100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 06, 1981 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4V

0

Page 2-Tuesday, October 6, 1981-The Michigan Daily

ANN ARBOR GOLD AND SILVER EXCHANGE
216 S. Fourth Ave. I&1495
- ANU cGOLD
Any Item Marked 10 k - 14 kt - 18k1 WAHES
DENTAL GOLD FOREIGN GOLD GOLD METALS
CLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS EYEGLASS FRAMES
GOLD COINS GOLD PINS GOLD CUFF LINKS
BROKEN JEWELRY
DIAMONDS GOLD WATCHESCi* SILVER
We purchase any y shape GOLD CHAINS Sterling Flatware
We an c t ysto !Tea ets, "Jewelry * Industrial
any coloregone
We pay y weight Hours: Mon. thru Sat.94:00 AM" 5:00 PM te certified scales

CIA infiltration
of U.S. groups
may be allowed

I

fir,

A

- f *?*fi-

WASHINGTON (AP)-- A draft
presidential order would allow the CIA
to infiltrate domestic groups and, with
the attorney general's approval,
secretly influence their activities,
government sources said yesterday.
The document is the third draft of a
revised executive order which the
Reagan administration has sent to
Capitol Hill. It would replace
guidelines issued by President Carter
in January 1978 to govern the conduct of
U.S. intelligence agencies.
SOURCES INSIDE and outside the
government said the order also would:
g Remove prohibitions against the
CIA's conducting "special activities,"
or convert actions, inside the United
States, if they are not intended to in-
fluence U.S. policies or politics.
- Strike the requirement that in-
telligence agents reasonably believe
that U.S. citizens and corporations
abroad are agents of a foreign power or
involved in terrorism or drug traffic
before they can be put under physical
surveillance.
s Retainbans on assassinations, on
CIA electronic surveillance in the
United States and on CIA break-ins in
this country.
* Assert that restrictions on the FBI's
conducting electronic surveillance or
warrantless break-ins on U.S. citizens
and corporations are not meant to limit
the constitutional powers of the

president.
The CIA refused comment on the
proposed order, which President
Reagan could implement on his own
authortiy. Consultation with Congress
on such a question is largely advisory.
The draft also says it does not
authorize any violations of existing
laws, but some sources said that in cer-
tain areas, particularlyinvolving Four-
th Amendment protections against
unreasonable searches, there is little or
no existing law other than the Carter
executive order.
ONE REPUBLICAN source said
"there is no burning desire to get the
CIA involved in domestic activity."
Another source added that some sec-
tions of the order may have been
mistakenly drafted more broadly than
the administration actually intended.
Several sources said the impact of the
order will depend on how some of the
language is interpreted and what im-
plementing procedures agency chiefs
establish, pending approval by the at-
torney general.
Sen. Harrison Schmitt, (R.- N.M.)
chairman of the Senate Intelligence
subcommitee on rights of Americans,
said the Justice Department refused
yesterday to give on-the-record
testimony on the interpretation of the
draft order at a closed hearing.
The subcommittee, in turn, refused to
accept off-the-record testimony and the
hearing broke up.

2 for 1
LOng Neck Beer
NIGHT HAWKS

*
*

.A A - -A-.-,

A

TUESDAYLUNCH-DISCUSSION
OCTOBER 6-12 NOON
"UGANDA AND
ITS PREDICAMENT"
Speaker: OMARI KOKOLE Q
At the INTERNAi7ONAL CENTER'
603 E. Madison Street
Lunch $1.00
For additional information please call 662-5529

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
1981 auto sales drop
DETROIT- U.S. automakers closed the books on another disaster yester-
day, reporting 1981 model year sales of 6,590,017 cars were off 2.6 percent
from a severely depressed 6,787,495 in the 1980 model year.
Both of those figures are slightly above the depths of the last recession
reached in 1975, when sales dropped to 6.58 million. But that previous down-
turn year was sandwiched between stronger performances of 8.1 million in
1974 and 8.5 million in 1976.
By contrast, 1981 model year sales were down 34 percent from the robust
1973 model year total of 10 million.
Domestic automakers said they sold 518,522 cars in September, up only 6.7
percent from the same month last year despite heavy price discounting.
Iranians execute leftists;
new president elected
BEIRUT, Lebanon- Government firing squads executed 129 leftists
yesterday and Iran's fundamentalist Moslem regime proclaimed
Hojatoleslam Ali Khamenei president by a record vote, Tehran's official
media reported.
Firing squads at Tehran's Evin Prison executed 61 urban guerrillas at
daybreak yesterday and 68 other leftists were put to death elsewhere across
the country, according to a prison spokesman and the state-run Kayhan
newspaper.
The prison spokesman, who refused to give his name, said the prisoners
were convicted of street violence and armed insurgence against the Islamic
republic. The Tehran newspaper said the other leftists were executed on
similar charges.
Meanwhile, the government trumpeted Khamenei's victory as the biggest
landslide in the Islamic republic's 32-month history.
Haig, Reagan seek
support for AWACS deal
WASHINGTON- In a furious attempt to salvage an $8.5 billion arms deal
to Saudi Arabia, Secretary of State Alexander Haig charged opponents with
"illusions . . . irresponsible in the extreme" yesterday while President
Reagan unveiled support from six previous administrations.
Haig, in testimony to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, personally
assailed Democrat John Glenn of Ohio for what he termed the "imaginary"
claim that a compromise could be worked out calling for joint U.S.-Saudi
manning of the five AWACS radar planes at the heart of the sale.
The president, meanwhile, assembled 16 defense and foreign policy of-
ficials from Washington's past for a White House display of bipartisan sup-
port. The officials included former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, who
served presidents Nixon and Ford, and Zbigniew Brzezinski, the national
securityadviser to President Carter.
Reagan urges return
to volunteer work
WASHINGTON- President Reagan, calling for a rejuvenation of
"America's deep spirit of generosity,"' said yesterday the nation should turn
more toward v6lunteer work and private initiative to help cure its social ills.
"With the same energy that Franklin Roosevelt sought government
solutions to problems, we will seek private solutions," the president said in a
speech before the National Alliance of Business.
The National Alliance of Business is a voluntary organization of business
leaders whose aim is to reduce unemployment among the poor.
Noting efforts by corporations and individuals around the country to help
the poor and homeless, Reagan said, "Volunteer cuts would be much more
disruptive to the nation than federal budget cuts.
"Because they are so important, this administration seeks to elevate
voluntary action and private initiative to the recognition they deserve. We
seek to increase their influence on our daily lives and their roles in meeting
our social needs," the president said.
Vol. XCII, No. 23
Tuesday, October 6, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
-University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press international.
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764.0552, 76-DAILY, Sports desk, 764-0562, Circulation. 764-0558. Classified advertising

0

Court to examine
Congress 'spending

WASHINGTON (AP) - The supreme
Court, opening a new term with one of
its busiest days in history, said yester-
day it will decide the constitutinality of
how Congress does much of its spen-
ding.
With Justice Sandra Day O'Connor
making her public debut as a working
member, the court issued some 1,000
orders and began hearing arguments in
cases already accepted for study.
The justices said they will decide the
validity of the "one-house veto,"under

which either house of Congress may set
aside decisions of the president or
government agencies.
A Federal appeals court said the
much-used legislative procedure - an
element in more than 20 laws dictating
the spending of billions of dollars-is un-
constitutional.
The Justice Department and lawyers
for the Senate and House now must try
to convince the nation's highest court
that the appeals court was wrong.,

Who will be first
with the electronics
of the future?

0

It could be you and Hughes.
And that's no idle statement. Be-
cause the string of Hughes firsts is
legendary, from firsts in submicronics
to firsts that span interplanetary dis-
tances.
And you'll find Hughes a perfect
career choice at almost every level of
expertise. You'll find a wide variety of
locations spanning Southern California
and Tucson, with environments to ac-
comodate every lifestyle. You'll have all
the advantages of a major, internation-
ally recognized company, coupled with
the personal responsibility and visibil-
ity possible in Hughes' smaller de-
centralized groups.
But most of all, you'll be part of a

company that puts you at the threshold
of virtually every state-of-the-art tech-
nology - on the ground, on the seas,
in the air, in deep space.
Who will be first with the electronics
of the future?
With 1,500 projects, a $6 billion back-
log and opportunities like these, it
could be you and Hughes.
At Hughes Aircraft, we'll introduce
you to people, ideas and jobs that
could change your world. And maybe
ours.
Our current opportunities are for grad-
uates in:
" Electrical Engineering
" Physics
* Computer Science

We also have some opportunities in:
" Mechanical Engineering
" Manufacturing/Industrial
Engineering
" Material & Processes
" Mathematics
" Aeronautical Engineering
The following Hughes
groups will be on campus:
October 13
(see your placement office
for an appointment)
ELECTRO-OPTICAL & DATA SYSTEMS
GROUND SYSTEMS
INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS
MISSILE SYSTEMS
RADAR SYSTEMS
SPACE & COMMUNICATIONS
.- ------------- 1

It could be you and Hughes

764-0557' Display advertising. 764-0554, Billing 764-0550.
Editor in chief....................SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor..............JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor.................LORENZO BENET
News Editor ........................DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors...............KEVIN TOTTIS
CHARLES THOMSON
Sports Editor.................MARK MIHANOVIC
Associate Sports Editors............ GREG DeGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
Chief Photographer..............PAUL ENGSTROM
ARTISTS: Robert Lence. Norm Christiansen. Jonathan
Stewart.
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell, Kim Hill, Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas, Brian Mosck.
MAGAZINE/ARTS STAFF: Jane Carl, Mark Dighton,
Adam Knee, Pam Kramer, Gail Negbour, Howard
Witt.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam. Beth Allen. Doug Brice,
CrolChaltron, Andrew Chapman, Liso Crumrine,
Debi Davis, Ann Marie Fazio, Pam Fickinger. Maureen
Fleming. Denise Franklin, Joyce Frieden, Mork Gin-
din, Julie Hinds, Steve Hook, Kathy Hoover. Jennifer
Miller. Don Oberrotman, Janet Rae. David Spok, Fan.
nie Weinstein, Barry Witt.

SPORTS STAFF
SPORTS STAFF: Barb Barker, Randy Berger, Mark
Borowdki, Joe Chapelle, Martha Crall, Jim Dworman.
John Fitzpatrick, Larry Freed, Chuck Hartwig, Chuck
Jaffe, John Kere, Larry Mishkin, Dan Newman, Ron
Pollack. Jeff Quicksilver, Steve Schaumberger,
Sarah Sherber, James Thompson, Kent Walley, Chris
Wilson, Bob Wonowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager..............RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager...................BARS FORSLUND
Operations Manager...............SUSANNE KELLY
Display Manager............ MARY ANN MISIEWICZ
Classifieds Manager............. DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager...............MICHAEL YORICK
Assistant Disolov Manager...........NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals Manager............. SUSAN RABUSHKA
Circulation Manager................KIM WOODS
Sales Coordinator ........... E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Liz Altman, Hope Barron, Lindsay
Bray, Joe Brodo, AlexanderDPI1is, AidaEisenstadt,
Susan Epps, Wendy Fox, Sandy Frcka, Pamela Gould,
Kathryn Hendrick, Anthony Interrante, Indre Luitkus,
Beth Kovinsky. Barbara Miner, Caryn Notisse, Felice
Oper, Jodi Pollock, Michael Savitt, Michael
Seltzer, Karen Silverstein, Sam Slaughter, Adrienne
Strambl, Nancy Thompson, Jeffrey Voigt.

0

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981

SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M,. T W T F S S Ml T W T F S
.---4-1523 1 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 6
10 11 12 4 6 7 8 9 10 8 10 It 12 13,14 6 B 9t1 12
13! 15 16 17 18 19 11 1314 15 16 17 15 17718 192021
20 22 2324 2526 18 20 21 22 23 24 22 24 25 a26-ah9a0 1"
27 29 30 25 6 27 28 29 30 31 No1as
1982
JANUARY FERUARY MARCH APRIL
C .-. wFEBc....rUARYt c cc cur

Iz:__ 1t1tD1 A - = - Ar A

rI

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan