100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 03, 1981 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SPORTS
Saturday, October 3, 1981-

The Michigan Daily

Page 7

Wolverines visit depleted Hoosiers

got vp
THE GAME .
k5N T (GONNA
BF- ON NATIt*4AL
T.-V. 3
i TsEP.
1
06MR
r ~ 01~~\l

a"
NOW COME OW
I F You DoNT
,C--T SF-tZtous,
ONE OF tltEsE
L-ITTLe GUYS
1,5 C- ONN
KNOCK US
OFF AGAIN I
6
I 1
eVil 1981

By MARK MIHANOVIC
Special to the DailW
BLOOMINGTON - When the
Michigan Wolverines travelled to In-
diana last November to battle the
Hoosiers, numerous question marks
followed them. They had blown out
Illinois to the tune of 45-14 the week
before, but yielded 545 yards in total of-
fense in the process. Quite simply,
Wolverine watchers were not yet cer-
tain whether the 1980 defense met the
usual standards.
The Wolverine defenders promptly
silenced their doubters with a 35-0
shutout of Indiana that day, and op-
ponents managed only three points
against Michigan over the next three
games.
IT IS EARLIER in the season, but for
Bo Schembechler and his football team,
it can never be too soon to quiet the
skeptics. And that is exactly what
Michigan will try to do today at 1:30
p.m. in Indiana's Memorial Stadium.
The Wolverines (2-1) find themselves
in a must-win situation which most
likely will endure throughout the
remaining eight weeks, courtesy of
their opening loss to Wisconsin. In fact,
a glance at the Big Ten standings finds
Michigan looking up at Indiana, which
almost dropped its opener to the door-
mat Northwestern Wildcats 21-20.
Since then the Hoosiers have lost

twice, 21-0 to Southern California and
21-7 to Syracuse,to bring their slate to
1-2. The Indiana defense was able to
keep the Trojans off the scoreboard un-
til well into the third period of that
game, though, a fact that was not lost
on Schembechler.
"INDIANA'S TEAM is playing solid
defense," said Bo, who has won all
eight contests versus the Hoosiers while
at Michigan. "That unit held USC
scoreless for nearly three quarters. I

think that speaks very highly of their
ability."
Fortunately for Bo, he will have
available to attack that defense the
services of wide receiver Anthony Car-
ter, who suffered a sprained ankle in
the Navy game last weekend. Several
other Wolverines have suffered injuries
this young season and two starters, left
guard Stefan Humpries (strained knee
tendons) and cornerback Brian Car-
penter (sprained ankle) did not make
the trip to Bloomington.
The Hoosier offense has not scored a
touchdown since the second quarter of
its first game (the lone TD versus
Syracuse was a kick return). It is not
completely bereft of weapons, however,
as sophomore Duane Gunn, who ran
back the kick 97 yards and has pass
receptions of 55 and 52 yards to his
credit, is starting to draw comparisons
with Michigan's quintessential big-play
man.
"THEY BOTH HAVE unlimited
natural ability," Hoosier coach Lee
Corso said. "Gunn probably doesn't
have Carter's pure speed, but he may
have a little more elusiveness. But
Carter has been doing it for three years
and Duane is just starting out."
Corso has a simple explanation for
the lack of effective punch beyond
Gunn. "We lost ninety percent of our

running game and 85% of our passing
game."
Corso is referring to the graduation of
runners Mike Harkrader, Lonnie John-n
son, Jerry Bowers and Al Darring, a
foursome which churned out 1786 of In-
dian&'s 2279 yards in 1980, and quarter-
back Tim Clifford, the Big Ten'smost
valuable player two years ago.
THE HOOSIERS WERE looking for
Kevin Burke to fill part of the gap at -
tailback, but his tragic death from
leukemia in July further weakened the
running game, which is only notching
3.7 yards per carry.
Junior Babe Laufenberg has com-
pleted 38 of 56 passes for 430 yards and
one touchdown as Clifford's successor.
A big target for Laufenberg is senior
tight end Bob Stephenson (6'3"-235),
who has caught 75 passes in the past
two years.
Despite the effectiveness of his
defense, Corso is wary of Michigan's
potential on the attack. "This is just a
great football team," Corso said. "They
have massive, quick people upfront and
a lot of qualtiy backs. You could talk
about (Butch) Woolfolk, but if you
remember it was (Lawrence) Ricks
who came in last year and ripped us up
(123)."

Carter
.. ankle OK

BIG 10 PREVIEW:
buckeyes host tough Florida St.

THE LINEUPS
[IGAN IND
OFFENSE'

MICH

lIANA

By JOHN KERR
t\ The days of other conferences knocking the Big Ten around
the gridiron appear to be over.
With seven victories in nine games against non-conference
opponents last weekend, the Big Ten upped its record to 13-7
against outside foes. With only two non-conference games
remaining, the Big Ten is insured of its best non-league per-
formance since 1963.
THE VICTORIES have not been at the expense of
pushovers, either. Independent power Notre Dame has fallen
prey to both Michigan and Purdue, while Pac-10 member
Stanford lost to both Ohio State and Purdue. Iowa, not usually
cohsidered anational power, has whipped Nebraska and
UCLA.
But this week, eight of the conference teams-all but
Michigan State and Ohio State-must focus on inter-league
play. The seventh-ranked Buckeyes (3-0) go into today's con-
test with Florida State looking to post another impressive Big
Ten victory over a tough, non-conference opponent. Florida
State has been ranked in the Top Twenty at various times this
season and sports a 1-1 record. While not possessing the ex-
plosive passing offense that has been the mark of past
Seminole squads, this Florida State team will still provide a
tough test for the Buckeyes. Much of the Seminoles' fate will
be determined by their defense, -which has the formidable
task of stopping Buckeye quarterback Art Schlichter and
tailback Tim Spencer. Spencer is the Big Ten's second
leading rusher, averaging 118.7 yards a game.
In the other non-league contest Michigan State (1-2) will
try to hand Notre Dame'(1-2) its third straight loss at the
hands of Big Ten teams. Notre Dame's rookie head coach
Gerry Faust can ill-afford to lose three straight and Michigan
State is looking to knock off a big team. The Spartans
registered their first victory of the season last'week in an
unimpressive 10-7 win over Bowling Green. The Irish secon-
dary, however, will be in for a workout from the Michigan
her State passing offense. The Spartans lead the Big Ten in

passing, averaging 221.7 yards a game. But one glaring
weakness in the Spartan offensive attack is the running
game. Michigan State has gained only 81 yards per contest on
the ground this year. In order to upset the Irish, Michigan
State must not only continue to pass effectively, but also
establish some sort of running game.
IN AN IMPORTANT conference matchup, Minnesota (3-0)
will travel to Illinois (2-1). Since both are 1-0 in the conferen-
ce, a share of first place is guaranteed for the victor. If the
Golden Gophers can come away with a win it will be the first
time since 1960 that Minnesota has won its first four contests.
The Gophers will pit their rushing attack, tops in the con-
ference with 235.7 yards a game, against Illinois' rushing
defense, currently second in the league. In contrast, Min-
nesota must find some way to slow down the Illini's passing
attack. Illinois quarterback Tony Eason has completed over
60% of his passes this year. However, Minnesota quarterback
Mike Hohensee is definitely no slouch as he leads the con-
ference in passing efficiency.
At Madison this weekend the Badgers (2-1) and the Purdue
Boilermakers (2-1) will be featured in a televised contest.
This marks the first time that Wisconsin will be shown on the
tube since 1974. The Badgers will have their hands full,
however, trying to control Purdue quarterback Scott Cam-
pbell and his favorite receiver, Steve Bryant. Bryant leads
the Big Ten in receptions with 4.7 a game. Purdue could be in
for an emotional letdown after last week's thrilling 15-14 up-
set of Notre Dame, and playing in Madison is always tough,
as Michigan found out earlier in the year. Wisconsin will also
be looking to hold on to a share of first place in the Big Ten,
while Purdue is hoping to register its first conference vic-
tory.
In what seems to be the only mismatch of the day, 18th
ranked Iowa (2-1) will travel to Northwestern (0-3). The
Wildcats have lost 23 straight games, while the Hawkeyes
are fresh off a 20-7 upset over UCLA. The Northwestern of-
fense, worst in the league, will have to work miracles to move
the ball against Iowa, the Big Ten's leading defense,

(82) Norm Betts .............. (230)
(72) Ed Muransky ............(25)
(65) Kurt Becker ...........N(260)
(69) Tom Dixon ...............(238)
(64) Jerry Diorio .............(230)
(75) Bubba Paris ............. (270)
( 1) Anthony Carter.........(161)
(27) Vince Bean..............(185)
(16) Steve Smith .............. (191)
(32) Stan Edwards..........(208)
(24) Butch Woolfolk ........... (208)
( 6) Ali Hhaji-Sheikh ........... (172)

T C.
ST
RG
C
IG
QT
WR
SE
QB
FB
TB
PK

(84) Bob Stephenson...........(235)
(57) Mark Rodriguez........(265)
(55) Jim Sakanich...........(255)
(50) Jeff Wiebell .............. (22)
(66) Dennis Mills ............(235)
(72) Chuck Gannon..........(264)
(16) Todd Shroyer...........(160)
(89) Duane Gunn............(172)
( 7) Babe Laufenberg........(188)
(34) Jack Walsh ..............(215)
(26) Al Christy ................ (193)
( 9) Mike Greenstein........(190)

DEFENSE

(99)
(63)
(73)
(92)
(97)
(50)
(40)
(21)
( 3)
(13)
(37)
(28)

Robert Thompson.........(219)
Winfred Carraway........(230)
Doug James............(242)
Cedric Coles............(237)
Ben Needham ............ (215)
Paul Girgash ............. (210)
Mike Boren............(217)
Evan Cooper ............. (170)
MarionBody .............(178)
Keith Bostic .............. (209)
Tony .Jackson ...........(174)
Don Bracken ............. (185)

OLB
T
MG
T
OLB
ILB
ILB
WIIB
SIM
s s
FS
P

(38) Jimmy Hunter......... (218)
(76) Ron Walden .............. (267)
(94) Marty Young ............. (257)
(93) Greg Brown ..............(248)
(31) Craig Kumerow ......... (225)
(60) Craig Wells ..............(220)
(28) Ralph Caldwell..........(225)
(49) Marc Longshore........(188)
(19) MiYke Pendleton.........(176)
(21) Dart Ramsey............(198)
t 1) Steve Mitchell ............ (190)
( 6) (h dck Razmic .........094)

t

ANN ARBOR GOLD AND SILVER EXCHANGE
416 S. Fourth Ave.94-9054
WANTED W oL k
PlA1iNUM 9 oCKET
Any Item Marked10o14k-18 WAcHE
DENTAL GOLD FOREIGN GOLD, GOLD METALS
CLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS EYEGLASS FRAMES
GOLD COINS GOLD PINS GOLD CUFF LINKS
BROKEN JEWELRY
DIAMONDS GOLD WATCHES SILVER
We purchase any cut any shape GOLD'CHAINS Cons tstering Iowoe
any color stone TaS* * di*tn
We pay by weight Hours: Mon. thtu Sat 9:00 AM 5:00 PM State certified scales

Spencer

... second leading rust

rStudent
runners
race for
.charity
today,

By SARAH SHERBER
"Hey you... you want to run?"
"No, I think I gave up running.'
"YEAH, AND I think you used to be
skinny, too."
Lambda Chi Alpha member Don
Compton was not being intentionally
obnoxious. It was late yesterday after-
noon and he and his fraternity were still
trying to enlist over 50 runners for
tomorrow's Second Annual Lamda Chi
Alpha Road and Fun Race.
As the preparations for the race come
to a close, the Greek organization can
boast of a tremendous increase in par-
ticipants from last years race. In that
outing, only 85 people ran in the 7.3 mile
event. This year the chapter has
already accepted applications from 125
runners for the 7.3 mile affair, and
another 150 people have signed up to
compete in the Fun Run.
THIS IS the first year for the Fun
Run, a two-mile race. "We put in the

race to let more participation from
sorority girls," reported Lamda Chi
Alpha president Gregg Averill.
Any person wishing to compete in the
race can still sign up by going to the
fraternity at 1601 Washtenaw by 10 a.m.
tomorrow with a $9.00 entry fee. All
proceeds from the race will go to
benefit the C.S. Mott Children's
Hospital.
Prospective runners should be war-
ned that the race is not an easy one.
"The course is very tough and hilly,"
said Peter Kelly who participated in the
race last year.
Since last year's winner, law school
student Paul Denis, has yet to register

for the event, it appears that the
favorite is now Dave Lewis. Lewis was
the captain of the cross country team
last year and finished fifth in the Big
Ten Championships in 1980.
Anyone who enters either race will
receive a T-shirt donated by, Stroh's
beer and be eligible to draw for prizes
courtesy of Moe's Sport Shops.

ui

U.S. POSTAL SERVICE
STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION
' - (~Required by 39 U S.C. 3685)
I TITLE OF PUBLICATION A ' .!(AIIONnT2 DATE OF FILING
Plie Nichigan Daily vctoL P 1, 19811
3 FREOUENCY OF ISSUE A NO. OF ISSUES PUBLISHED B.ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIO
ANNUALLY PRICE
Daily except Monday,_sec. )chool Year 223 3 18.50
0 COMPLETE MAILING ADDRESS OF KNOWN OFFICE OF PUBLICATION (Street City. County. State and ZIP Code (Not prlnferSI
420 saynard street, Ann Arbor, .ichigan 48109
S. COMPLETE MAILING ADDRESS OF THE HEADQUARTERS OR GENERAL BUSINESS OFFICES OF THE PUBLISHERS (Not pnfes
420 Faynard Street, ,nn Arbor, hichigan 48109
6. FULL NAMES AND COMPLETE MAILING ADDRESS OF PUBLISHER. EDITOR. AND MANAGING EDITOR (Thi Item MUST NOT be blank)

Js1

PUBLISHER (Name and Complete Melling Address)

Sunday afternoon concerts in the
Michign Thea tre
Oct. 4, 1-4 p.m.-$2.00
SAVAGE
T. Petty, J. Starship, Heart covers

RELIGIOUS DIMENSIONS OF
CONTEMPORARY CONCERNS
A SERIES OF LECTURE-DISCUSSIONS
Continuing the Monday Night series of lectures where subjects
of current major interest are discussed at THE ECUMENICAL
CAMPUS CENTER, 921 Church Street. Everyone is welcome
to these discussions. Beginning at 7:30 P.M., with refresh-
ments, the speaker or speakers will make their presentation
and engage in discussion until 9:00 P.M.
COME JOIN US!
MONDAY, OCTOBER 6th-Panel: REVEREND BARBARA
FULLER, An Indochina consultant for the Division of Missions
for the Disciples of Christ and a leader in the Ann Arbor
Interfaith Council for Peace.
DR. DONALD LESTER, Executive Presbyter, Presbytery of De-
troit.
DR. JITSUO MORIKAWA, Senior Minister First Baptist Church

E3oard for situdent P ubications, 420 iayncrd 6t. Ann Arbor, hi 48109
EDITOR (N oErne and Complete a iling Address)
..ara Anspach, 906 t; Ann, An Arbor, hi 48104 __
MANAGING EDITOR (Name and Complete Mailing Address)A W
Julie orsurecht, 406 isac aad, Annnr r1rbor, 9i 48104
7 OWNER (1 owned by a corporation. Its name and address must be stated and also immediately thereunder the names and addresses of stock
,holders owning or holdIng f p, rcent or more of total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporatIon, the names and addresses ofthe Individualtowner5
must be given. It owned by a partnership or other unIncorporated firm, its name and address, as wall as that of cach ,ndlridual mustIbe yneqI~t ~the
publication is published by a nonprof(it organization. its name and address must be stated.) (tem must be completed)
FULL NAME v COMPLETE MAILING ADRESS
Board for Student Public-t ions 1420 La nar, An Arbor, Il~i 4-'102
--
'OTh. ArICXIOf 01 NE; 10";I;I{A ,F.'; l I. ..4-f :,E', filtthere are none. so stale!
FULL NAME COMPLETE MAILING ADDRESS w
H;ONE ___ _ ____

(1). FOR GOMPLET N HY NONPR OT iANZAT N ZE AA(Section 411 MM only
Checkone)

® HAS NOT CHANGED DURING
PRECEDING 12 MONTHS

127
Ol HAS CHANGED DURING
PRECEDING 12 MONTHS

to changed. publshel mustsubmt espfanatlon of
change wih this statement. I

_,.______________________________^""""""" "r
1Alf "AT-NT N10 tNAT+i'IF.: {.{{'!N

1 0.

EXTENT AND NAURE Cif (tCttATRIN

A~~~ ~ TOA°OC'E ~s rs aI52

N '4i A }l
5 50

A.TTAL NO. COPES(Not Prea Run)

1 5025

-

________________________________________---4I---- . --- --- -,

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan