M, the fellowship is
designed to assist women faculty in ad-
vancing their professional competence
and rank, through study and research:

"The way opera should be given and seldom is."
- The Baltimore Sun
Candace Goetz, soprano Thomas Hammons, bass-baritone
Donna Anna, a Spanish Leporello, servant to Don
noblewoman Giovanni
Scheduled for Sunday's performance
GoI dovky Opera Company
Morcrt's 'onGiovcnnV'
inEnglish
a1tOcL. 10C00: 00
Ouns, ,Oct., I1Ia l:00
Power Center
Tickets at $10.00, $9.00,$8.00, $6.00,
Tickets at Burton Tower, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Weekdays 9-4:30, Sat. 9-12 (313) 665-3717
Tickets also available at Power Center
1% hours before performance time
--VESITYrWUSICAL SOCIETY
In Its 103rd Year

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Shapiro: Federal cuts pose threat

(Continued from Page 1)
"faculty salaries, financial aid, equip-
ment, and books."
State support for the basic instruc-
tional and research activities of the
University fell by 12 percent last year,
if adjusted for inflation, Shapiro said.
GIVEN THIS REDUCED state sup-
port, Shapiro said, "We could not meet
all the legitimate needs of existing
programs despite extensive use of
University reserves and certain aspec-
ts of our endowment."
The objectives of the University have
remained unchanged for more than a
century, but now continued progress
toward their realization has required
adjustments in University activities,
Shapiro explained.
"WE ATTEMPTED to respond in 'a
manner that would create opportunity
from adversity," Shapiro said,
referring to the administration's
"smaller but better" approach to
budget cutbacks.
Shapiro said that constant
reassessment of University programs

is necessary if the University is to enjoy
the "vitality produced by gradual
movement from areas that may have
served us well in the past but no longer
satisfy our aspirations for excellence."
This process of reassessment is cen-
tral to the maintenance of quality at the
University, Shapiro asserted.
SHAPIRO, explaining the use of his
phrase "smaller but better," said
"Smaller is not a goal; it is, rather, a
strategy of choice. At most, it can be
but one significant element in an
overall strategy to achieve our objec-'
tives."
Shapiro explained that by carefully
reducing the number and size, of
programs at the University the ad-
ministration can increase faculty and
staff salaries, improve the program for
research support, the student financial
aid program, the availability of equip-
ment and laboratories, and the
capacity to fund new intellectual ex-
ploration.
"Behind cold phrases such as
reallocation of funds or redeployment

of resources stand heated human
problems. Reallocation or
redeployment, may mean that some
members of our community will not be
included-or at least not fully in-
cluded-in our future," Shapiro said of
the administration's policy of retren-
chment.

01
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